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D’OR 24K Bio Thermal Serum

D'OR 24K Consigned to Dept of Daft

Reviewed by Marta April 26, 2016 4 Comments

The French word for gold is “or.” D’OR 24K translates as fool’s gold. At least if you’ll allow me some linguistic license and once you’ve take a look at this cosmetic brand with me, I think you’ll agree that it is a prime candidate for the Dept. of Daft.

I was asked in all seriousness by a reader what I thought about D’OR 24K and up until this enquiry I have to admit I hadn’t heard of it. Perhaps because I don’t qualify as one of the “discerning” people that make up the D’OR clientele. Or because I don’t shop in the world’s “most expensive chain stores and spas,” where D’OR boasts that its products are sold. This is marketing that would have Bernie Sanders foaming at the mouth.

When I saw D’OR prices, I was astounded — especially when I looked at the ingredients. Let’s start with the D’OR 24K Bio Thermal Mask at $1,675. It’s good to know that wealthy, discerning types are cool about typos. There are more misspelled words in this brand’s ingredients lists than you’d find on test day at a middle school. For fun, I’ve left them in (see below). I imagine that “Kaolm” is kaolin, a common clay. Common extends to most of the ingredients since green tea, phosphholipid [sic] and acetyl hexpetide [sic] amongst others are perfectly respectable but can be found in potions that cost a tenth of the price, or less, than Bio Thermal Mask.

Of course, this D’OR mask does contain gold and discerning types might be forgiven for assuming that this precious ingredient justifies the audacious price point. Alas, gold might be pricey, but isn’t very convincing in skin care. In fact, it may even be dangerous as some researchers claim that large nanoparticles of gold are toxic and colloidal gold has been found to suppress cell’s abilities to contract collagen. In 2001, it was named “allergen of the year” by the American Contact Dermatitis Society.

The similarly typo-packed ingredient list of the D’OR 24K Bio Thermal Serum ($1,150) also boasts South Sea pearl and caviar. The jury on pearl as an anti-ager is still out. Proponents (documented in the Journal of Cell biology) say that conchilion (the thing in pearls that makes them pearly) acts like the protein keratin (which is found in skin, bones and hair), and has the ability to hydrate skin cells, promote skin cell metabolism, facilitate repair of damaged skin cells, and enhance peripheral circulation. Most observers say more research is needed.

Caviar, discerning types might be disappointed to learn, is fish eggs with a fancy name. They are a source of arginine and omega 3s, but more of the latter can be found in flax seed. In any case, caviar is in hundreds of beauty products, even shampoo.

A relative bargain is the gold-infused 24K Vitamin C Serum at $895. This time someone ran a spell-check and even tetrahexyldecyl ascorbate, a potent and stable form of vitamin C, escaped being scrambled. Although the formula isn’t terrible, the best of its ingredients such as ferulic acid, green tea and sodium hyaluronate are ubiquitous in much more reasonably priced products.

At this point you might be wondering why discerning types would pay so much for these products. The D’OR 24K website sums it up: “It is not just a product, it is D’OR 24K Gold edition.”

Priceless.

Ingredients in Bio Thermal Mask:

Purified Water, Glycerin, Sorbital, Vitamin E, Bentonite, Aluminum Magnesium Silicate, Kaolm, Sun ower Oil, Caviar, Grape Seed Oil, Gold, Green Tea Extract, Phosphholipid, Tocopheryl Acetate, Retinyl Palmitate, Acetyl Hexpeptide 3, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Wheat Protein, Bearbery Extract, Retinyl Palmitate, Ginkjo Biloba, South Sea Pearl, Phenoxyethanol, Diazolidiny Urea, Kimona Flower Extract.

Ingredients in Bio Thermal Serum:

Purified Water, Caviar, Barbadensis Leaf Juice (Active Aloe-Extract), GOLD,Green Tea Extract, Caprylic, Capric Triglyceride, South Sea Pearl, ACETYL Hexpeptide 3, C12-C15 Alkyl Benzoate, Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea Butter), Cumumis Sativus, Ascorbyl Plamitate, Green Tea,Tocopherol Acetate, Hydroyzed Wheat Protein, Palmitoyl Tetrapeptide-7, Phenoxyelhnol, Drazolidinyl Urea Retinyl Palmitate, Cetearyl Olivate, Vitamin E, Ceteareth-20, Phosphholipid, Tocopheryl Acetate, Retinyl Palmitate, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Wheat Protein, Bearbery Extract, Ginkjo Biloba, South Sea Pearl, Phenoxyethanol, Diazolidiny Urea, Poly-Acrylamide,Kimona Flower Extract.

Ingredients in Vitamin C Serum:

Water/Aqua/, Collagen, 24K Gold, Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate, Green, Caprylyl Methicone, Hydrogenated Lecithin, Behenyl Alcohol, Benzyl Alcohol, Squalane, Green Tea Extract, Rosmarinus Officinalis (Rosemary) Leaf Extract, Ferulic Acid, Simmondsia Chinensis (Jojoba) Seed Oil, Sodium Hyaluronate, Polysorbate 20, Xanthan Gum, Beta-Glucan, Fragrance/Parfum, Sorbitol, Limonene, Stearyl Glycyrrhetinate, Disodium EDTA, Elaeis Guineensis (Palm) Oil, Tocotrienols, Linalool, Tocopherol, Citral, Citronellol

  • May 4, 2016

    by Don

    @Joe Hautelook is notorious for stuff like that! I almost got duped into buying some no name French Skincare brand that was selling products for 96% off the $1,997 serum: then I read the ingredients list and it was basically the same as a CVS brand serum! Oh and that expensive brand? At least no typos!! I think the misspelling is is what makes this d' Or 24k laughably sad. I am thinking that this is just gold spray paint....Thanks Marta as usual :;

  • April 28, 2016

    by Joe

    This is a brand designed basically for deep discounting and making them look like "crazy" bargains -- like that $1650 serum might be "92% off" at $132 (WHAT A BARGAIN!) You'll see them on the major "flash sale" sites like HauteLook. I am hoping no one buys them at full price (or even the flash sale prices).

    It's a pretty big scam.

  • April 26, 2016

    by Cheryl Candice

    Kudos to Martha for being such a diligent person. you're not only saving us money, you are saving our skins as well as lives. YIKES! these people are cruel. it shows how important it is for us to READ what is in every "Miracle Potion" that we hear of, not just buy stuff.

  • April 26, 2016

    by Helene

    Thank you Marta, for telling it like it is! How utterly idiotic that someone would buy into this nonsense! Makes you wonder sometimes how some of the insanely rich got that way! Not because of smarts, that's for sure!

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