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Five Best products that contain matrixyl 3000

February 28, 2013 Reviewed by Marta 175 Comments

UPDATE: Read our 2014 Five Best with Matrixyl and Matrixyl 3000.

One of the most frequently searched terms on Truth In Aging is matrixyl 3000. This antioxidant is made by combining two peptides, palmitoyl oligopeptide and palmitoyl tetrapepide-7. It outperforms Vitamin C (and unlike some of the Cs, it doesn't irritate) by stimulating the matrix molecules - collagens 1,3, 4 and fibronectin to reduce the appearance of wrinkles. According to clinical trials, matrixyl 3000 led to a 33% decrease in wrinkle density, a 23% decrease in the volume of wrinkles and a 20% decrease in the depth of wrinkles.

The only problem is that this research was conducted by Sederma, the manufacturer of matrixyl 3000, and I haven't been able to find any independent research. Still, assuming that it is a good antioxidant, it is worth rounding up Truth In Aging's picks for the Five Best products that contain matrixyl 3000.

1. Bellaplex (usually $89, Bellaplex 1oz can be bought for $43 at Amazon.com). Bellaplex is another potion that keeps it simple. In addition to matrixyl 3000, it has Arguireline (for preventing expression lines), sodium hyaluronate (moisture retention) and DMAE (firming). A popular reader choice. 

2. Isomers Matrixyl 3000 Rejuvenation Serum ($30). For a largely unadulterated matrixyl 3000 experience, it doesn't get much better than this. There is glycerin and linseed oil and not much else. For the full ingredients of this and the rest of the Five Best , scroll to the bottom of the page.

3. Your Best Face Correct ($150). Regular readers of Truth In Aging will know that YBF Correct is my new favorite eye cream. It has made a visible difference by eliminating some of the fine lines around my eyes. It contains matrixyl 3000, but doesn't rely on it. The other important anti-ager in Correct is spin trap, a clever little molecule that traps free radicals and stops them spinning out of control and causing havoc with your skin cells.

4. Nutra-Lift Rejuvenating Therapy ($51.30). Nutra-Lift has recently changed its formula for Rejuvenating Therapy to add in matrixyl 3000 for the first time. I haven't tried this, but based on reviewing the ingredients, I am sorely tempted to. Matrixyl 3000 is at a concentration of 5% and Nutra-Lift has also jammed in an impressive number of other good antioxidants including copper peptides, CoQ10, grape, tea and algae. There is also marine collagen.

5. Cellbone Super AOX ($72 but currently on promotion for $36 on Cellbone's website). I have had extremely enthusiastic reports from readers claiming great results with Super AOX. This seems to be a good one for men. It has a hefty 10% dose of matrixyl 3000. Plus there is 1% CoQ10.

Notable for its absence from Five Best products with matrixyl 3000 is Dermapril SP. While there are some good things about Dermapril, it loses points for having at least 20 filler ingredients that won't do much, if anything, for you and there is an onerous monthly payment scheme. I just don't think Dermapril SP reprepsents good value for money.

*Note that the new version of Mychelle Supreme no longer contains matrixyl 3000 (apparently because it didn't meet Mychelle's standards of hygiene), so we haven't included it here. Myself and a reader are currently testing the new formulation of Supreme and we'll report back soon.

Ingredients in Isomers Matrixyl 3000: Water/Aqua, Linum Usitatissimum (Linseed) Seed Extract, Glyceryl Polymethacrylate, Propylene Glycol, Glycerin, Butylene Glycol, Carbomer, Polysorbate 20, Palmitoyl Oligopeptide, Palmitoyl Tetrapeptide-7, Methylparaben, Propylparaben.

Ingredients in YBF Correct reverse osmosis water, licorice root extract, snap-8 (acetyl glutamyl hexapeptide-3), pepha-timp (polypeptide), cucumber extract, simugel (C16H34), syn-ake (tripeptide), haloxyl (hydroxysuccinimide, chrysin, palmitoyl oligopeptide (and) palmitoyl tetrapeptide-3), nutmeg butter, matrixyl 3000 (palmitoyl oligopeptide, palmitoyl tetrapeptide-3), dimethyl isosorbide, alpha arbutin, cyclomethicone (and) dimethicone copolyol, ethyhexyl palmitate, spin trap (phenyl butyl nitrone), glycerine, l-proline, provitamin B5, raspberry seed extract, alpha lipoic acid, sepilift DPHP (palmitoyl-1, palmitoyloxy-4 proline), triglyceride,
paraben du, sodium hyaluronate, caffeine, cetearyl isononanoate, ceteareth-20, cetearyl alcohol, glyceryl stearate, cetyl palmitate, ceteareth-12, vitamin e, BHT, olive leaf extract, vitamin a, violet leaf extract, oakmoss absolute

Ingredients in Bellaplex: Purified water, sesame seed oil, glycerin, silicone, Argireline (acetyl hexapeptide-3), collagen, sodium hyaluronate, matrixyl 300 (glycerin butylene glycol, water, carbomer, polysorbate 20, palmitoyl oligopeptide, palmitoyl tetrapeptide-3), DMAE, aloe vera, alpha lipoic acid, polowax pastilles, PPG-2 myristyl ether propionate, methylparaben, propylparaben.

Ingredients in Nutra-Lift Rejuventing Therapy: Certified Organic Aloe Vera Gel, Matrixyl 3000 at 5% (Palmitoyl Oligopeptide, Palmitoyl Tetrapeptide-7 PAL KTTKS), Vitamin C ester, sea kelp / algae, liposomes, astaxanthin, grape seed extract, cetyl esters, nikkomullese, co-Q10, pycogenol, natural mixed tocopherals (vitamin e), anti-oxidant complex 14, natural firming complex (dmae, alpha lipoic acid, vitamin C ester, & astaxanthin), fruit flower complex 12, herbal complex 30, plant derived polysorbate 20, hydroxyethyl-cellulose, hyaluronic acid, copper peptide, marine collagen, marine elastine, organic royal jelly, Mexican yam, green tea, active copper peptide , milk thistle, retinyl palmitate, ( vitamin A) ppg

Ingredients in Cellbone Super AOX: Water, Shea butter, Palmitoyl Oligopeptide & Terapeptide-3 (Matrixyl™-3000), Butyleneglycol, Sunflower Seed Oil, Dimethyl Isosorbide, Cocoa Butter, Coconut Oil, Emulsifying Wax, Glycerin, Tea Tree Oil,  L-Ascorbic Acid, Inca Inchi seed oil, Alpha Tocopherol, Lycopene, CoQ10,Comfrey Root Extract, Lemongrass Essential Oil, Rosemary Extract,  Caprylyl Glycol, Phenoxyethanol

  • June 10, 2013

    by Marta

    Hi Gill
    I have put together a regimen for 40-somethings that will give you some ideas. You can read it here:
    http://www.truthinaging.com/review/beauty-essentials-for-40-somethings

    Specifically to help with breakouts, I would also recommend Arcona's AM Acne Lotion http://www.truthinaging.com/arcona-am-acne-lotion

  • June 9, 2013

    by Gill

    I am 44 and suddenly feel as if I should be into a face cream regime but I am baffled as where to start. I have suffered with spots all my life though it is greatly easing now but I still have the t zone business happening. What would you recommend?

  • August 15, 2012

    by Karen

    Now I feel really silly. I hope no one read my last couple of comments. I must have missed page two of the comments that covered all the drama with Romira/Albert! Now that I've read page two, I don't think I want to know anymore. Please ignore my questions, but if you want to answer me please be kind. Thank you.

  • August 15, 2012

    by Karen

    My apologies. My earlier comment was referring to those made by Romina in 2009. I didn't realize that there were four pages worth of comments! Anyway does anyone know what ever happened to the skincare she was referring to? I glanced through the other pages and didn't find anymore reference to her. Thanks.

  • August 15, 2012

    by Karen

    Can anyone tell me if Romira came up with a skincare line? If so what is the name of her product/s? and where can one purchase them?

  • August 14, 2012

    by caroline

    I have tried everything and this Matrixyl® 3000 is in VITA-K by freeman. Dont be fooled by the price. ! I have acne scars and a bad complexion turning 41..and THIS is a miracle product that fades my scars and spots and clears my acne as well as makin my skin look and feel younger and bright..and i cannot say enough! I SWEAR to god this VITA-K cream is the best !!!

  • October 4, 2011

    by Mark

    Kevin -
    Kaplan does moisturize well and over time may help with the rough appearance under the eye area. Do let us know how you get along with the products you try - a review of them would be great and may help someone else, too.

  • October 4, 2011

    by Marta

    Hi Kevin, that's because I haven't done one. So thanks for the suggestion - consider it to be in the works!

  • October 3, 2011

    by kevin

    Hey guys I couldnt find the five best list of products that deal with firming smile lines??

  • October 1, 2011

    by kevin

    Hi Mark or Martha ,
    Do you think kaplan md will help smooth rough skin appearance under the eye?

  • September 29, 2011

    by kevin

    Thanks everyone I really appreciate it..Martha I went ahead and ordered KaplanMd. Do you think this product through hydrating will help smooth the skin under the eye as well? Mark I ordered that moisturizer thanks for the recommendation. I guess finally if anyone knew a good product to firm up smile lines I would really appreciate it thanks again -Kevin

  • September 27, 2011

    by Marta

    I think I would go with KaplanMD. But neither will be a mistake.

  • September 27, 2011

    by Howard

    Sorry All...Kevin just saw your post........I love Kaplan MD and YBF Correct...have not tried Hydropeptide although I am thinking about it
    others I have had luck with is Osmotics Eye Surgery and Teri's La Vie Celeste line.

  • September 27, 2011

    by Howard

    Since I have stuck my neck out thus far, I forgot to mention that another Excellent two-step duo is YBF Correct and Boost. Correct helped immensely with my eye dark valleys (not just circles due to chronic sinusitis)within the sample use of a week

  • September 27, 2011

    by Howard

    Please do not shoot me for this post..I have found The Art of Shaving (use the After Shave Balm Unscented personally) to be an excellent product at a fantastic price point ($38 for 100 mL retail...even more discount from SkinStore as Mark mentioned)Marta has a mini review June 10, 2009 It has proven to be an excellent two-step (add some eye cream)and you are out the door product for me. Ingredients listed are:Red Algae Gel, Shea Butter, Laminaria, Jojoba Oil, Macadamia Oil, Glycerin, Cocoyl Glucoside, Cordia Verbenacea, Wheat Amino Acids, Ginkgo Biloba, Centello Asiatica Extract, Nori, Horsetail Extract, Hyaluronic Acid, Glycosaminoglycans, Essential Fatty Acids, Grape Seed Extract, Vitamin E, Acerola (Vitamin C Complex), Amino Acids of L-Lysine & L-Methionine, Essential Oil

  • September 27, 2011

    by kevin

    I still am trying to decide between purchasing hydropeptide or Kaplan...COuld you guys weigh in on which one you thing would work best for hydrating, dark circles puffiness and smoothing ..Thanks Kevin

  • September 27, 2011

    by kevin

    Thanks guys I really appreciate it!

