I never thought that I would ever find a Dior (a bland, department store brand if ever there was one) cosmetic product interesting enough to write about. But Dior has got my attention with its Dior Hydra Life Pro-Youth Sorbet Eye Crème ($49). Sure, my eyes glaze over at the first handful of ingredients with all those copolymers, silicone and – unforgivable – phenoxyethanol (a nasty toxin that belongs way down the end of the list, if at all). But then there is a huge surprise. Moringa oil.

I am fascinated by moringa, an amazing botanical antioxidant that is all too rare in cosmetic products. I am waging a one-woman campaign to change that because the moringa tree is packed with an abundance of potassium, iron, vitamin A and other nutrients, it is quite remarkable. Its leaves (which, unusually for a tree, are pure protein), pods and flowers have seven times the vitamin C found in oranges, four times the vitamin A of carrots and three times the potassium of bananas. Some people believe that if you planted enough of them, moringas could be the solution for world hunger. In addition to all of this, moringa seeds (pictured above) have been used for centuries to purify water. I could go on and on about moringa but will just add that it contains six antioxidants and 36 anti-inflammatories.

This has just given me the thought that I should add some moringa oil (I happen to have a bottle somewhere) to the Concentrate that Your Best Face made for us, expressly for the purpose of indulging such whims. Concentrate is a combo of three high impact antiaging ingredients that can be mixed with other things to make your own cosmetic concoctions (in the TIA shop for $45).

Anyway, back to Dior. Hydra Life Pro-Youth Sorbet Eye Crème has a couple of other botanicals that you don’t see everywhere. Opuntia ficus-indica is a kind of cactus and its fruits, some of you may be interested to note, are a hangover cure. More pertinent for an eye cream is the fact that recent studies have  shown the extracts to have antioxidant properties and reduce DNA damage. More controversial is the inclusion of ajuga turkestanica, a plant from Central Asia that boosts moisture by boosting aquaporin-3 (AQP3), a protein that facilitates the transport of moisture and glycerol. This would seem to be a good thing, but a doctor has linked AQP3 to cancer.

Despite all of this, I’m not rushing off to buy Dior Hydra Life Pro-Youth Sorbet Eye Crème. The good is pretty much outweighed by the fillers and inventive though the formulator has been in tracking down interesting plants, he seems to have a germ phobia that manifests itself in no less than six preservatives.

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Ingredients

Aqua (Water), Glycerin, Ethylene/Acrylic Acid Copolymer, Pentylene Glycol, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Phenyl Trimethicone, Butylene Glycol, Betaine, Phenoxyethanol, Glyceryl Oleate Citrate, Acrylates/C10-30 Alkyl Acrylate Crosspolymer, Rosa Hybrid Flower Extract, Moringa Pterygosperma Seed Oil, Polyacrylamide, C13-14 Isoparaffin, Sodium Hydroxide, Disodium Edta, Tocopheryl Acetate, Glyceryl Acrylate/Acrylic Acid Copolymer, Dimethicone/Phenyl Vinyl Dimethicone Crosspolymer, Centella Asiatica Leaf Extract, Steareth-20, Parfum (Fragance), Xanthan Gum, Laureth-7, Biosaccharide Gum-2, Malva Sylvestris (Mallow) Extract, Hydrolyzed Opuntia Ficus-Indica Flower Extract, Potassium Sorbate, N-Hydroxysuccinimide, Hyaluronic Acid, Sodium Hyaluronate, Ethylhexylglycerin, Sodium Citrate, Ajuga Turkestanica Extract, Tocopherol, Palmitoyl Oligopeptide, Chrysin, BHT, Citric Acid, Palmitoyl Tetrapeptide-7, Biotin.