Close up of a woman's eye with dots of eye cream under it

Discovering really good eye creams and serums isn’t easy when my bar is high. I already have a roster of greats including an epidermal growth factor eye serum from AQ, and the latest in peptides and antioxidants from Your Best Face and E’shee. Still a girl can keep looking. I spent some time looking at around eight interesting eye serums, see below for my rejects and the four that I have selected to try out.


Bioderma Sensibio Eye

Drew Barrimore was alerted to this French pharmacy brand by a makeup artist, or so she said in a recent magazine article. It was enough to send me off to take a look. The formulator has something of a sweet tooth, but not in a bad way. One of the ingredients is fructooligosaccharides that, although it is commonly used as an artificial sweetener, has skin benefits, especially for troubled and inflamed skin. So does rhamnose, another sugar, that also has the ability to boost collagen and elastin. Yet another sugary item is mannitol, although it doesn’t have much benefit. Some of the other ingredients are less sweet. Tridecyl trimellitate is listed in Canada as a toxin. With alcohol, acrylates, silicone and toxic preservatives, it is ultimately a pass.

Rodial Dragon’s Blood Eye Gel ($56)

The vivid red of this eye gel was compelling and dragon’s blood seems to be one of those trending anti-aging ingredients right now. The base is rose water, Matrixyl 3000 is at the end of the list and algae. Unfortunately, there’s enough silicone here to do a breast implant, not to mention synthetic emollients and irritants such as triethanolamine.

Shiseido Future Solution LX ($130)

Back in my 30s and 40s, Shiseido was my go-to brand to combat those early signs of aging. This eye cream makes me very glad that I’ve moved on. The best thing that Shiseido can find to brag about is that it has polymers that form a net over the skin for temporary filling. Despite my better judgment, I am always checking out Shiseido as they have an intriguing proprietary ingredient called piperidineropionic acid, a kind of amino acid that inhibits a protein that causes rough skin. It’s here alright, but so is mineral oil and petrolatum and so many other unpleasant or useless ingredients that playing hunt the antioxidant just isn’t worth it.

Zelens Triple Action Advanced Eye Cream ($100)

This British doctor brand launched controversially a few years ago with a serum that contained fullerenes. This stoked up such a rumpus that Dr Z dropped it. But it left me with the lasting impression that he was willing to go out a limb and so I check him out from time to time. This eye cream doesn’t disappoint with the daring use of a soil bacteria called sinohizobium meliloti. Here it is in fermented form and is supposed to synthesise elastin. Unfortunately, there’s not much else to get excited about. Peptides are at the end of the ingredient list. Harsh preservatives have been used with a heavy hand.

Selected for testing

Niod Fractionated Eye Contour Concentrate ($68)

I have to confess that I find the conceit of Niod’s strapline, Skincare for the Hyper-Educated, amusing. But there’s nothing funny about this eye serum. It looks to be punching way above its price tag with tons of peptides, antioxidants such as niacinamide and superoxide dismutase, copper, zinc, vitamins, snail toxin…. The list goes on and on. The packaging is minimalist chic from a Canadian brand that could be worth going back to school for.

Oskia Eye Wonder

I am excited to have stumbled across this UK brand with a strong focus on MSM. This is an ingredient that I have recently come to understand the merits of, as it is essential for the connective tissue in skin. Oskia also has a natural bent and has included, for example, Galactoarabinan, a natural and gentle exfoliant. With niacinamide, apple stem cells and only a dab of phenoxyethanol to dislike, this looks very much up TIA’s street.

Verso Super Eye Serum ($80)

There’s a couple of interesting things going on here. One is tetrahydropiperine (THP), which is derived from piperine, the compound in black peppercorns that makes them peppery. The other is tetrahydrodiferuloylmethane, a skin brightener/whitener from turmeric. In addition, turmeric has been added as ingredient in its own right for full antioxidant power. A helpful peptide is dipeptide-2, which is supposed to help de-puff as well as promote the skin’s amino acid uptake. It is an antioxidant and penetration enhancer. The base ingredients, glycerin and heptyl undecylenate, which is castor oil, are less exciting. Preservatives include BHT and phenoxyethanol, but this could be worth checking out.

Bakel Cool Eyes ($110)

This brand looks interesting with a compact list of natural ingredients and peptides. This roller-ball eye serum has a witch hazel base with nourishing cocoa seed and argan oil. Hesperidin tackles dark circles and dipeptide-2 depuffs. There’s really nothing to dislike in this formula, but only testing will tell if the price tag is justified.

As always, I welcome suggestions - so if it is on your radar, make sure it is on the TIA community's, and leave a comment.