  • September 27, 2011

    by Mark

    Kevin - products that contain hyaluronic acid do a good job at plumping/firming. Arcona Magic White Ice moisturizer contains hyaluronic acid and I did a quick internet search and found it at "The Skin Store" for $30.40 so it's moderately priced. I also agree with Julie Kay - it will take time and patience to see results with any product, and YBF's do deliver. Also check out Marta's Five Best list - they've proven themselves, too.

  • September 27, 2011

    by Julie Kay

    Kevin- it takes patience, I'm talking a few months, but YBF Define does work on those pesky lip lines. ~jk

  • September 25, 2011

    by Kevin

    Also do you guys have a good recommendation for an affordable anti oxident moisturizer
    thanks
    KEvin

  • September 25, 2011

    by Kevin

    Thanks Mark,
    I guess the question is out of the two which one is known to deliever better results.. And on a side note do you guys know of a good moisturizer or cream that deals with firming smile lines..Mine arent too bad, but I used to smoke and I lost a little bit of weight in my face and their kinda noticable in certein lightings...thanks again ..

  • September 23, 2011

    by Mark

    Hi Kevin -
    another good choice would be KaplanMD Intensive Eye Cream - it's my go-to when others didn't measure up. It has a good medium body without being too thick or heavy and hydrates/moisturizes/plumps well and seems to help with fine lines. A little bit goes a long way, too.

  • September 22, 2011

    by Marta

    Hi Kevin - probably Dermophisiologique Optyma.

  • September 22, 2011

    by Kevin

    HI Marta,
    THanks for your time, I would be willing to spend up to $100..I have read some good things about this product so maybe I should give it a try. If their was another product for $100 that would do the same as hydropeptide but more which one would you reccommend?

  • September 21, 2011

    by Marta

    Hi Kevin, I've been pondering this. Can you stretch to Hydropeptide. I think it might work well for you. If not, try the Nutra-Lift. See this post for more information: http://truthinaging.com/eyes/five-best-eye-creams-for-less-than-65

  • September 21, 2011

    by Kevin

    Hi Marta,
    I would really appreciate it if you had a recommendation for me, because I would like to start combating these issues asap..Im sure your busy, so whenever you may have a second.
    Thanks
    Kevin

  • September 19, 2011

    by Kevin

    Thanks For the kind words Darrell..I am most definately willing to go more with a $100 eye cream I just want to know its not bogus...And if there is one that could cover hydration, smoothing, darkness and puffiness combine that would be awesome..

  • September 19, 2011

    by Darrell

    This is good to know Kevin -- thank you!

    Would love to learn more about which product of the three eye creams we products didn't work for you. It seems though, you may be saying you've sampled Nourish?

    In the event the sample you tried was our eye cream called Correct, it in particular has gone through several formula upgrades over the years. So, it might be worth trying again.

    It seems though you were looking for a budget eye cream. Of the three you listed in your post, one looks to be around $50 and the other two run between $90 and $110.

    I think with that swing from $50 to $110 you should find many good choices by a number of brands...hopefully you'll hear back, some good recommendations.

    All my best,
    Darrell

  • September 19, 2011

    by Kevin

    Hi Darell,
    I actually have briefly tried your sample and not that Its not a great product I just dont think my skin reacted well to it...Im kinda fair skinned and around this time of year my eyes become really dry...Im looking for a product that maybe even feels cool hydrating while applying..smooths and slightly deals with darkness and lines...Any thoughts anyone..I would really appreciate it
    Thanks
    KEvin

  • September 18, 2011

    by Darrell

    Kevin,
    If I may make a suggestion, send me an email. At 26, we might have an affordable eye cream (Nourish) you would enjoy sampling.

    Darrell.Owens@ybf-Skincare.com

  • September 18, 2011

    by Kevin

    You know I have not...I am basically looking for an eye cream that will hydrate, smooth resurface look while combating slight puffiness and slight darkness..I feel like I just dont know which one to choose. Im 26 and by no means loaded where I can shop around til I find the right one..I just wish I could get an honest answer and product that works.

  • September 16, 2011

    by Julie Kay

    Kevin- by asking about the three eye potions above, does this mean you've tried the Five Best? Just curious... ~jk

  • September 15, 2011

    by Kevin

    HI Marta,
    I am trying to choose between several products and I was wondering if you would be able to give your input on these products and which ones you would reccommend for me. I am trying to find an eye cream that will hydrate and smooth my eyes while making them less puffy and dark..I would say around this time of year my eyes begin to become really dry and a little puffy and Im just looking for the right eye cream that can overall provide what I am looking for since the ones I am going to mention are a little pricey..

    1) Elemis Pro-Collagen Eye Renewal

    2)La Thérapie Gel Intensif Yeux Intensive Eye Gel for tired Eyes

    3)Laboratoire Remède Hydra Therapy Eye Crème


    Any thoughts you have on these products I would really appreciate it..I just want to purchase a product that works..
    Thanks
    Kevin

  • August 3, 2011

    by Marta

    Hi Joan,

    You could start a discussion thread on our message boards http://truthinaging.com/message-boards

  • August 2, 2011

    by Joan

    Has anyone seen the advertisement with the woman who uses a combination of Allu wrinkle reducer and Auravie anti-aging cream/serum? Supposedly these two are an effecitve combo of Matrixyl 3000 and Co-enzyme Q10. Also - does anyone use Avon's Anew products?

  • July 25, 2011

    by diane

    Have you tried Hydroxatone? Hydroxatone advertises the ingredient of Matrixyl 3000 but you have not referred to it as far as I have seen. Would you share your thoughts about Hydroxatone? I use it and like it but am always keeping abreast of new products that contain vitamins and beneficial ingredients. Thank you!

  • April 25, 2011

    by Kevin

    Hi Marta, I dont know if I would say Im enjoying using it because I've just started to try it. Basically what has been going on is about a year or so ago I began to notice that my eyes were looking darker especially in certain lighting. I am a graduate school student who has long nights studying and writing papers etc. So I go to a doctor that is considered to be one of the best in Chicago-land (suburbs of Chicago Illinois) he recomends dermaware products. I try a dermaware product he recomends and I saw a little improvement. When I spoke with him last he said I should use this current product because the company does not offer the previous product. After purchasing it I noticed how many ingredients it contained, which prompted me to research them and I also found the debate with the ones you mentioned above. I just did not know how they would be approved by government standards, sold, and also recommended by a well respected cosmetic doctor. It's a little bit frustrating but I'm not going to keep using this product. Are their products that you would recommend that have track records of being successful, do not carry ingredients that are harmful. It would just be nice to use a product and not have to worry about it..I really appreciate your time and comments I just want to find something that will actually work. Thanks again Kevin

  • April 25, 2011

    by Dennis

    A little off topic, but not much. Last year I was sold Dermaware's extra strenth retinol cream, by an esthetician, to prepare my skin for a treatment (dermaroller). I liked it and so went to their website to look at other products. This is also around the time I really started to look at ingredients... the problem I have with Dermaware is that they attempt to paint themselves as a natural skin care company, but prefer to leave their potential customers in the dark by not listing ingredients on their site... not only that, but they seem to be embarrassed by what ingredients they do use, as I e-mailed and called several times inquiring about the ingredients in a few of their products and was either given the brush off (on the phone) or was not responded to at all (email). And by the ingredients Kevin listed above, I can see why. The main reason I admire Truth in Aging is the advocacy for consumers to be informed! I simply refuse to even consider a product by an internet retailer unless all ingredients are disclosed upfront on their site.

    /end rant

    Also, Marta, what are your feelings about Retinyl Palmitate in an eye cream?

  • April 25, 2011

    by Marta

    Hi Kevin, if you are enjoying using it, then that's great. But for more background on some ingredients have the potential to irritate. These include (click on links for more details) <a href="http://truthinaging.com/ingredient-spotlight/what-is-it-phenoxyethanol-and-is-it-safe" rel="nofollow">phenoxyethanol</a>, <a href="http://truthinaging.com/ingredients/diazolidinyl-urea" rel="nofollow">diazolidinyl urea</a>, <a href="http://truthinaging.com/ingredients/triethanolamine" rel="nofollow">TEA</a>, <a href="http://truthinaging.com/ingredients/propylene-glycol" rel="nofollow">propylene glycol,</a>. <a href="http://truthinaging.com/ingredient-spotlight/what-is-it-preservatives-and-parabens-and-are-they-safe" rel="nofollow">Parabens</a> are not so much irritants, but have been linked (although the association is controversial) to cancer. <a href="http://truthinaging.com/ingredients/propylene-glycol" rel="nofollow">Propylene glycol </a>should not be used on damaged/broken skin.

  • April 25, 2011

    by Kevin

    Hi Marta Thank you so much for your timely response and input on this product. I was wondering if you could maybe explain the negatives with silicones, parabens etc. I havent had irritation using this product unless a little bit gets in my eye which would is an obvious result. Thanks -Kevin

  • April 21, 2011

    by Marta

    Hi Kevin, I haven't tried this Dermaware eye cream, but it has definitely got some good things going for it. As far as dark circles are concerned, there is vitamin K, chrysin and hesperin methyl chalcone. The Matrixyl 3000 (Palmityl Oligopeptide, Palmityl Tetrapeptide-7) will help with wrinkles and may boost collagen and that could make dark circles less visible. Its also good to see copper and vitamin E. Having said that, this is not a product for those who want to avoid silicones, parabens and potentially irritating preservatives.

  • April 21, 2011

    by Kevin

    Hi Marta,
    What are your thoughts on this product to combat darkcircles also possibly reducing eye circle lines, kind of hard to explain but their on the side and in certein lighting makes it look like circles. this product claims to combat dark circles and crows feet so i thought it may also take away these lines.
    The product is DermAware's Circle out Eye Gel. the ingredients are Spring water, Phytonadione(Vit K), Glycerin, Palmityl Oligopeptide, Palmityl Tetrapeptide-7(Regenerating), Steareth-20, N-Hydroxysuccinimide, Chrysin(Enlightening Peptide), Butylene Glycol, Cucumis Sativus(Cucumber) Extract, Hesperin Methyl Chalcone, Dipeptide-2(Decongestant), Cyclomethicone, Dimethicone, Stearic Acid, Copper Gluconate, Sodium Hyaluronate, Tocopheryl Acetate(Vit E), Panthenol(Vit B) Retinyl Palmitate(Vit A), Vitis Vinifera(Grape)Seed extract, Chamomilla(Matricaria) Flower Extract, Squalene(Olive), Octyldocanol, Coco-Caprylate Caprate, Fragrance(Natural), Cetyl Alchol, Acrylates/C10-30 Alkyl Acrylate Cross-polymer, TEA-Carbomer, Polyglyceri-4 Isosterate, Cetly PEG/PPG-10/1 Dimethicone, Hexyl Laurate, Glyceryl Monostearate Proplene Glycol, Diazolidinyl Urea, Propylparaben, Methylparaben, Disodium EDTA. I have already bought this product I am just wondering if this product is ok etc.. any thoughts and advice I would really appreciate it. Thank you so much

  • March 21, 2011

    by Sunday

    Hello Trinity ~ Truth In Aging is where I learned about Cellbone products and I gotta tell you I ABSOLUTELY WILL NOT be without Super AOX Skin Firm Moisturizer...here is the link

    http://www.cellbone.com/AOX.htm

    It is currently $36.00 AND they give you 3 good sized samples of their other products, some of their samples sizes are what other company's sell as normal size ~ really!!! In my last order I got a collagen facial cleanser, a rice scrub and a Moist'Seal Antiaging Moisturizer Gel. I like the facial cleanser and rice scrub ~ I probably will never buy them on my own (I said I like them...NOW I only buy what I LOVE)~ but it helped stretch my budget so I could buy more of the AOX!!!! I KNOW Olay products can NEVER do for you what Super AOX Skin Firm Moisturizer WILL ~ just my opinion and welcome to TIA!

