I’m not sure what Clearchoice TCA Moisture Peel is, but I’d use it again.

My medicine cabinet now boasts a careful selection of TIA-reviewed facial serums and masks, many of which I’ve commented on, and all of which have delivered (often different) benefits in several areas—clarity, pigmentation, wrinkling and fine lines, pore size, exfoliation, etc.  I wasn’t sure what to expect when TIA offered me the Clearchoice TCA Moisture Peel (sold through physicians' offices) to test and review.

And my expectations weren’t especially clarified by other TIA articles.  In Sarah K’s interesting interview with Dermastart’s founder—Clearchoice is the physician’s office line (alongside its consumer brand)—the TCA Moisture Peel is described as good for rosacea (which I don’t have) and “menopausal women” (not sure what that means!), as well as addressing uneven skin tone and suitable for use both pre- and post- doctors’ office procedures.  JustD reviewed it looking for a solution to uneven pigmentation, and gave it a cautious endorsement, reporting some, but not really significant, results.

Pump in hand, I followed instructions, using the Moisture Peel every evening for five nights after cleansing (actually I went for seven, on the old “more must be better” theory that I am sadly vulnerable to), followed by…. absolutely nothing else. I didn’t even take the Sirius Aurora LED out for a spin.  Mornings, as suggested, I used my usual products (serum, moisturizer, eye cream).

What happened?  At first, I didn’t think much.  The effects of the product were subtle, but after a couple of days reminded me of my experiences with physician’s-office (glycolic) peels that I used to get regularly a decade ago, in my forties. My face felt smoother and tighter (I mean that in a good way).  The texture seemed improved, and discolorations had faded a bit:  overall skin tone seemed more even.  These were not, I want to be clear, dramatic changes, but rather incremental improvements.  I also experienced a bit of flaking on my face—a side effect I also recall from my experiences with glycolic peels.

I finished this course a couple of days ago.  I’ve put the pump aside for now but I’m inclined to try it again in a month or six weeks’ time; I suspect that (like physician peels) this may work cumulatively, and that repeating will reinforce and increase results.  I can also imagine that this product would work well, as apparently intended, in conjunction with doctors-office procedures and treatments to magnify their impact.

I’m still not sure precisely what problem TCA Moisture Peel is intended to solve, but I think it may represent a (milder, and so less potent) home alternative to a doctors’-office peel.  I do feel confident saying that it was gentle enough to use for a week in that fashion.  My experiences suggest it’s worth another try.

Related posts: What is TCA and how does it work

Ingredients in TCA Moisture Peel: Acqua, organic aloe vera gel, USP glycerin, trichloroacetic acid, vitamin B5, l-carnosine, vitamin E, lecithin, retinyl palmitate, sodium hyaluronate, squalane, NAPCA, chamomile, kojuc acid, alpha arbutin, sage extract, eyebright, magnesium ascorbyl phosphate, grapeseed extract