Biobliss Anti-Wrinkle Patch for Forehead

Reviewed by Marta on March 17, 2014

0 Comments

When I first saw Biobliss, my eyebrows shot up my forehead in disbelief, exacerbating the unsightly forehead wrinkles that this anti-aging product is meant to help eliminate. Biobliss are microcurrent patches that are stuck to the forehead or crow’s feet. I was skeptical about the very notion of a microcurrent patch and at $80 for a month’s supply, they seemed expensive (compared to a microcurrent device that costs 3-4 times as much and will potentially last a few years. The only way to find out if Biobliss would be a patch on “real” microcurrent was to give it a try.

I bought a month’s supply of Biobliss Anti-Wrinkle Patch for Forehead ($80), which consists of four patches. Biobliss says that the patches are “embedded with tiny batteries and infused with hyaluronic acid, plant extracts and vitamins”. The patches self-adhere and are supposed to be worn for 30 minutes once a week and then discarded.

With a handheld microcurrent device, a subsensory electric current delivers a pulse to the facial muscles and stimulates them and the surrounding tissue. The theory is that microcurrent improves the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the chemical in muscles that provides energy. I have experienced good results with other microcurrent devices such as Myotone Facial Toning Device ($279).

Biobliss doesn’t purport to do any of this. Instead, the microcurrent in the patches is supposed to help deliver wrinkle-fighting ingredients into the skin. According to Biobliss, their patches work on the same principle as other transdermal drugs such as a nicotine or estrogen patch. This is all plausible; microcurrent skin patches have been used for pain control and have done quite well in studies.

Curious to see what the “embedded tiny batteries” looked like, I dissected one of my patches and found two small batteries within. On the subject of construction, the patches are fairly sturdy and remain in place on the forehead with a little extra pressing from time to time.

But since the point is that they are helping anti-wrinkle ingredients penetrate, the most important question is what are the ingredients infused in the Biobliss patches? There are two that inhibit the formation of expression lines — one is a plant extract that is a muscle relaxant (acmella oleracea) and the other is a synthentic peptide. Another botanical extract, albiza julibrissin, remains a bit of a mystery although I did find a reference to it being used to reduce swelling. Overall, with a couple of vitamins and hyaluronic acid, the Biobliss formula isn’t too bad.

That is, if you are prepared to overlook a form of acrylic acid, or methyldiethanolamine and polyvinylpyrrolidone, which are used to make the adhesive. I’m assuming that the glue doesn’t penetrate the skin or form a barrier that prevents the actives from doing so.

My beef with Biobliss is that it is overpriced. At $20 per patch for one use only is expensive given that the actives are OK, but not remarkable. $80 would get you a very decent serum that could last two to three months. A year’s supply of Biobliss patches comes to nearly a $1,000, which would buy you three Mytone microcurrent devices and leave some change for a serum. I know where I’ll put my money.