  • March 21, 2011

    by marta

    Hi Trinity, we are always on the lookout for wrinkle repair products that work and don't cost the earth. We can only be as good as the industry though. However, please check out our Five Best for under $100
    http://truthinaging.com/face/five-best-serums-for-under-100 . And Five Best for under $50 truthinaging.com/uncategorized/five-best-antiaging-serums-for-under-50

  • March 21, 2011

    by Trinity

    I feel really inadequate asking this.... but here goes. Where can i find a half way decent wrinkle repair cream that I can afford. When I say can afford..... I've been using Olay products and feel stretched to the limit. When I see product commercials on the tele I (now) immediately say to myself, (these companies are not interested in helping EVERYONE just wealthy people.) Please help me find something affordable for my skin. I need help with my eye area and lips. (Laugh lines are not that funny!!) ~Eternally grateful!
    Trinity

  • February 23, 2011

    by Designermommy

    This is some interesting stuff. I started researching eye creams and Matrixyl 3000 because I am 33 and the only place I am beginning to age is the fine lines around my eyes. I wanna nip this stuff in the bud!!! I have always had dark circles too, and never found a cream that helped.

    TIA is a great website! I'm learning a lot about products here and enjoying it. Thanks for keeping it "real". I'm still trying to figure out what cream to try. :)

  • May 26, 2010

    by Ellena

    Debbie,
    It is so great that you are writing and helping us with your extensive experience to better understand labels. I would really appreciate you write a full review re skin care products or ingredients (and %)to look for. This is mostly needed for a face cream that fights expression lines and a good and not harmful sunscreen (no major wrinkles other then expression ones due to my age of 33).

    Martha, what do you think of this? Maybe Debbie can be contacted and asked if she would be willing to help us a bit more. Thx.

  • May 18, 2010

    by Angela

    Hi Julie,

    Thanks for elaborating. I just went back to re-read the ingredients of the two Argireline-containing products that I've begun using and they each contain Matrixyl 3000 + loads of botanicals, which I hope will counteract whatever potential negative effect the Argireline might have on my skin.

    Now I just hope I don't give myself new wrinkles by squinting and furrowing my brow while scrutinizing my face for signs that the Argireline is behaving badly!

    Be well!

  • May 17, 2010

    by Curious

    Thanks alot Marta!

    Using it on neck lines now...seeing some results. Too early to say much. Simplicity seems the best for my age right now. Wouldn't want to load my skin with too much.

    There is really a wealth of info on your site. A million thanks!

  • May 16, 2010

    by Julie Kay

    Angela- My skincare regimen has been honed to what works best for my face. I'm amazed at the results I've achieved the past couple years- due, in fact, to knowledge gained right here at TIA, my own common sense, and experimentation. Before I found TIA (May,2010) I was using a product that included Argireline (although I didn't know the ingredient by name at the time and only just recently have zeroed in on this ingredient as an issue FOR ME). It is a well-know anti-ager tool. But as has been stated many times by many sources, its effects have a limited timespan. When I was using the product with it (over 2 years ago) regularly I remember having to or wanting to reapply it more often as the weeks and months passed. This is hindsight, you understand. But yes, to answer you (I hope) I've cut it (products w Argireline) out of my regimen and worked at rebuilding the superstructure where my problem areas need it most. I have experimented w other cosmetic actives, too many to list here, perhaps that is an article, eh? But I am cautious, because I also believe my skin at 59 is less forgiving than it was 5-10 years ago.

    One disclaimer: I have a sample tube of YBF's Control I carry in my purse. Occasionally, for some event (wedding, "special" dinner, etc) I will apply a dot, sesame size dot, to my left jaw wrinkle as I arrive. That amount of Argireline never had an effect.

    It wasn't until I introduced a daily serum with a hefty percentage of Acetyl Hexapeptide 8 that I became reacquainted w my laugh lines. HA! And I'm not laughing. ~jk

  • May 16, 2010

    by marta

    Hi Curious, NCN looks OK although there isn't much to it - its a fairly simple formulation of something Haloxyl. This is Matrixyl, Hydroxysuccinimide and Chrysin. Its usually used for dark under eye circles and appears in eye creams.

  • May 16, 2010

    by marta

    I too am intrigued by Julie's Argireline experience and will do some more research on this ingredient.

  • May 16, 2010

    by Curious

    Hi Marta,

    Thanks for your reply. Nope, I do not work for NCN. But was rather curious as to the credibility of its products, since I am unsure if their products has a good science to back it up. Was looking for reassurance back there.

    Wouldn't want some homebrewed potions!

  • May 15, 2010

    by Angela

    Hi Julie,

    I just received two products that contain Argireline and after reading your comments I'm concerned about their effects in the long-term, so I hope you'll help me with some clarification.

    Has your skin care regimen remained the same in the last couple years and the only change you've made is to eliminate Argireline? Or have you added products/modified your routine in any way since eliminating Argireline? Do you feel that the Argireline in some way inhibited the cellular restructuring effects of other products or have you only recently (post-Argireline) incorporated products that assist in cellular restructuring?

    Any additional information you can provided would be wonderful.

    Thanks for your help!

    Angela

  • May 14, 2010

    by Julie Kay

    I have a typo up there: The past year while easing off potions containing Argireline, I've noticed had a huge leap forward in cellular restructuring. My face looked younger than, say, two years ago. Until the past six weeks when I reintroduced Argireline- that's when I "contected the dots." And believe me, at 59, it's a serious matter and even *iffy* whether my face, those wrinkles are gonna play ball with me. We're in negotiations now. ~jk

  • May 14, 2010

    by Julie Kay

    Gonna throw my 2 cents in, although this topic is over a long period of time I just read through the comments. The thing that caught my eye right off was Debbie saying, "Argireline should only be applied as a spot treatment... These pepetides act only temporarily and have no effect on building the dermis." Of which I totally agree and have been walking around this topic for weeks. When I use a product with Argireline, I notice it working, of course. But when it stops, I also notice an increase of the negative effect it worked to eradicate (eg wrinkles). This impact has worsened in the past year as I've eased off products containing Argireline. I've recently reintroduced a potion with Argireline and my left marionette wrinkles are revisible in ways I'd done a good job of eliminating. Matrixyl 3000, on the other hand, is stellar, and I believe it works hard to rebuild cellular structure.

    Just saying... ~jk

  • May 14, 2010

    by marta

    "Curious" since you are anonymous, I wonder if you work for NCN. For everyone else's benefit, here is the ingredients list: De-Ionized Water, Aloe Leaf Gel, Vegetable Glycerine, Palmitoyl Tetrapeptide-7, Palmitoyl Oligopeptide, Cucumber Fruit Extract, Chrysin, Hydroxysuccinimide, Palmitoyl Tetrapeptide-3, Palmitoyl Pentapeptide-3, Steareth-20, Polysorbate- 20, Carbomer, Diazolidinyl Urea, EDTA.

  • May 14, 2010

    by Curious

    Hi Debbie and Marta,

    Hope perhaps you guys can shed some light on NCN's 20% Matrixyl 3000? Judging from Debbie's prev responses on lotioncrafter's prdts, I would hope to hear some views and information about NCN....

    Please help!

  • February 14, 2010

    by Judy

    Has anyone heard of Bellanue and Capuacu Vital?
    They're suppose to be the top of the line in anti-aging but are not listed in you picks.

  • November 25, 2009

    by Agi

    Is anyone familiar with a product readily available in Canada(Vancouver)that has Matrixyl
    3000 as it's main ingredient.....(possibly containing hyluronic acid and argireline) as well???

  • July 23, 2009

    by admin

    Darrylin - sorry for the tardy response. We updated the top five products with matrixyl 3000 in April 2009: http://www.truthinaging.com/uncategorized/five-best-serums-with-matrixyl-3000-updated-april-2009/

  • July 21, 2009

    by Darrylin

    I noticed on your website stating your findings regarding the top five products with Matrixyl 3000 was dated July '08. Do you have a more current list or does this one still stand?
    I'm finding it very helpful, but of course, am concerned about getting the most up to date information.
    Thank-you for your time.

  • June 25, 2009

    by marta

    I haven't tried Smooth-365, but I can tell you that palmitoyl oligopeptide is Matrixyl, not Matrixyl 3000. It isn't quite as potent as M3000, but still good. AH-8 is a neurpeptide that inhibits muscles from moving and creating expression lines.

  • June 25, 2009

    by Irene

    I have seen ads for "Smooth-365". It has Palmitoyl Oligopeptide and Acetyl Hexapeptide-8. Has anyone tried this product? If so, how did it work, and do these ingredients make up Matrixyl 3000?

  • June 5, 2009

    by Kate

    Collagen Lift is not on this list but it contains both Matrixyl 3000 and Argireline. I use it every day and its fantastic and my skin feels great.

  • May 10, 2009

    by Wok King

    Marta,
    Enjoyed Debbie (HTH) post (April 22) and tried searching for the first part of her post. Guess it's lost?

    Have a question: Several years ago, Consumers Report/Consumers Union collaborated with a sister French company to research/test various wrinkle creams that included usual drugstore brands as well as high end products including a French brand costing $335 and ounce.

    The 12 week test of women between 30 and 70 years resulted in Olay Regenerist (lotion, cream, and serum-each costing $19) ranked First along with Lancome costing $88 per oz.

    I checked with Olay to see if they've upgraded their formulation with Matrixyl 3000 and was told no, but she said they now use amino-peptides.

    Question: Are you familiar with the test? Good Housekeeping also conducted a test recently and ranked Olay top rank.

