I once went on a serious quest for an eye gel (as opposed to a cream) along with a reader who was prone to milia when using even the lightest creams. Gels seemed to be the only option, but the problem is that gels can be a little drying around the eyes, not a good thing if you are also trying to combat fine lines. Our haul of eye gels, missed Beautisol’s Eye Want, a peptide packed gel that I have recently been testing. It is a good product that normally I would be happy to recommend to anyone who wants a light, gel based eye product that won’t break the bank. Unfortunately though, I cannot recommend it without pointing out an important reservation.

Beautisol Eye Want ($55) has a product twin. Skin Perfection’s Peptide Eye Serum has the exact same formula and costs only $36.50. Beautisol’s packaging and branding are much nicer, but even so. I was testing Beautisol Eye Want with a view to seeing if it was worthy of joining the brand’s face serum, 99% Pure Peptide Rescue in the TIA shop (which also has a Skin Perfection twin). Plus, I've gone out of my way to expose other product twins. However, I can’t sell a “white label” formula, knowing that it has a cheaper twin. This is why I try only to offer formulas that I know are proprietary (as is, it should be noted, Beautisol’s flagship self-tanner) and get to know and, where possible, meet the makers.

Having said all that, I should say Beautisol Eye Want is – like the popular 99% Peptides - is a good mid-priced serum. I found that it deflates puffy eyes and keeps fine lines at bay. After four weeks of using it, I didn’t feel that it had made much of an improvement. But then I had come off using Your Best Face Correct and, at my age, I think its good enough that it didn’t reverse any good work that Correct has been doing. Certainly, I think that 30 and 40-somethings would enjoy using it – especially if they don’t have very dry skin and want a light, serum alternative to a cream.

A word or two on the ingredients. The peptides are the expression line inhibitors acetyl octapeptide‐3 (aka SNAP-8) and acetyl hexapeptide‐30. More interesting is  leontopodium alpinum meristem cell. Meristem cells are the growth engines of plants and edelweiss contains phytochemicals such as chlorogenic acid (antioxidant, radical scavenging), luteolin (hyaluronidase inhibition), bisabolane (anti-inflammatory) and beta sitosterol (anti-inflammatory, antibactericidal). I’ve come across this ingredient in Hydropeptide’s Hydrostem +6.

The only things not to like are an over-eager pump that dispenses enough for both eyes in one shot, the preservative sodium benzoate and retinol, which I personally find a little drying. Oh, and the fact there is a lower priced twin lurking out there.

Ingredients: Aqua (Water), Hamamelis Virginiana (Witch Hazel) Water, Alcohol Denat, Glycerin*, Acetyl Octapeptide‐3, Acetyl Hexapeptide‐30, Leontopodium Alpinum Meristem Cell Culture, Retinol, Pseudoalteromonas Ferment Extract, Rosa Canina (Rose Hip) Fruit Oil*, Betula Alba (Birch) Bark Extract, Beta‐Glucan (D), Tocotrienols, Tocopherol (D‐alpha), Arginine, Lavandula Angustifolia (Lavender) Oil, Santalum Austrocaledonicum (Sandalwood) Wood Oil, Cymbopogon Martini (Palmarosa) Oil, Jasminum Officinale (Jasmine) Oil, Cyclodextrin, Elaeis Guineensis (Palm) Oil, Xanthan Gum, Gluconolactone, Sodium Benzoate *Certified Organic