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Sodium Silicate

* A buffering agent and pH adjuster * Also known as Water Glass

Sodium Silicate is primarily used as in the manufacture of soaps and detergents, because of its ability to provide a constant pH value; it is also "used to prevent the corrosion (rust) of metallic materials used in cosmetic packaging," according to CosmeticsInfo.org. It is found in a variety of products, including skin care and hair coloring formulas, as well as in eye make up and oral hygeine products.

* A buffering agent and pH adjuster

* Also known as Water Glass

Functions:

Sodium Silicate is primarily used as in the manufacture of soaps and detergents, because of its ability to provide a constant pH value; it is also "used to prevent the corrosion (rust) of metallic materials used in cosmetic packaging," according to CosmeticsInfo.org. It is found in a variety of products, including skin care and hair coloring formulas, as well as in eye make up and oral hygeine products.

Industrially, Sodium Silicate is also used as an ingredient in the manufacture of cements, passive fire protection, refractories, textile and lumber processing, and automobiles. According to an article in the Wall Street Journal, it is "the designated agent of death for cars surrendered under the federal cash-for-clunkers program," because of its ability to permanently disable car engines. It was also historically used as used as an egg preservation agent in the late 1900s, preventing the penetration of bacteria that would spoil the eggs (Wikipedia).

Sodium Silicate is CIR approved with concentration limits, and FDA approved as a food additive with the GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) rating.

Safety Measures/Side Effects:

The Cosmetics Database finds Sodium Silicate to be a moderate hazard ingredient, and is classified as expected to be toxic or harmful, as a human irritant and as a human toxicant. There are concentration limits for Sodium Silicate, and concerns regarding allergic reactions, organ system toxicity and irritation of the skin and eyes. However, ultimately, the CIR considers this ingredient safe based on assumption of low absorption. No studies were found that listed direct negative side effects from the use of sodium silicate in topical application. The American Journal of Contact Dermatitis found it to be a potentially irritating antiseptic.

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