    The 25 ingredients for Olay's Regenerist Serum is listed in alphabetical order for ease of viewing (do you have any comments as to which ingredients appear to be so effective as to give Olay top ranking in the two research/tests described above?):

    Ingredients:

    Regenerist Daily Serum - Fragrance free:

    Allantoin
    Benzyl Acohol
    Bis-PEG/PPG-14/14 Dimethicone
    Butylene Glycol
    Camellia Sinensis Leaf Extract
    Cetyl Ricinleate
    Cyclopentasiloxane
    Dimethicone
    Dimethicone Crosspolymer
    Disodium EDTA
    Ethylparaben
    Glycerin
    Methylparaben
    Niacinamide
    Palmitoyl Pentapeptide-3
    Panthenol,
    Polymethylsilsesquioxane
    Propylene Glycol
    Propylparaben
    PEG-10 Dimethicone,
    PEG-100 Stearate,
    PEG-10 Dimethicone/Vinyl Dimethicone Crosspolymer
    Sodium Metabisulfite
    Tocopheryl Acetate
    Water

    I do not know which ingredient(s) are considered "amino peptides."

    Be well, be safe,

    Wok King

  • May 3, 2009

    by marta

    Tra, I feel your pain. I'm not sure why this post encouraged such a wide range of comments. The Dermaxime recommendation was specifically for someone who is in South Africa (it's a South African brand). Anyhow, you might want to read our recent update of Five Best with Matrixyl for the latest recommendations: http://www.truthinaging.com/2009/04/five-best-serums-with-matrixyl-3000-updated-april-2009.html

  • May 3, 2009

    by tra

    So we started out talking about Matrixyl 3000 and what is the answer/product? I have just spent hours reading and are you saying the answer is Dermaxime and does this even contain the magical Matrixyl 3000? Help!?!

  • April 23, 2009

    by marta

    Petalyn
    This is EASY! You have a fantastic local brand called Dermaxime. I've been using their products recently with great results. read the review here: http://www.truthinaging.com/2009/02/reviewed-and-recommended-dermaxime-rejuvenating-toner.html

  • April 23, 2009

    by Petalyn

    Hello there,

    I have read through all the comments and am more confused than ever.

    I am a 46 year old lady with very deep wrinkels (when I was younger they were called laugh lines .... now they are just huge crevaces!!)

    As I live in South Africa I have to usually convert the dollar price to SA Rand and the price ends up being quite hefty (the exchange rate hovers at R10.00 a dollar.
    I have tried Roc products, Estee Lauder, La Mar to name a few and quite frankly do not see any difference.

    Martha, you seem quite knowledgeable and I would appreciate your advice. I don't like complicated regimes and am the kind of women that washes her faces puts on cream and then off I go.

    What would you suggest I use.

    Many thanks

  • April 23, 2009

    by Debbie

    My post was cut off and posted on it's own..strange...

    Anyway....

    Argireline should only be applied as a spot treatment on the specific muscles that cause expression lines. The same is true for SNAP- 8 and SYN-AKE and all peptides of similar nature. These pepetides act only temporarily and have no effect on building the dermis. They have no role in the synthesis, organization or preservation of collagen. (I do consider use of more than 1-2 of these redundant.) These peptides should be in a single product category for treating expressionn lines and sold as an alternative (although obviously not as effective) as Botox injections.

    Other peptides do support various stages of the collagen life cycle. If a person truly understood the chemistry of peptides, they would never post in the manner that Romira/Albert did lumping Argireline together as similar in action to Matrixyl 3000 or Syn-COLL (the last two actually being more similar!).

    Later in the thread she/he seemed to retract his/her MAP, HA and Syn-COLL only formula to include other peptides she/he learned about along the way.

    Some of the statements are too wild to even touch..such as comparing a certain peptide to a vectored hydroxyproline? OMG!

    Just to clear up the Matrixyl 3000 argument. Sederma do NOT suggest only 3%, they suggest 3-8%, but that is only a recommendation and by no means suggests that a company testing it in their own formulation may not find improved results at 15%. While it is true that Sederma did not do trials on human skin with 15%, it is irresponsible to state that it could not be linear at higher levels. It is better to state that all we know is that it is linear to X%, but that higher additions could (or could not) prove more beneficial. Persoanlly, I would formulate at the upper end of the recommended usage level for all of my ingredients, so I would use 8% Matrixyl 3000.

    http://lotioncrafter.com/pdf/matrixyl3000.pdf

    I would advise staying away from anything she/he offers as it is obviously not formulated with a sound knowledge base of skin aging or peptide technology.

    BTW: Anyone can buy the ingredients from Pentapharm and Sederma! They are available on many DYI skincare ingredient websites, so that is not an insider secret!

    I do agree with almost everything you say about the industry in general Romira/Albert and at first thought we were long lost twins trying to expose the "truth" (expectations, price not being at all equal to value, formulations, useless long ingredient lists meant only to impress, etc.), which is why I was impresssed to stumble across a website called Truth-In-Aging!.

    But after reading all of your posts, I don't believe you worked as a formulation chemist for a cosmetics company at all. I think you are passionate about the injustice (as am I and I imagine the owners of this site are) and played around with a homebrew.

    Your final creation may actually be decent, but I cannot trust your product due to your demonstrated lack of knowledge in this thread...which I realize improved as you went along researching.

    I think using this site in order to market a product is in bad taste, unless there is a special area for posting your own homebrews that I have not come across yet.

    HTH

  • April 23, 2009

    by Debbie

    Oh my, this thread is quite hilarious really.

    I am a biochemist and advise on skin care formulations and help individuals chose wisely. I work for no skin care company and never have.

    It cracks me up that Romira/Albert used this forum to rope in people to support his/her potion when it is truly obvious that she/he knows little more than those she/he insults.

    I totally agree 100% about all of the false claims and garbage products on the market and I was totally with you (Romira/Albert) until you started talking about the actual chemistry. Then I knew you were just stabbing in the dark.

    There is no such thing as a 30% solution of HA. It becomes a solid at that percentage!

    All of the peptide ingredients you mentioned do not do the same thing and unfortunately, you did not mention many of the good ones that compliment the Syn-COLL you chose.

    It is especially distressing when anyone on this website groups "peptides" into one category.

    In fact, even though it is standard industry practice now (because it sells), the peptides that act like Botox (they work on the muscles or nerves to "freeze" facial expression lines) should NEVER be smeared all over the facial skin. It is dangerous long term. When these peptides (argireline being the firt and still most well known)

  • April 14, 2009

    by Ken Simpson

    Skin 2 Skin's Anti-Sagging Renewal Serum is 17% Matrixyl 3000, Maximum recommended concentration, Vitamin E and cosmetic silicons (non-toxic) as the spreading agent that also sofens and hydrates the skin.

    We use no water in our Anti-Sagging Renewal Serum, to diluting the the product and because we use no water that causes bacteria to grow we do not have to use any preservatives and it is unscented.

    If you want a product that delivers and gets fast results Skin 2 Skin Care's Anti-Sagging Renewal Serum is the one to use.

    Matrixyl - Patmitoyl Tetrapeptide-3 - 17%
    Ingredients:
    Cyclopentasiloxane, Dimethicone, Dimethicone/Vinyl Dimethicone Crosspolymer, Palmitoyl Tetrapeptide-3, Tocopheryl Acetate (Vitamin E).

  • April 14, 2009

    by marta

    Wok King
    You can click on this link to join: https://app.e2ma.net/app2/survey/26729/6944/6ad2e2b2ea/

  • April 14, 2009

    by Wok King

    Marta,
    Hi, read your offer to join the TIA VIP club, but did not find any instructions on how to apply. I must have missed something, but can you clairfy the process for applying?

    Be healthy, age gracefully,
    Wok King

  • April 9, 2009

    by Shancy

    Now I have a question regarding lip plumpers I looked on the site, but didn't find a lot of info on them however I haven't read every review yet. Does anyone have some results they are happy with?

  • April 9, 2009

    by Shancy

    Thank You Marta for saving me some money. I had a hard time finding an ingredient list, but now I know and will give Lorac a try.

  • April 8, 2009

    by Wok King

    Marta,
    Thank you for the lipstick info.

    Follow-up: Have you or any of your associates come up with any other hair conditioner nominees.

    Wok King

  • April 8, 2009

    by marta

    Wok King, re lipstick:

    I went to the best source for this one. My friend Emily always has amazing, long-lasting red lips. Last time she visited, her lipstick-stained coffee cup took two goes in the dish washer. That's a lipstick with staying power. Her answer: Channel.

  • April 8, 2009

    by marta

    Hi Shancy,
    I haven't used this, so it is a prejudice from a distance. But whenever I look at Laboratoire Remede's products, I can't work up a strong interested. There is nothing in this foundation that makes me sit up and take notice:
    Cyclopentasiloxane, water (aqua), phenyl trimethicone, c12-c15 alkyl benzoate, ethylene/acrylic acid copolymer, butylene glycol, polymethyl methacrylate, laurylmethicone copplyol, disteardimonium hectorite, tocopheryl acetate, phenoxyethanol, sodium myristoyl glutamate, tetrasodium edta, propylene carbonate, fragrance (parfum), methylparaben, aluminum hydroxide, ethylparaben, butylparaben, propylparaben, isobutylparaben, mica, titanium dioxide (ci77891).

    It has run of the mill chemicals and a bit of vitamin E. Not even anything interesting the light deflecting department.

    I'd keep looking if I were you. In a similar price range (actually a bit cheaper) you could look at Lorac. We reviewed it here:
    http://www.truthinaging.com/2008/09/reviewed-and-recommended-lorac-natural-performance-foundation.html

  • April 8, 2009

    by Shancy

    Marta or anyone else,

    Have you had any experience with Laboratoire Remede Soft Focusing Lotion? It looks like a nice light coverage type foundation, however also seems pricey.

  • April 6, 2009

    by Wok King

    Marta,
    Looked at the reviews on lipstick, but would appreciate info I can pass on to my wife; firstly, what ingredients are essential in the formulation of lipstick that supports good coloring and excellent ability to adhere to the lips once applied? Secondly, are there any ingredient(s) that are no-no?

    And lastly, any Lipstick brands that stand out?

    Be healthy, age gracefully,

    Wok King

  • April 6, 2009

    by marta

    Hello everyone,

    I have, sadly, had to delete Albert's last comment. Here at TIA, we like a bit of controversy, but his remarks were getting personal and inappropriate.

    Thanks to you all for your patience and good natures.

    Marta

  • April 5, 2009

    by Leslie McPhatt

    Albert...ENOUGH ALREADY! Gee whiz. Why do you have to have the last word? Why are you so sensitive to these harmless remarks? Let it go, man. Let it go! This is not the proper forum. Start your own blog if that is what you want to do but let's let truth in aging get back to doing what it does best. Please, for the love of God, give it a rest, dude!

  • April 5, 2009

    by Kathryn Daffryn

    Albert, I am not offended, just bored with this and somewhat irritated at how you talk to people here. Nobody can say anything to you Albert that you disagree with without receiving a condescending and lengthy monologue in return.

    And free speech aside, this isn't a forum for discussion actually, Albert. This portion of the page appears to be the comments section of a story. If you scroll way back up there to the top of this very long web page. You'll see there's a link to the actual site forums. Maybe you can get someone here to create a special Albert forum there for you and then anyone who wants to read and engage with you, get your pricing structure, will have a place to go?

