So, how does Peter Thomas Roth's formula for his Anti-Aging Cleanser stack up against other anti-aging cleansersWell, it's peachy keen (and I mean that literally, with peach extract lending its part to both the formula's smell and coloring), but sadly with a few bad fruits that possibly will ruin the basket.  (How's that for an overly-extended metaphor?)

What's nice about it is that it's an oil-free gel that lathers up into a good foam, thanks to the high-lathering ammonium laureth/laurel sulfates. And will work well to lighten and refine your skin, in addition to being a decent anti-acne, anti-aging and anti-wrinkle formula. However, I wouldn't recommend Peter Thomas Roth Anti-Aging Cleanser for people with sensitive skin. But more on that later.

There are a few anti-aging ingredients in this formula. The acids are glycolic, salicylic acid and arginine.

Glycolic acid (source: sugar cane), is an alpha hydroxy acid with proven skin-rejuvenating properties that increases exfoliation and has a positive effect on the skin’s ability to hold moisture. The key is to look for formulas with a 5-10% concentration, leaving it on your skin for at least a minute to be effective. I have a sneaking suspicion that this formula falls below this range since the line's other glycolic acid-specific cleanser has levels at the 3% range.

Salicylic acid is a beta hydroxy acid that causes shedding of the outer layer of skin, preventing pores from clogging up, and allowing room for new cell growth.

When you add to this the amino acid L-arginine, which Columbia University calls the "magic bullet" in human health and "one of the potent nutraceuticals ever discovered", you've got a nice combination for deep pore resurfacing with increased cell turnover, all helping to diminish the appearance of fine lines, wrinkles and other signs of aging.

Other notables in the formula include white oak bark extract, an astringent, antiseptic and diuretic that will help tone and strengthen the skin; calming linden extract; soothing panthenol; and brightening citrus extracts and bioflavonoids. Then there is allantoin: current studies show that it is an anti-irritant and skin-soother, although there is little evidence to back up its anti-aging claims.

Unfortunately, there are some things to be avoided. Quaternium-15 is a widely used preservative that acts as a formaldehyde releaser. So if you're allergic to formaldehyde, you probably will be allergic to quaternium-15.

While less notable than those listed above, it's still worth calling out the presence of methylparaben, cocamide DEA. The latter of which can lead to formation of nitrosamines, which are carcinogenic, according to a study on rats. However, I must point out that the CIR Expert Panel concluded that Cocamide DEA was safe as used in rinse-off products (such as this) and safe at concentrations of less than or equal to 10% in leave-on products.

Ingredients in Peter Thomas Roth Anti-Aging Cleanser

Water, Ammonium Lauryl Sulfate, Ammonium Laureth Sulfate, Cocamidopropyl Betaine, Cocamide DEA, Cetyl Polyglucoside, Propylene Glycol, Glycolic Acid, Arginine, Salicylic Acid (Beta Hydroxy Acid), Peach Extract, White Oak Bark Extract, Lemon Extract, Lime Extract, Linden Flower Extract, Grapefruit Extract, Allantoin, Panthenol, Citrus Bioflavonoids, Methylparaben, Red #40, Yellow #5, Fragrance, Quaternium-15.