The amount of time I’ve spent on a cell phone is unnerving. Staying up late talking to boyfriends, gossiping with girlfriends, calling family several times each week - I feel as though I have a cell phone perpetually glued to my ear. And it has been that way for nearly ten years, most of which were formative ones.

Which is why I can’t help but roll my eyes when my boyfriend urges me to get a headset, or at the very least to only use my phone if it’s put on speaker. His reasoning? Usually it’s the latest New York Times article being shoved in my face. But I can’t help thinking that if the damage has been done, it’s done. We live in a world that is so reliant upon technology that life as we know it would come crashing around upon us if something like cell phones or computers didn’t exist. So I’m realistic enough to admit that I’m not going to stop using my cell phone anytime soon. Though I can see my boyfriend’s argument that I’m being a bit foolish for not taking a simple precaution like using a headset.

What other precautions can I take? Well, aside from putting your phone in airplane mode (which stops electromagnetic emissions) or switching ears throughout your phone conversation in order to “spread out your exposure,” you can always try spraying yourself with Clarins Expertise 3P Screen Mist.

Marta first wrote about this product in 2009. According to Clarins, the “mist shields the skin from the effects of artificial electromagnetic waves with Rhodiola rosea and Thermus thermophilus.” The latter, when combined with glycerin, is known as Venuceane (its trade name). It is supposed to be an anti-ager, though there isn’t exactly a plethora of evidence supporting this.

Rhodiola rosea is a very interesting ingredient, in that it is a plant known “for stimulating the nervous system, decreasing depression, enhancing work performance, eliminating fatigue and preventing high altitude sickness.” I came across more than one study that supported all of these assertions, but only after I came across one or two that mentioned Rhodiola rosea as being “anticancer” did I start to be open my mind to the Clarins product. However, I couldn’t find anything to support Clarins’ claim that Rhodiola rosea (combined with Thermus thermophilus) “reinforces the barrier effect, biological protection against artificial electromagnetic waves.”

To be honest, even if I bought Clarins Expertise 3P Screen Mist, it would be pretty difficult – if not impossible – for me to give an accurate assessment of its effectiveness. However, I will keep in mind that the Advertising Standards Authority believes that the Clarins’ advertisements for this product should be banned “because the company’s claims were not backed up by any proper evidence and could lead to ‘fear and distress.’”

Now, I wouldn’t say that Clarins caused me to be fearful or particularly distressed. If any entity were going to put me into that sorry state, it would be the World Health Organization, which is the institute that classified cell phones as being possibly carcinogenic in the first place.

Then again, the WHO’s addition of cell phones to its growing list of things that may cause cancer isn’t so scary. After all, the list includes coffee, working the night shift, and pickled vegetables. If we can survive those, we may just be able to survive cell phones. It’s about moderation, people.

Since I exercise no moderation when it comes to cell phone usage, though, I’ll probably just buy that headset and call it a day.

Water, rosemary leaf water, butylene glycol, sodium chloride, thermus thermophillus ferment, sodium lauroyl sarcosinate, lapsana communis extract, camellia sinensis leaf extract, biosaccharide gum-4, rhodiola rosea root extract, biotin, phenoxyethanol, disodium EDTA, potassium sorbate, glycerin, pentylene glycol.