    I'm not sure even if it's a place to be talking about your new products since that would constitute you as a marketer using the comments section to self-promote your own goods. Good to see you're planning another post here to list your pricing structure? Can other companies use the comments section here to pitch their goods?

    And really? You are starting a business and these posts you've made are how you want customers to see you? At this point Albert, you could bottle the actual fountain of youth, slap a sale sticker on it and wrap it in a bow. I wouldn't give you my business simply based on my observations of how you conduct yourself on this page. Since you want your new business to succeed, you might like to know that you actually come off as rude, a little pompous and somewhat neurotic.

  • April 5, 2009

    by Albert

    Sorry I neglected to mention the moisturizer price as being $45.00 to $55.00 range for the 60 ml (2 oz.) actuall fill 66 ml (2.3 oz.) size.

  • April 4, 2009

    by Albert

    PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE (not yelling... just emphasizing) do not take this as anything other than information and NOT a sales pitch.

    I am getting into this NOT to become rich, assuming I will even sell one bottle since I have NO clue as how to market it, but as a personal reaction on my part to what I have since seen on the internet about anti-aging products, their ingredient listings and their pricing and marketing techniques.

    Whether I am successful or not in offering a viable way of doing business and the high standards I will set for my products is totally out of my hands and in the hands of the consumers who will place their "vote" on what I have formulated.

    I can however, without pretention and without taking a back seat to anyone else and the entire cornocopia of Peptides out there, state emphatically that, in MY opinion, I will be offering the very best that money can buy regardless of country of origin or manufacturer's name. Of that I have absolutely NO doubt!

    The above sounds like a sales pitch and I apologise for that even though I have no way of knowing how else to state the case.

    I am NOT, I repeat, I am not running down any other company or product. My issue has always been with their % claims and the prices they ask, and that, honestly, is the reason I am getting into this and which in fact prompted me to react as I have.

    My serum and moisturizing complex will be packaged in a simple PET boston round frosted amber or dark blue bottle with an elegant treatment pump that has either a silver or a gold neck band and a white trigger on top. The simple graphics and the poroduct name, which I have registered already, will be in gold/silver screening on the bottle, depending on the colour chosen..... think of the Este Lauder Night repair bottle as an example.

    The Serum and moisturizing complex will be offered as 60 ml (2 oz.) .... actual fill for both will be 66 ml (2.3 oz.). That is at least double the quantity offered by the overwhelming majority of serums for sale which are invariably offered at 30 ml (1 oz.)

    Its also VERY important to note that I have formulated the serum as a tripple product that is at once an anti-wrinkle serum: a Firming serum, and an effective eye serum. It is NOT a moisturizer as such even though some of the actives give moisturizing benefits. However, it does save a lot of money on purchasing different specific items when its all in one.

    Taking all the above into consideration:

    I will be asking a reasonable price of between $65.00 and $75.00 per 60 ml unit, keeping in mind its double the quantity of almost 95% of what is being offered, as well as being the very best, NOT to mention the fact that its a THREE-IN-ONE product.

    I will also offer a one-time 20% discount on the very first order.
    Each and everytime anyone purchases the serum at full price, they will also receive a FREE full size Moisturizing complex with it. This is NOT just a one-time offer. Its each and every time they purchase the serum the moisturizer will be shipped with it, FREE!

    When they purchase the very effective Moisturizer by itself, 60 ml (2 oz.) full size, they also get the 20% one-time discount.

    Also, when they purchase the moisturizer by itself, they get their choice of a FREE 120 ml (4 oz.) cream cleanser, or a 210 ml (7.4 oz.) foaming cleanser. Each of those products are top quality and the cream cleanser is nothing but pure JoJoba , Hemp seed, squalane, rice bran and evening primrose oils at NO less than 3% per wt for each in the formulation, which is at least 300% more than most will spend to put into their formulations, even IF they use those precious natural organic oils. Included are other skin benefitting ingredients incorporated into it as well.

    ALL shipments in North America will be FREE!

    Shipments to anywhere else in the world will be STRICTLY what the postage is on the package and no more!..... obviously they also get the discounts and the free products as well.

    Furthermore, the product will be guaranteed and the guarantee will read as follows: If after using our products twice a day for 45 days and for whatever reason you are not satisfied with the results, then contact customer service by email and aquire a return authorization # and then return the product to us for a FULL refund, NO questions asked..... well maybe just one question and that is if you tell us why you did not like the products so that we can improve on them in the future.

    Other than giving the product away for FREE, I have no idea what else to do to make my promise of being reasonable a reality.

    I will try/have tried to make this an honest exchange between myself and the consumer by offering the very best for a most reasonable price.

    The web site will ready soon and the ingredients will be listed on there and each one will get a full explanation of what it is. I will also have a section of Q & A where I will try and explain anticipated consumer questions.

    I guarantee you and promise that ALL the ingredients I uae will be nothing but the best from the best suppliers and at the optimal level to benifit you. I will NOT and have NOT cut down on the percentages of any of the ingredients in order to include it in the ingredient listing and make the products sound better. You get the FULL benefit of each ingredient at its optimal level and NOT a hyped up level. That is a guarantee and a promise.

    Let me know what you think of the pricing.

    (suggestion... I wish we had spell check on here. :)) )

  • April 4, 2009

    by Albert

    KimbaWLion

    That was a well reasoned and lucid post, although there is so much on the subject of supplements that I would find it difficult to enter into a discussion on it in generalities.

    I also agree with your comments about "pricing" of certain products. In fact, I am stunned by a Toronto company that sells their products under the label of Celex-C who recently introduced a product by the name of AGE-LESS 15 and retail the 4 oz. (120 ml) size at $525.00 US dollars and $175.00 US Dollars for their 1 oz. (30 ml) size.

    Other than a marketing technique for continuing to attach "value" to the Celex-C brand (and they DO put out excellent products) I cannot see any justification for asking that amount, especially when I read their ingredient listing that at most, would add up to a minimum of a 22,000 % mark-up.

    They use nothing but the best ingredients and I "love" the fact they they formulate with simplicity and effectiveness without falling prey to the trend we now see where so many extraneous ingredients need to be added to make the product viable. Yet, the price, which is their right to set, is outrageous.

    The dilema is that I could duplicate their formula right down to the Nth degreee and say, for the sake of argument, retail it for $45.00 Dollars. Who will buy it of those who are customers of Celex-C and who, I will guarantee, will think that mine is nothing but a cheap immitation and noy anywhere close to the "real" product.

    That, for me is the dilema!

    In my own formulation, which I changed yet again as I struggle with all of this, I have attempted to incorporate ingredients that help in moisturization, firming and anti-aging without duplicating the effects.

    To that end, I have decided to cut out all the peptides as being redundent and have incorporated only ONE peptide, Syn-Coll, which I feel does the job admirably.

    Yes, I have taken out Matrixyl 3000, Argireline, Syn-Ake, Biopeptide-CL and a host of other Peptides.... ALL of them wonderful and powerful actives and yet, for me, all of them to a large extent merely duplicate one another and NOT cumulative in their effect, otherwise if you added cumulatively all the % of wrinkle reductions each one gives you, one would end up with the skin of a new-born baby.

    I have chosen ingredients that I think are effective and yet address the problems from different approaches, even though for myself I would like to have a serum with only THREE actives in it, but, for marketing purposes, would be a disaster. So, to be honest to myself, I have chosen active ingredients that are dissimilar in how they address the age-old question and quest for the "fountain of youth".

    I use one stem cell ectract technology ingredient. Another that stimulates our stem cells and gives them longevity. Others that work on the "time" relevant issue of apoptosis (cell death). Another that moisturizes and lightens the skin and age spots. Another that works on reducing puffiness and dark circles under the eyes and so forth.

    Yet, as I have always stated and will state again to the detriment of boring everyone, that this is still a skin care item and NOT a visit to the plastic surgean. NORE can you or should you expect the same results. One can only accomplish so much with a serum or a cream. IF you accept that and NOT look for promissed "youth in a bottle" but visible improvement, then you will be happy with the results.

    my pricing structure will be more than reasonable and based on my ability to give value for the hard-earned money of those who wish to try it.

    I will list my pricing structure (the asking price will still be a close estimate) in another posting to follow this one.........

  • April 4, 2009

    by Albert

    Kathryn Daffryn

    I will NOT contribute to your fanning of any "mud slinging" on here since there was none to start with.

    Anonymous and I had an honest discussion about percentages and I, for my part, explained what I meant.

    I thought Anomymous was a gentleman/Lady in how he/she handled it and I would hope that I was equally polite on my end.

    In any case, this is a forum for discussion and for disagreements at times. There is no merit in trying to run anyone down for voicing an honest opinion and having someone else disagree with that opinion and counter it with their own. This is what makes a discussion.

    I have always appreciated other peoples opinions about things and enjoyed engaging them in discussions where idears are voiced and opinions are proferred. I am also too far away from the modern trend for a large percentage of the population that seems to be "waiting" to be offended by anything. I am not quite sure I understand that and quite frankly have no desire to.

    Kathryn Daffryn, I am sorry if I caused you distress because you became "offended" at our discussion even though I am not quite sure what it is that offended you, or, frankly what it was that you were getting at by finding a discussion about percentages so utterly annoying and a "drama"

    I would not do anything to harm this web site and if I felt that I was, I think I would leave here.

    Other than the above, I truly have nothing to say to you except maybe for you to stop being so easilly "offended" with freedom of speech and topic.

  • April 4, 2009

    by Albert

    Justine,

    I am not disappointed. Its still nice to meet you.

  • April 4, 2009

    by Kathryn Daffryn

    I also find this whole discussion interesting, but I think the mud slinging over who is right about using less or more ingredients than what's suggested is off-topic drama. I'm sure both sides could debate this until the cows come home, but I don't come to truth in aging to read a bunch or rants I can find anywhere else on the web. And so I hate that I'm even speaking up with what I'm about to say because I feel like I'm just fanning the fires. But, I understand where Albert and anonymous are coming from, but I don't think anonymous was wrong. When Albert said one bottle that was 25% argaline has 25 grams of argaline, I thought that was weird too but didn't give it more thought until I saw the reply from anonymous, which made sense to me if you think like a consumer and not a chemist.

    It looks like the confusion between Albert and anonymous comes from use of the word 'bottle' and Albert's point of a 25% argaline product costing at least $10.00 per bottle. When I hear 'per bottle' I think of the bottle I buy at Sephora, which to anonymous' point is usually one ounce and I guess around 30 grams, not a chemists' bottle of 100 grams of product that Albert was talking about. When Albert was making a point that manufacturers who state a high amounts of ingredients in their products must be lying, I understood what he meant. But in his example he made it sound like the one ounce bottle I buy at Sephora with 25% argaline costs $10.00 just for the argaline and I think that's what anonymous was just trying to clear up.

    I also don't think anonymous was speaking out of support for the camp that more is ALWAYS better, but saying that SOMETIMES more is better. Personally though, I tend to seek out concentrated products because I can put less product on my face at a time and I get better results.

