People will go to great lengths for beauty, which is part of the reason that TIA is so invested in uncovering the truth about the products that you trust and want to know more about. I’ve noticed some crazy skincare and beauty trends recently; apparently, bullfrog skin may rid your skin of free radical effects, the copper peptides in snail slime supposedly combat aging skin, and people pay hundreds of dollars to have someone apply bird poop to their faces at expensive salons across various continents.

The newest trend? Collagen marshmallows. A UK producer called Eat Yourself Beautiful has produced the supposed anti-aging food. The company claims that their special collagen-infused marshmallows can stimulate your body’s natural collagen production and even help rid you of cellulite. But, other than the fact that there is no proof to back up the company’s claims, there are concerns that the high level of sugar in the marshmallows will actually do more harm than good. Glucose syrup and corn starch (two of the main ingredients in the marshmallows) may actually lead to wrinkling and other signs of aging skin. To be honest, these marshmallows seem pretty ridiculous; a lot like that anti-aging ice cream I’ve been hearing so much about.

Unilever is teaming up with a biotech company and issued a statement saying that they are going to pursue anti-aging product development, focusing on antioxidants. A commendable mission in our view, until we saw that Unilever believes antioxidants could find their way into many of its product categories. From Dove to Ben & Jerry's even?

Still, while collagen marshmallows and bird poop facials are pretty wild and a bit repulsive, there are some trends that are downright unsafe. Take Flylashes, for example. Now, I’m all for fashion-forward thinking and creativity, but really, fake eyelashes made from fly legs just seem unsanitary. British artist Jessica Harrison caused a stir with the creation of the false lashes this past summer. Even with the FDA warning out for Latisse and the personal anecdotes of TIA readers who have used Lilash, only to grow hair in unwanted places, see pigment changes in the surrounding eye area and even have the color of their eyes change, I might still use those products over Flylashes – anything to keep me away from insect parts!

Shying away from the revolting but escalating on the danger scale is something that many women might not automatically associate with peril: the Brazilian bikini wax. Now, it would seem blatantly apparent that the Brazilian wax affects one of the, if not the most sensitive region of the body, meaning that women should proceed with caution. But millions of women seek to alter their nether regions with a little hot wax for anywhere between $50 and $150 dollars a pop, depending on the salon. While the Brazilian has obvious aesthetic appeal for some people, there are drawbacks to consider. Minor issues include bruising, pain and ingrown hairs. But some women have experienced everything from chemical burns to bleeding, both of which can result in scarring. Even worse is the possibility of infection; technicians may “double dip,” spreading disease from person to person after using tools more than once. In fact, New Jersey came very close to banning Brazilian waxes altogether after two women were hospitalized for infections following their waxes.

And speaking of beautifying the area down there, some women have started in on a new trend – Vajazzling. Yes, that’s right, if you want to go one step further than stripping your most delicate region of its hair, you can make an appointment at the Completely Bare Spa in New York City and have a technician apply Swarovski Crystals to your, um, blank canvas. According to the Completely Bare website, “accessorizing your privates is the hottest rage.” Oh, the things we’ll do for beauty.