Dr. Howard Sobel founded the HDS Cosmetic Lab in 1991 and was later joined by his sister to help expand retail distribution. In 1995, the brand’s name was changed to DDF, which stands for Doctor’s Dermatologic Formula. The brand then developed it’s mantra of ‘Cleanse. Protect. Treat. Dr. Sobel claims to be among the first to author the first articles on the benefits of growth factors, proteins and peptides.

In 2007, DDF was acquired by Procter & Gamble, though Dr. Sobel and his sister still serve as consultants to the brand.

The Good:

Dr. Sobel boasts about DDF's inclusion of scavenol, an antioxidant he claims is 100 times more potent than EGCG from green tea, and acai berry, a rich source of anthocyanins. Other ingredients include aminopropyl ascorbyl phosphate and niacinamide, which is vitamin B3, and the standard salicylic acid and benzoyl peroxides in their acne line of products.

The Bad:

Ingredients don’t meet our expectations. DDF contains ingredients like silicones and undecylenoly phenylalanine which isn’t the best for your body. The latter is a pollutant.

The Truth:

Marta was on the fence about DDF's Discoloration Reversal Pods, which had a lot of interesting ingredients, but some that she wished the brand had avoided as well. In particular: active whitening ingredient undecylenoly phenylalanine, which is a pollutant and irritant. Summar wasn't entirely sold on DDF's 10% Glycolic Exfoliating Control Gel, which seemed to help moderately break-outs at bay, but did nothing for oil control or reduction of pore size. Marta sent the Wrinkle Resist Plus Pore Minimizer to TIA's department of daft because it seemed more like the product of marketing department lingo than anything else. And though Marta liked that DDF's Organic Sun Protection SPF 30 had acetyl cysteine and genistein, an antioxidant, there were a couple of silicones she would have preferred to have been excluded.  Overall, DDF seems to consistently just miss our mark of approval.