  • April 4, 2009

    by Justine

    Hi, Albert,

    I am not Anonymous. I have only ever posted comments on this website under my real name. Sorry to disappoint!

  • April 4, 2009

    by KimbaWLion

    Hello peoples,
    Lots of interesting reading here lately. Being a heavy supplement taker and doing tons of research like any good engineer, since I am one, I had looked into the greying of hair a little while ago. There are various supplements thats that seem to help. I am soon to be 47 and show just a trace of grey in my strawberry blond hair. What I have read is a good dosage of niacin and some of the amino acid supplements as well as some chinese herbs, He Shou Wu being just one, that are actually documented to slow and sometimes reverse some of the greying over a 3-5 month period,there is nothing that works 100% that I know about out there.There is suppose to be a drug that Loreal was suppose to market about 2 years ago and I have not heard hide nor hair of since it was applied to at the FDA. Here is about the only informational link I could find http://digg.com/d11FUj no idea whether true or not . Do some googling and you can find the supplements and see what you wish to believe in. Swanson vitamins has just about everything there for you to chose from after you see what think may work best for you.

    I always do enjoy reading Albert's posts. I really understood the 100% w/w since it was well explained to me before, so I was really confused when somebody disputed the accuracy, glad that was all cleared up.
    I also agree from real world experience that when a manufacturer recommends specific %s for best use its that way for a reason! More does not often mean better and in MORE than enough cases can cause real harm. Anybody that does not realize that is playing with fire. I leave formulations to the chemists. I would not want a chemist designing and building roads and bridges like I do, nor would a chemist want to try a face serum that an engineer mixed up on %s that he thought were right. Some products do work better than others and price is CERTAINLY not an indicator!! A lot of big names get away with charging BIG bucks for products that are marked up 100s of % and when you read lables OR can manage to get a list of ingrediants often they are similar and in no way justify that 100s or more that they charge. My case in point in when I went into see the dermatologist. She sells stuff for bargin prices of $250 and higher. Who says her products are any better than the Nutralift or anything else that costs a lot less. I will have some empty bottle soon and afte coming here at least I can make informed choices. I will say this when Albert brings out his 2 products I will look at them know what's in them see the price and make a decision based on that and works fine for me. More expensive does NOT mean better and I believe most people here at least think this way.

  • April 3, 2009

    by Wok King

    Marta,
    Kronos is more than what I need for a hair conditioner.

    I'll wait for the results you come up with after you have time to do a little more research.

    Hopefully, "hair conditioners" will get more attention and catch up with their shampoo and hair coloring counterparts.

    Be healthy, age gracefully,

    Wok King

  • April 3, 2009

    by marta

    Wok King,

    In the meantime, check this one out: http://www.truthinaging.com/2008/11/reviewed-and-recommended-kronos-phyx-overnight-repair-masque.html

  • April 3, 2009

    by marta

    Wok King,
    I'm still looking for the Holy Grail of good conditioners. However, there are a few I can pull together. Check back in later next week.

  • April 3, 2009

    by Wok King

    Marta,
    The more I surf your website, the more comprehensive I find its coverage; and just think, it was by happenstance that I discovered your site!

    I surfed your hair care products section looking for the best available hair conditioners (versus shampoos) and didn't find any products. After reading articles about why our hair turns gray, I came away with the notion that good conditioners is a key to keeping hair healthy. Any comments -did I overlook something?

    Be healthy,

    Wok King

  • April 3, 2009

    by Albert

    Another thing that I am struggling with for my own sake, since I will be bringing out my own Serum, ( I am NOT running any other company down) is the pricing structure that permiates the majority of serums/lotions/creams in terms of the very high Retail structure that most use.

    I am vehemently opposed to any "price controls" on anyone and strongly believe in a companies freedom to charge what it wants to and that in the final analysis, its the consumer as the end user who will determine if that price is something they are willing to pay.

    We, as a society, regardless of where we are, have evolved into thinking that the more something costs, the better it is. That you get what you pay for. That if one sees a product with magnificent and effective ingredients listed in their ingredient list and selling for less than half what other higher priced products in that catagory are selling for, that the lower priced product is not as good.

    In some cases that is true. Yet when I compare the exhorbitant retail prices (its their right to charge what they want) to what I calculate their costs to be from their ingredient listings, the spread is shocking to say the least and I feel badly for those struggling financially in times like these and "having" to pay those prices with their hard earned money.

    Please let me know what your thoughts are when/if you see a product with an amazing array of ingredients similar to those in a more expensive product (even though it would mostly be over-kill and not needed) priced at a much lower level that the overwhelming majority of similar products. Would you think that the lower priced Serum is less effective or not as good? Would you also struggle with attempting to decide where you want to spend your hard earned money but still feel that you are getting a better product if you bite the bullet and buy the more expensive serum?

    I would love to hear your opinions and feelings on this matter of "perception"

    How would you feel about knowing how inexpensive 95% of those serums are in relationship to their asking retail prices? Would you feel cheated, used and abused?

    How would you feel by knowing that my example that I mentionrd in my previous post of using MAP (at the higher level of 15% wt), L-hydroxyproline and LMW (low molecular weight) hyaluronic acid that will, with scientific data to back it up, reduce (over a period of 6-8 weeks using it twice a day) fine lines and wrinkles by up to 58% amongst many other benefits, does NOT cost more than a fraction of the retail price companies are now charging to produce a 30 ml bottle, excluding the cost of the packaging and company overheads?

    How would you feel about paying $85.00 for this 30 ml bottle knowing these facts?

    Let me know please about how you feel when confronted with a lower priced product similar to the higher priced and better known product. Do you still sujectively think the higher priced product has got to be better?

  • April 3, 2009

    by Albert

    Justine

    Are you anonymous? I assumed as much from your response that you might be. If so, its nice to meet you. :)

  • April 2, 2009

    by Justine

    Read with interest the response from Albert. Apologies for not realizing you were talking about 100%wt calculations. I'm not in the cosmetics business and I am not a chemist, so unless I am hit over the head with an explanation, I am easily confused. Now I know what you are talking about and it is a very useful thing to have learned. Thanks!

  • April 2, 2009

    by Albert

    Anonymous.

    I just noticed your other post which also alludes to how manufacturers of active ingredients think when you say:

    "On some active ingredients, manufacturers will tell a potion maker, “the benefits will continue to increase with a rise in percentage use, but our data cuts off at 7%, so beyond that, you’re on your own.” A statement like that from the manufacturer doesn’t mean that the product will be no more effective at 9% versus 7%, but just that they didn’t see a need to incur testing costs at 8%, 9%, 10% and so on."

    A "potion maker"? oh my. LOL

    Well my noble marketing person (although I suspect you are with some cosmetic company from the vehemence that you present your case) you are now wrong three for three.

    In all my years of dealing with active ingredient developers I have NEVER ever came across anyone that said that 7% is the cheap way of doing it, however more is also good. They simply will NOT ever do that from an efficacy point of view not to mention the legal complications if someone uses it at higher percentages when the company itself cannot validate that use and they are on the hook for recommending its use at a higher percentage.

    I am NOT sure how you are transcribing your thought patterns on this issue. However, you are once again WRONG!

    Please provide us with any written documentation that proves your point about manufacturers claiming a % usage of their actives as being sufficient for optimal results and that in fact they also state that one can get better results using more of their active.

    I will say as clearly as I can and hope you will understand its simplicity: When an active is developed its tested on various ranges and is challenged by various pathogens for irritation or subcutaneous damage or long-term damage in miriade tests (tests for matrixyl for example cover some 90 pages in a bound volume given to manufacturers to validate the safety of their active and are VERY extensive in their scope). They determine the best percentage of that ingredient in terms of delivering the results that they claim that it does deliver. They then give the end user a guideline of a range that can be used...... from 2% to 8% per wt, for example. They NEVER ever claim and will NEVER claim that more is better since they have no scientific proof for that and those companies do not operate on anecdotal assumptions.

    Matrixyl 3000's optimal usage, for example, is at 3% wt (regular matrixyl is from 2% to 8% wt).. Sederma will NEVER ever state that more than 3% is better if they have absolutely NO proof of that, and if they did, then they would state it. If they stated that in any publication and they have NO scientific data to back that up and someone sues them on the basis of that claim they made, if something goes wrong, they are in big trouble.

    They, unlike those in the retail end who play the percentage game of more is better, will never stoop to that depth and destroy their reputation on the platter of expediency and the accumulation of more money through more sales.

    If, God forbid, you have high blood pressure and your systolic is at 175 and needs to be lowered by taking a certain drug or combination of drugs, will you then decide to take 80mg of Inderal, for example, overriding the doctors prescription and that of the drug manufacturer because YOU thought more is better? I doubt you would be foolish enough to take that chance.

    Equally NO manufacturer with give ANY other recomendation for the use of their product at anything higher than what they determined was the effective range through their testing procedures.

    Forgive me if I sound rude. However, I wish you would think before you speak and I wish you would consider researching the literature before you make such statements for the sake of making your totally invalid point/s that will do nothing but confuse some people, or worse yet, make them fall prey to the notion of the "auction" in cosmetic formulations where each company bids higher percentages attempting to make their products appear better than their competions.

    It is in the manufacturers best interest of increasing their bottom line to be able to claim 25% as being better than their recommended 10% (or whatever other percentage we are talking about) that is backed by scientific in-vivo and in-vitro testing. They CANNOT and will not do so because they cannot back that up with any validated data.

    Please provide us with ANY such written recommendations by any active ingredient manufacturer so I can then get down on my knees and humbly apologise to you, as well as making sure for my part, never to use any of that companies ingredients.

    You simply CANNOT do that because NO such written instructions/recommendations exist and no self-respecting scientist would ever allow their name to be associated with this form of "snake-oil" selling of ingredients that are conducted with a wink and a nod.

    Again forgive me, but you are getting somewhat tiresome with your "protestations" that have no basis other than what you think is "logical" for how you are thinking of the problem when in fact you are way off base on all of it.

    Whom do you really work for anonymous that you are defending the use of such charletan higher percentages when there is NO basis for them besides deluding the trusting consumers into thinking that more is better?

    I am grateful for Truth In Aging that allows us to uncover such dishonesty and obfuscation and I also apologise for being argumentative although being left no other choice bt the assertions made by anonymous.

  • April 2, 2009

    by Albert

    Anonymous , I wish you would get a name other than anonymous..

    As for my calculations I am not mixing up anything at all. Each and every formulation is calculated on a 100 % wt (weight). So if something has 25% in the formulation, it has 25 grams and then one has 75 g left in the formulation for other ingredients. Cosmetic chemists always formulate on a 100% wt basis. After that they can make whatever size batch they want to from a 20g sample lab batch to 1000 kg production batch. Its just a question of apportioning the % per wt after the formulation is done on the 100% wt basis.

    Please learn how to formulate, or otherwise stick with your apparent professional work which is presumably marketing, assuming you are the marketing person who posted before about my attacking other companies and their products when in fact I never did. You got that one wrong and now you got this one wrong. I am sure that you will try for a third "wrong" soon.

