As soon as I realized that QVC favorite, Dr Denese, is Hungarian, I sent off for a bottle of the WrinkleRX Extreme Pro-Peptide Gel. I have a completely unproven theory that Hungarians are the best in the world at skincare. My lovely esthetician, Ildi Pekar, is living proof that while we were all slathering on Estee Lauder, they were inside the communist bloc with nothing in the shops and forced to make their own cosmetics - learning a lot in the process.

As I await the arrival of WrinkleRX Extreme Pro-Peptide Gel ($64), I confess to mixed feelings about it. There is a lot of silicone - rather too much for my taste. However, you can't dispute that this potion packs in an impressive panoply of peptides. And, if Dr Denese is to be believed, they are all complementary and in meaningfully high doses.

She's not being stingy with the vitamin C or A either. For a start there is retinol palmitate/carrot polypeptide. This is a uniquely water soluble form of vitamin A, supposedly similar to the form in which it occurs in carrot juice. Apparently, this increases absorption and reduces irritation potential.

dr-denese-wrinklerxI can't find any information on caproyl tetrapeptide-3 and so have to assume that it is a close cousin of palmitoyl-tetrapeptide, which is an anti-inflammatory that works by supressing the interleukins. A peptide that is also new to me is acetyl tetrapeptide-11, which is supposed to boost the synthesis of syndecan-1. Syndecan-1 functions as a transmembrane protein that contributes to cell proliferation, cell migration and cell-matrix interactions.

I am back on firmer ground with tripeptide-1, a synthetic peptide that contains glycerine, histidine and lysine. And, of course, we all know that acetyl hexapeptide-8 is the one that limits the movement of facial muscles. Then there is our good friend Matrixyl 3000.

There is much more to Dr Denese's WrinkeRX Extreme Pro-Peptide Gel than synthetic peptides. There is also astaxanthin and, listed separately although it is from whence astanxanthin is ususally derived, maematococcus pluvialis. and some interesting botanicals including antioxidant zizyphus jujuba, apple stem cell (which I have written about and remain slightly dubious), and skin brightening licorice root.

Despite a little trepidation - I really wish there wasn't ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate, which is a sunscreen that kills skin cells, or potentially irritating potassium hydroxide and sodium bisulfite - I am interested to see how Dr Denese performs. I will, of course, report back.

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Water, Cyclomethicone, Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate (Vitamin C), Glycereth-26, Ascorbyl Glucoside, Methyl Ether Dimethyl Silane, Retinol Palmitate/Carrot Polypeptide, Dimethicone/Vinyl Dimethicone Crosspolymer, Caproyl Tetrapeptide-3, Tripeptide-1, Acetyl Hexapeptide-8, Acetyl Tetrapeptide-11, Palmitoyl Tripeptide-5, Palmitoyl Oligopeptide, Palmitoyl Tetrapeptide-7, Euterpa Oleracea (Acai) Fruit Extract, Sodium Hyaluronate, Malus Domestica Fruit Cell Culture (Botanical Stem Culture from Plant Stem), Polysilicone-1 7, Dimethicone, Glycerin, Tocopherol, Tocopheryl Acetate, Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Extract, Dipotassium Glycyrrhizate, Dimethicon/Vinyl Dimethicone Crosspolymer, Haematococcus Pluvialis Extract, Astaxanthin, Lonicera Caprifolium (Honeysuckle) Flower Extract, Zizyphus Jujuba Fruit Extract, Glycyrrhiza Glabra (Licorice) Root Extract, Citrus Aurantium Amara (Bitter Orange) Peel Oil, Lecithin, Dextran, Butylene Glycol, Guanidine HCL, Lysolecithin, Glucose, Xanthan Gum, Carbomer, Polyglyceryl-10 Oleate, Polyglyceryl-10 Stearate, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Polysorbate 20, Potassium Hydroxide, Citric Acid, Ethylhexyl Methoxycinnamate, Sodium Bisulfite, Disodium EDTA, Phenoxyethanol, Caprylyl Glycol