I've been carrying around a tube of Jurlique's Calendula cream ($32, 1.4 oz) for months now, always intending to write about it, but never quite able to fully put into words the exact reasons why it's my go-to cream for just about everything

I use it for bug bites and dry skin, post-waxing irritation and burns (both from the sun and the stove), chapped skin on all parts, and any mystery ailments that I've couldn't quite been able to diagnose. Yes, I even ended up drinking it once (by accident, of course... somehow a glob of the stuff fell into by bedside water glass and the next morning I swallowed quite a mouthful).

What I can say is that it is incredibly soothing and moisturizing, and seems to clear up any minor irritation and inflammation that I've got going on. It's incredibly thick, and a bit too heavy to be used on the face except for those with the driest of skin. To apply, you'll want to warm a bit of the cream in your hands, much in the same way as you would with body butter in order to get a smooth application.

Calendula officinalis, or marigold, has been used since the 12th century for many of the same reasons that I have listed above. Most scientific evidence regarding its effectiveness as a wound-healing agent is based on animal and laboratory study. In fact, a small number of animal studies and low-quality human studies report that calendula reduces healing time and increases the strength of healed areas. However, more reliable human research is needed before any firm conclusions can be drawn.

What we do know is that it has strong anti-inflammatory, immunostimulating, antibacterial, antiviral, and antineoplastic (tumor-inducing) properties, along with many soothing attributes that have made it a common ingredient in products targeted for sensitive skin. You'll often see it in products marketed for newborns.

According to NIH, grades for the quality of the scientific evidence regarding its purported properties are as follows: radiation dermatitis: B; otitis media (ear infection): C; skin inflammation: C; and wound healing: C.

Jurlique's formula is packed with a slew of other nice homeopathic ingredients, including honey (good for wound healing), witch hazel (an antioxidant and astringent), and evening primrose oil (high in fatty acids and an antioxidant booster). In addition, macadamia seed oil, avocado oil, safflower seed oil and shea butter oil lend an added degree of richness, while aloe vera leaf extract and vitamin E up the healing factor.

If you're looking for a cheaper alternative, Boiron makes a nice drug-store version with a 4% concentration of calendula combined with petroleum.


Aqua (Water); Cetearyl Alcohol; Glycerin; Honey; Alcohol; Ceteareth-20; Cocoglycerides; Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride; Macadamia ternifolia Seed Oil; Persea gratissima (Avocado) Oil; Calendula officinalis Flower Extract; Echinacea purpurea Root Extract; Hamamelis virginiana (Witch Hazel) Extract; Prunella vulgaris (Self Heal) Flower Extract; Spilanthes acmella Flower Extract; Althaea officinalis (Marshmallow) Root Extract; Daucus carota sativa (Carrot) Root Extract; Carthamus tinctorius (Safflower) Seed Oil; Butyrospermum parkii (Shea Butter) Oil; Oenothera biennis (Evening Primrose) Oil; Aloe barbadensis Leaf Extract; Sodium Hydroxymethylglycinate; Tocopherol (Vitamin E); Lactic Acid; Citrus grandis (Grapefruit) Seed Extract; Panthenol.