    If its a 30 ml bottle as you claim, then the 25% wt is no longer 25g and the Argireline translates into 7.5 g on that basis in that size bottle. I was calculating the way I should and that is by the 100 % wt. If one calculates at 100 % wt, which is the way to do it, then its 25g. End of discussion as far as I am concerned anonymous.

    Besides, my point was more about the use of Argireline @ 25% in the formulation when Lipotec in some 38 pages of clinical testing and other data in the developement of Argireline state that 10% is the maximum and in fact their most effective experiment was at 5% wt coupled synergistically with another peptide at 5% wt. The combination of both (each at 5% wt) gave better results than Argireline by itself at 10% wt..

    Therefore to claim 25% is ludicrous and is a waste of money for such an expensice active ingredient seeing how the high % is there simply to "market" the product, in MY opinion, dishonestly by making those claims and deluding unsuspecting consumers into thinking their product is better than one that has less Arhireline. My point was also that its cost at 25%does not translate well to the retail asking price. Ergo, the 25% is false when one also takes into acount all the other ingredients and their respective costs in the formulation, unless they are then divided by the remaining 75% (assuming some average use of 30 ingredients other than Argireline and some have up to 50) that would translate into 2.5% or less (2.5 g per 100 wt)per ingredient without taking into account the water phase.

    Surely that 2.5 % for each of the other remaining ingredients QS to 100.0 is not sufficient to do much of anything besides make the ingredient listing look impressive with as many ingredients as they can jam in there and to hell with honesty.

    For myself, the best anti-wrinkle serum would have MAP (magnesium ascorbyl phosphate) @ anywhere from 5 to 15% wt, L-hydroxyproline and Low molecular weight (NOT the regular HA used by 99% of companies that is about 800,000 to 2.5 million MW and therfore cannot penetrate the skin barrier) hyaluronic acid, but rather the one that is about 8,000 to 50,000 MW and can penetrate the epidermis and carry with it the other ingredients to where they can do some good. A good peptide-like Sepilift, or even Argireline ( I prefer Syn-Colle) which is a vectored hydroxyproline is ideal. That is all one needs frankly. But then NO one will buy that product simply because they want to see 'dozens" of peptides listed assuming that makes it better. It does NOT since the peptides are NOT cumulative. Its like going from NY to Florida and dragging 7 cars (each car representing a diffirent peptide) behind you when all you needed was the one car you are actually driving in. the other 7 are redundant. But the public "demands" volume of ingredients thinking it makes the product better, or, they think the more % used the better it is. In a few cases that is true. In most cases its NOT and its like an auction trying to outbid the competition with how much % they have in their product.

    Most will reject that way of thinking because they have been conditioned to think quantity of actives and not in terms of a single active that will actually do the job. Therefore, a three ingredient serum will simply stay on the shelf untouched while the "circus" of ingredients are flying off the shelves and the one staying untouched is in fact the better product, or as good as the best out there. Oh well.

    However I do appreciate your math seminar even though its not what I was referring to or that I will calculate things your way.

    Also, I will NOT get involved in any lengthy dissertation of thrust and perry on how one calculates percentages since I am satisfied with the scientific way I and thousands of cosmetic chemists, medical researchers and anyone formulating anything actually calculates things out of a 100% wt.

    In any case, good luck in your "marketing".

  • March 31, 2009

    by Wok King

    Marta,
    Sorry, I listed the wrong URL for research on gray hair; it should be:

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090223131123.htm

    Wok King

  • March 31, 2009

    by Wok King

    Marta,
    Many of your anti-aging readers have probably heard the hype about Tyroinase. No, it has nothing to do about ancient dinosaurs such as Tyrannosaurus, but it has all to do about the key enzyme (tyrosinase) that determines whether or not aging folks as myself get "gray" hair. Yes, aging gracefully is helped by treating our body's largest organ (our skin) with tender loving care, but hordes of us have difficulty looking and feeling young when our hair turns gray, then white and we spend much time and money with hair products to turn our hair back to some color other than gray/white. Recently, researchers have discovered that our hair turns gray due to a build up of hydrogen peroxide. For a discussion of this find, visit web site: http://www.fasebj.org/cgi/content/abstract/fj.08-125435v1

    Be young, inside and out,

    Wok King

  • March 31, 2009

    by LeeD

    Linny-
    So far so good with Youth Revive. I like it much better than Nutra Lift. My skin looks and feels better, it has a healthy glow. I also found that you don't need to use as much as the directions say. One pump goes a long way. I didn't order the eye cream, I was waiting to see how I liked the lift serum first. After seeing how well that has worked for me I am definately going to order the eye cream.
    I would recommend trying Youth Revive.
    I have yet to use the mask, only because of time. You need to leave it on for about an hour while lying down and I just had not been able to fit that in to my schedule yet. But I will be trying it this week and I'll let you know how that goes.

  • March 30, 2009

    by Justine

    I'm so glad someone else pointed out the erroneous calculations. Couldn't help but notice that myself.

  • March 30, 2009

    by Anonymous

    Also Albert, just to clear up some of your math, which is not making an apples-to-apples comparison, you write,

    “Argireline is selling at something like $400.00/kg (2.2 lbs) divide $400.00 by 1,000 (that is a kg) and you come up with a figure of .40 cents/g. now if you claim that you have 25% Argireline in your formulation, then multiply .40 cents x 25 (that is the % in the formulation) and you get a cost of $10.00/ bottle just for the one ingredient.”

    You are interchanging the meaning of grams and percentages in your statement. In other words, your math indicates the bottle with a $10 argireline cost contains 100 grams of product (more than three ounces) and 25 grams of argireline.

    I'm looking at a couple of products with Argireline right now...most are one ouce bottles (32 actual grams of product, less packaging), which at a 25% argireline concentration, means these formulas contain approximately 8 grams of argireline, not the 25 you indicated in your example.

    So...at the argireline costs you specified, the resulting cost per bottle is not $10 you stated, but $3.20 ... quite a difference.

  • March 30, 2009

    by Anonymous

    Romira/Albert,

    Your frustration with the beauty industry oftentimes making false claims is a common one. As a long-time reader of Truth In Aging, I think the site does a better job than most at filtering through bunk to find and recommend really good products.

    Some products Truth In Aging suggests are made by companies who quite often exceed active ingredient percentages given by the ingredient's manufacturer and these potion makers do so for the sake of product effectiveness, not marketing fodder.

    To make blanket statements like you do in your posts, that no active ingredient will be more effective when used at higher percentages than what is suggested by the manufacturer is irresponsible of you...and probably offensive to some potion makers whose interest is effectiveness.

    The decision to formulate at higher than recommended percentages cannot be made universally with all ingredients - common sense rules. Some ingredients should not be used at higher percentages, true. Some ingredients are exponentially more effective at higher percentages, true. Some ingredients are no more effective when used at higher percentages, also true.

    Where you missed the mark, is in explaining that ingredient manufacturers do tests to develop the benefit statements & claims they provide the potion makers. Potion makers need to know at what percentage an ingredient was used to achieve that benefit or claim. Ingredient manufacturers know that in this industry, many potion makers work to make the most inexpensive product possible that can still make said claims. The result is that most times, benefit data provided to potion makers is cost-consciously-centered around formulation guidelines that deliver the most bang-for-the-buck.

    On some active ingredients, manufacturers will tell a potion maker, “the benefits will continue to increase with a rise in percentage use, but our data cuts off at 7%, so beyond that, you're on your own.” A statement like that from the manufacturer doesn't mean that the product will be no more effective at 9% versus 7%, but just that they didn't see a need to incur testing costs at 8%, 9%, 10% and so on.

    You mean well Albert, that absolutely comes out in your posts. Just remember that if you make blanket statements and disrespect the path some good companies are taking to make great products for their customers, you're actually adding to the cloud of confusion that exists in the market today.

    Best of luck with your new product line and I hope you find a marketing strategy that benefits you and at the same time, doesn't disparage other companies.

  • March 25, 2009

    by Linny

    Lee D
    Read your comments on youth revive and used link to website where product sounds too good to be true. Please give more info on results compared to website and its photos. The ingredients sound good and organic is great. Any other users, I'd appreciate your comments too.

  • March 22, 2009

    by Albert

    This is Romira.

    There...... that is better, although for now my email will still be the same till I get the web site up and running and then use the "corporate" email address.

  • March 22, 2009

    by Romira

    To complete the transformation and set the record straight..... Romira's real name is Albert. Can you imagine parents calling an innocent new-born, Albert? Yikes....:))

  • March 22, 2009

    by Romira

    Dear Nameless;

    You make very valid points regarding the marketing of products with negative advertising. I appreciate your professional input.

    However, I am not aware of the fact that I was promoting "my" product for sale by denegrating other products, since I have NO products for sale yet and I am extra careful, at least I think I am, NOT to run down any specific company or its products but merely to illustrate how they do things, possibly unintentionally, to "fool" the consumer into thinking certain things about their products, that for me, a trained chemist, make no sense. As a professional marketer, I would have hoped you would have been able to see my intentions.

    Obviously I failed in what I was/am attempting to do. For that I apologise for giving the wrong impression.

    However, my pet peeve is still with companies that make false claims and non-starter claims from a scientific formulating point of view. My aim is still to try in my own small and possibly ineffective way to expose those transgressions and hopefully save some good and unsuspecting people some time, money and disappointment. I also realise that I do NOT wear a halo, nor am I sufficiently gifted in the realm of communication to be able to make that dent.

    However, when I do have my "product" to sell, you can rest assured that I will NOT rest my claims on negative verbiage since my product will speak for itself, and frankly, I am into my early retirement and money, or its accumulation is not an issue with me and therefore, I don't need to run down anyone in order to build myself or the proct/s up.

    As for my name, it was an honest choice were I was told that its a middle Eastern name meaning "honesty" or something akin to that. It was when I started getting emails that I realised that most seemed to think it was a females name. I immediately disabused everyone of that fact and claimed my "masculinity" back, since there was absolutely NO intention of deceiving anyone for any extraneous reason or financial gain.

    In fact, rather than financial gain, it was my pleasure to formulate products for many of those who contacted me and I sent them the products at no charge... not even the mailing costs, even though they insisted on paying. I am sure that you might think, being a marketing man/woman that I did this to reel them in. WRONG! I did this because I could and for no other reason

    Should I be able to develop a good serum and should people like what they use and appreciate the product, its efficacy and its reasonable price, then I will be happy that I was able to provide an honest product for their hard earned money.

    What I develop with be an honest exchange between myself and those who wish to use my Serum, which is till now nameless and in development..... assuming I know how to "market" it which I am totally clueless on that front.

    I will continue to speak out against products and their ingredients that are, as far as I am concerned, total and outright falsehoods and claims that are totally beyond the pale in terms of ingredient performance and percentages used: ie. Matrixyl at 30% or Argireline at 25% etc.

    So once again please accept my apologies and know that there was no intention to deceive nor am I in the business of running down anyone to promote my own. I am sorry that you inferred that from my desire to expose what I consider "fraudulent misrepresentations" in the world of skin care.

