Part 3 of 4.

So far we have learned that there just might be a scent to aging. And that there are certain scents, too, that will enhance penile blood flow in men and make women feel better about themselves. But what are those scents? And what are they in the Ageless anti-aging perfume?

According to (some would say controversial) research undertaken by Alan Hirsch, a Chicago neurologist, at the Smell and Taste Treatment and Research Foundation, these scents are:

(% equaling average increase in penile blood flow)

Lavender and pumpkin pie, 40%
Doughnut & black licorice, 31.5%
Pumpkin pie & doughnut, 20%
Orange, 19.5%
Lavender & doughnut, 18%
Black licorice and cola, 13%
Black licorice, 13%
Doughnut & cola, 12.5%
Lily of the valley, 11%
Buttered popcorn, 9%
Vanilla, 9%
Musk, 7.5%
Green Apple, 3.8%
Rose, 3.5%
Strawberry, 3.5%
Oriental Spices, 3.5%
Floral, 3.0%
Pink Grapefruit, 2.5%

And what are they in the Ageless anti-aging perfume scent composition? Top Notes. As to the marketing claims, "the blended tropical flavors of pineapple, mango and leafy greens have been known to bring a feeling of comfort often associated with positive childhood memories, thus giving a sense of coziness, youth and joy."

These include: Apple, Pink Grapefruit, Pomegranate, Mango, and Pineapple.

Well, so far the top notes don't have much "clinical evidence" supporting enhancement of the male sexual response. The scent with the highest level of sexually enhanced male response was orange, at 19.5%, (although that's not even included in this formula) followed by green apple and pink grapefruit, which at 3.8% and 2.5%, respectively, are the only fragrances found in the top notes that turn up in this study (and they're quite at the bottom of the list).

But then again, I can kind of understand how such fruity fragrances as pomegranate, mango and pineapple et al could evoke certain positive childhood memories (especially if you grew up in Hawaii), and thus would set my male suitors more at ease in my presence (and perhaps help them make the leap to seeing me as a potentially good mate and suitable mother).

Middle notes. "Scientists at Rutgers University have actually conducted behavioral research to prove that flowers and floral prints actually improve our emotional health. Their research shows that the mere presence of flowers triggers happy emotions, heightens feelings of life satisfaction and affects social behavior in a positive manner far beyond what was normally believed." 

These include: Cherry Blossom, Jasmine, Lily of the Valley, and Peony.

There's a lot of strong anecdotal evidence behind jasmine's aphrodisiac effects. Cleopatra is said to have wooed Antony with jasmine oil, and Italian brides have been known to wear this fragrance for luck and success. Beyond that, the more "clinical" research suggests that it triggers beta waves in the front of the head, which stimulates alertness, and has been found by Dr. Hirsch to "exert an effect on a female hormones and to boost confidence." In the list of top fragrances shown to increase the male sexual response, however, it comes in not at all.

Like jasmine, most floral scents have a similarly positive background. As reported by The Sense of Smell Institute: "Floral odors elicited more positive emotion words than other kinds of pleasant odors. Floral bouquets elicited more positive social displays, like getting hugged, than other types of gifts. All floral aromas significantly reduced the use of anxious words in recalled recent memory, while in a recalled dream, jasmine and hyacinth elicited significantly more positive words than the other odors."

As to another floral scent found in the Ageless perfume, Lily of the Valley has been found to increase wakefullness and help you stay alert. Compared to floral scents in general (at 3%), Lily of the Valley exerts an 11% increase to the male sexual response

Base. Completing "the achieving powerful euphoric properties [and] setting off a feeling of youth and excitement."

These include: Precious Woods, Musk, and Vanilla

While I haven't found out that much yet on the sexualizing effects of precious wood, (although sandlewood has traditionally been considered an aphrodisiac), I did find a few smatterings about vanilla. In times past, for example, vanilla was used in an elixir to increase male potency... perhaps a correlation between Dr. Hirsch's results, which found that older men responded more strongly to vanilla than younger men.

Musk, on the other hand, has a robust portfolio and is thought to be the top fragrance for attracting members of the opposite sex. In turns out, though, that women's sensitivity to musk is 1000 times greater than a man, and so is much more likely to arouse the woman wearing the musk than any potential male partners. However, by making a woman feel more sensual, the perfume may affect her behavior and thus indirectly increase her attractiveness.

And that's it for now. I'll let you know the results of my own real-world tests soon!

Related posts:

Will a fragrance fool men into thinking you're younger than you are?

The science of scent: increasing penile blood flow, making women feel better about themselves

A perfume to aid in the art of seduction