I have always had freckled skin. Now a couple of them are merging together. That's been my story for a while, but now I may be forced to admit that they are the first emerging age spots. Although I am still slightly in denial, I have started to tune my antenna to spot an age spot, pigmentation product. I alighted on a brand new one from DDF called Discoloration Reversal Pod.

I am, as I write this, uncharacteristically on the fence. There is a lot to like in these little pods. At the same time there are a couple of things that I would rather avoid. The pod business is one of them. There seems to be a new fashion for packaging cosmetics in micro doses. As far as I can tell, all this does is create more plastic that we have to throw away.

The other thing that makes me wary of going straight to Amazon's One-Click, is that the active whitening ingredient, undecylenoly phenylalanine, is an irritant and a pollutant, according to the Material Safety Data Sheet. It is also the active ingredient in Skin White Bleaching Cream, known as the Michael Jackson cream (the makers of this actually mention it in their marketing blurb, which is surely misguided on their part). There is also another couple of irritants, including DMDM hydantoin and iodopropynyl butylcarbamate.

Nevertheless, DDF Discoloration Reversal Pods include a new super vitamin C derivative called aminopropyl ascorbyl phosphate and niacinamide, which is vitamin B3. There are clinical trials that show that niacinamide is helpful at mitigating against the effects of UV light because of its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties. However, it must be noted that those trials were sponsored by Proctor & Gamble.

There are loads of other vitamins and anti-oxidants in these pods, including acetylcysteine, thioctic acid, tea, vitamin B12, vitamin E and retinyl palmitate.

I shall scan for alternatives for a bit longer, but I might end up giving this a try.