The last decade brought us some transforming skincare ingredients and even makeup manufacturers have caught the cutting edge anti-aging bug (these days any lipstick worth its salt has a sprinkling of Matrixyl). Since we published a round up of some of the ingredients to look out for at the beginning of 2009, so many new ones have emerged that it is hard to keep them all straight. Here are some of the newer kids on the beauty block.

Given that there are different types of free radical and subsets thereof, it seems logical that you’ll need more than one kind of antioxidant to help fend them off. A new ingredient called lipochroman-6 is an able scavenger of two types of free radical. According to Lipotec, who makes lipochronan-6, it does a significantly better job of fending off oxidative stress than resveratrol, the antioxidant component of grapes. It is in the newer products by Your Best Face, such as the Quench lip balm.

The tepary bean (with the posh name of phaseolus atropurpureus) is notorious for being drought resistant. It is showing great promise as an anti-cancer therapy. Recently Japanese researchers claimed that it had remarkable activities",  promoting type IV collagen and laminin 5 synthesis, and also enhanced gene expression. I have come across it one potion by Sato. Called Excellula, it features our bean under the name of siratro extract.

Tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) may start to come across your radar. It is a known antioxidant and researchers claim to have found a new fatty acid analogue, namely tetradecylselenoacetic acid (TSA), which is yet more potent. As well as being an antioxidant, it is anti-inflammatory and may hold promise for helping those with acne. TTA is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), protecting cell proteins and metabolism and, it seems, regulating the sebum that is responsible for acne. In one study, it was concluded that selective modulation of PPAR activity may be a new treatment for acne.

Marine botanicals aren't going to go away in 2010. Far from it. And my prediction is that one, in particular, will start to appear more often. Belonging to the Phaeophycae Laminariales plant family, phytessence wakame is said to have immune-stimulating, cancer preventing, anti-inflammatory, and anti-allergic properties. As well as being a Japanese super-food, phytessence wakame has demonstrated dose-dependent inhibition of the activity of hyaluronidase in vitro. Hyaluronidase is an enzyme that attacks the skin’s supply of hyaluroic acid, which improves elasticity and smoothness. By binding collagen and elastin fibers together, hyaluronic acid makes skin smooth, firm, and flexible. So far, we've only seen it in skincare products by Xtend-Life.

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an interesting ingredient that is in Skin Nutrition Cell CPR and also in DermaSilk. It is the main energy source for the majority of cellular – and muscular – functions. This includes the synthesis of DNA. Living things use ATP like a battery – storing and using energy when needed and, it seems, in complex ways (a sprinter will use ATP very differently from a marathon runner). The ATP molecule is composed of three components.  At the center is a sugar molecule, ribose (the same sugar that forms the basis of DNA).  There is a base (a group consisting of linked rings of carbon and nitrogen atoms); in this case the base is adenine. The third is a string of phosphate groups. These phosphates are the key to the activity of ATP. Research on the effects on skin is new, but very promising.

Phosphatidycholine is in one of our Best of Beauty Products of 2009, Osmosis Replenish. The only other time I have come across this is in Dior Capture R60/80. Some dermatologists are experimenting with it as an alternative to liposuction since it is believed that phosphatidycholine can target and dissolve fat cells. I mentioned it in a post on mesotherapy. Phosphatidycholine is the predominant phospholipid (something that is in all life forms) of all cell membranes and of the circulating blood lipoproteins. It is made up of glycerol and fatty acids. Phosphatidycholine contains choline (and this is the interesting part), therefore, it is a precursor to messenger molecules that go from cell to cell. And it can improve and protect cells and membrane damaged by free radicals.