Now that Amatokin is widely available in stores - after a period of so-called underground cult status amongst a handful of Hollywood celebrities - it is worth taking a closer look at this cream that purports to stimulate stem cell growth. Not content with the underground cult stuff, Amatokin's marketing department came up with an origination myth full of Cold War imagery of Russian scientists imprisoned behind barbed wire.

As it happens, there is a Russian behind Amatokin, Dr Taras Nikolaev. He managed to escape to a company in Switzerland called United Cosmeceuticals GmbH, bringing with him his magical stem cell boosting ingredient - polypeptide 153. The company says it tested the peptide on rats to demonstrate that it increases blood flow and on mice to demonstrate stem cell activation. It is claimed that skin stem cells increased 2-3 fold on the mice. It was only tested on human skin for a 10-minute before and after. There are no independent trials of polypetide 153.

I hope polypeptide 153 does work because it is one of only two active ingredients in Amatokin. The other is the synthetic peptide that mimics snake venom to reduce muscular movement and, consequently, the expressions that cause wrinkles. This is called syn-ake and is in such creams and Defy Time.

Incidentally, Amatokin is not made in United Cosmeceuticals GmbH (they only make the peptide), but by the same group of companies that make StriVectin (another one ingredient wonder).

Related articles

Dr Perricone and stem cell cream

Defy Time and syn-ake

Planet Skincare and syn-ake