    I will try to be a little more circumspect next time when I am talking of others and their products.

    Be well and safe.

  • March 21, 2009

    by marta

    You are too kind Wok King. Merci mille fois!

  • March 21, 2009

    by Wok King

    Marta, you're an extraordinary person performing a truly exceptional public service with your knowledge, insight and search for truth in aging products.

    Aging is nature's way of telling us that life's longevity, besides genetics, is a reflection of our behavior and personal habits - the diet and nutrition we partake and the way we take care of the largest organ of our body - our skin!

    Having served in the US Army in places as Panama, VietNam, Alaska, and Israel it was unusual for me, a 75 year old Asian to be diagnosed with basal cell carcinoma. And because of dermatitis, I've kept my skin well moisturized, but I'm always on the lookout for some well formulated skin moisturizer/cream that gives health to the skin and, as a side benefit, reduce the signs of aging.

    I enjoy reading the posts by Romira and plan to send him a note.

    Thanks a Trillion!

  • March 20, 2009

    by Nameless

    I used to use a Co-Q10 product by Nivea. In the late 1990's and early 2000's it was an excellent product and kept me as well-preserved as formaldahyde. I was actually carded on my 40th birthday. Then, they changed the formula to one that simply sat like a layer of grease on my skin. Since then I've been searching almost in vain for anything that actually WORKS on me. Most products don't even absorb into my skin, for whatever reason. My skin has gone very downhill due to medical reasons & stress in the past couple of years. I'm using a good Neutrogena anti-oxidant product right now. I would love a genuinely effective product that I can rely upon and won't disappear or change formulas on me.

    Romira, I'm a marketing professional. The danger in marketing your product as I see it is in resting your saleability on the "negative." In other words, "Don't buy those other products because they're not truthful, they use too much ingredient," etc. You can use that in a generic way as a hook, but you still need to have a strong positive push FOR your product and not rely solely upon the negative - ("Theirs sucks, so buy mine by default.") I like the idea of truth and transparency, I think it's viable, but one would need to be very careful with it. Just my 2 cents.

    Btw, yes, using female-sounding nickname would tend to lead people into thinking you are female, when you are not. Was that intentional? Truth and transparency wouldn't necessarily align with that.

    Hope your products succeed. Thanks.

  • March 19, 2009

    by LeeD

    Ordered and received Youth Revive firming mask and lift serum(free moisture mist included-also 10% off next purchase).
    Super fast delivery, ordered Monday morning, received Wednesday afternoon.
    All natural ingredients, matrixyl 3000 @25%, Hyaluronic acid, EGF, Syn-Ake, GABA, Idebone & Pycnogenol, Snap 8, Hexapeptide 3, Marine Collagen, Retinol Palimate, Royal Emu oil, Vitamin Ester C, DMAE...organic base of Aloe and vitamin C. No glycols or parabens. Soduim Laurel and Laureth free. No pesticides were used on any herbs or botanicals used in the products. Other ingredients include Rosemary Oleoresin(ROE), Black Willow bark extract, Grapeseed extract and botanical oils. Can be checked out at www.Results-Health.com Prices better at this site than at Youth Revives site.
    I had been using Nutra Lift. Wasn't too thrilled with how fast Nutra Lift "dried' on my skin. Used the YR serum last night and liked the way it felt going on much better. I will keep you posted in the coming weeks with results.

  • March 17, 2009

    by Julia

    This discussion has been very interesting, and finding a good, but simple skincare system would be a godsend. I hate spending hours and hours trying to decide what might be safe to put on my face.

  • March 13, 2009

    by marta

    If price is an issue, you could also try Derma Radiant, which got a great review by Kate: http://www.truthinaging.com/2009/01/reviewed-and-recommended-derma-radiant-anti-wrinkle-complex.html

  • March 13, 2009

    by C-Ann

    Hi to everyone. I was wondering if anyone has tried Bellaplex and know whether or not this product is effective? It seems to be the least expensive of all. I am 44 and have been blessed with very little fine lines at my age and most guess my age for 30 or younger. But having said that, I to want to keep it that way as long as possible. Can someone tell me if this product is right for me?

  • March 11, 2009

    by KimbaWLion

    As an engineer I do understand the tricks that people can play with numbers, I mean I have even seen vitamin sites that claim pharmecitical grade materials ( I am a VERY large supplement taker )all followed with the appropiate ISO 9001 or 14001 ( which IS pricy and hard to get) and I now even see resveratrol appearing in skin creams with that ISO seal. I have not read ANYWHERE that it helps with ANYTHING on the outside of the body.

    All I know is that the prices of the stuff sold at this spa cost 100s of $$$ and they do sell a lot of it. I know one of the nurse/partners there and while not trying to ever sell me anything she claims their products are better than any non-pharmecitical grades components and work better too. I'll have to try and get a looksie at the bottles and see whats in them, they are always behind the glass and I have not gotten a look at them. Even when I take my daughter to the Dermatologist they have their own antiageing kits, SUCH the deal at $250.00 which maybe nothing to some of us but is currently way of out of my reach. The vast of amount of money that the spa makes is in the use of the lasers and then the need of their products to maintain. There is a Dr. on staff to make sure everything is on the up and up too.

    I know there are no miracle creams, drugs, or anything else that can work better than the new fancy lasers or a scapel. All one can ask for is a fair priced product that does all it can at a price that the masses can afford. It sounds like you are heading there with knowledge and the drive to provide a fair product at a fair price. I am 46 VERY VERY fair skinned, it is only because of my liberal use of spf 50+ sunscreens etc. over the last 25 years etc. that I am often mistaken for the low 30's ( and some partially blind high 20's! )and I REALLY want to keep it that way. In this enviroment it's all one can ask for, a product that says what it has in it what each ingredient does and does what it says will. Sounds like that is what you will do. Trust me I can be as long winded as the best of them. :-) Sorry if I bored anybody else. I as well as others eagerly await Romira's product as it should be greeted for high quality at a fair price. :-)

  • March 11, 2009

    by Suzanne

    The advertisement regarding "I cured my wrinkles" is a fake. I found this posting in another place and noticed the woman's name is different in both postings. The one you have here is Audrey Heath, on the other posting she is called Susan Reynolds. Here is the link:
    http://www.anti-wrinkles.com/anti-aging-secret-discovery.php?t202id=52593&t202kw=anti%20aging%20skin%20care

    This is definitely created by the makers of the wrinkle creams and I am disappointed to see so many people being taken advantage of.

    I would hope that you would post this and advise others of this phony "discovery."

  • March 11, 2009

    by Romira

    To KimbaWlion;

    There definitely are medical grade ingredients that are used in creams. However, those ingredients are there for specific physical medical conditions and are delivered through "patches" or by other delivery systems.

    Once they are designated a medical product and are used to treat an ailment, they require a physicians prescription and a drug identification number. None of the so called "nedical grade" skin care (other than retin A) that I know of requires a medical prescription, and be sure to ask them for the government approval to market this "cosmetic" as a drug and insist to have the doctor sell it to you with a prescription...

    Also be aware of the fact that more of some ingredient is simply NOT better and in fact can be harmful to some. The developers of all those materials give out specs and guidlines (MSDS) about their products and give very clear parameters of what the lowest and the highest percentages in the formulation should be for that specific ingredient amongst a zillion other pieces of information about it from handling, storage, emergency treatment, etc.

    I will give you a glaring example of a "medical grade" moisturizing cream by the name of Alyria and put out by Dr. Takhars Cosmetic Clinic, (I could have chosen dozens other than this one) of how unmedical the ingredients are in their cream....

    Aqua, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Glycerin, Glyceryl Stearate and PEG-100 Stearate, Glycerin, Butylene Glycol, Carbomer, Polysorbate-20, Palmitoyl-Pentapeptide 3, Behenyl Alcohol, Cetyl Palmitate, Polyacrylamide C13-14, Isoparaffin, Laureth-7, Magnesium Aluminum Silicate, Xanthan Gum, Glucose, Carrageenan, Methyl Glucose Sesquistearate, Caprylyl Methicone, Dimethylconol Behenate, Isopentyldiol, Phenoxyethanol, Mangifera Indica (Mango) Seed Butter, Titanium Dioxide, Diazolidinyl Urea, Iodopropynyl Butylcarbamate, Dimethicone, Sodium Hyaluronate, Hydrolyzed Glycosaminoglycans, Tocopheryl Acetate, Methylparaben, Ethylparaben, Propylparaben, Butylparaben.

    Now IF they are listing their ingredients honestly in descending order of the most first, etc., and I think they are, then you will notice that the 6th ingredient after water is CARBOMER (a rheology modifier and emulsion thickener) and is almost never used at anything over 0.07 per w/wt, the norm being around 0.02%. meaning that in any formulation it will only constitute 0.07 of that 100% formula. Now tell me, if that is #6 on the list and we allow that they are using it at 0.07%, then prey tell what are the percentages used for the rest of the ingredients? Obviously next to nothing, including the ONLY active in the formulation listed as #8, other than Hualuronic acid listed much later on which is acceptable IF they are useing the Low Molecular Weight HA and that is only used at about 1% in any formulation (10 % if its a 1% solution of HA).

    The point is that most are simply using this "trick" to sell product under the guise of "medical" formulations.

    Do you recall a "medical product" by the name of Neo Strata? One could only get it from a doctors office and now its available in every drug store (chemist for the British).. and nothing has changed in its formulayion except to add Matrixyl at 5 %. Its all a gimmick!

    Lovely gentle people, even MY soon to appear product is just a cosmetic cream and will definitely show excellent results that will please most people and I consider it to be the best out there. Yet, I would never be so pretentious as to tout it as a medical product and claim that the ingredients cost more money, nor that you will soon be 10,15 or 20 years younger if you use it.

    Yet, as I said before, that the best of creams for anti-aging still cannot compete with the plastic surgeons knife. As long as you know this, then using a wonderful cream/serum with the right ingredients and in the right percentages will not disappoint you. You can only achieve so much with a serum/cream and in todays high technology, you can still acheive a lot.

    In fact, ONE ingredient that I use in my Serum costs more than 98% of what is used in the cream by Dr. Takhars which is mostly "fillers".

    Be well and safe and as usual, I am long winded. :)

  • March 8, 2009

    by KimbaWLion

    Hello peoples,
    Great informational website and I have learned lots. I was using Hydroderm for a bit, actually liked it till I read some of the reviews and stopped. Been looking for something else to use for me and my wife. I think anti-age should be able to fit both at the same time. Though I do have one question. One of the Dr. run Spas here that has pixel and fractal lasers etc. sells anti-aging serums etc. but they all say and claim its cosmetics etc. are ALL medical grade materials which they say are pricier since they are all ISO GMP certified etc. I like the idea of Romira's line since it sounds like it is going to be priced right and simple with 2 products but how would it and any other "non" medical grade compare with so called medical grade materials that the spas sell I wonder. I use ROC serum at the moment because I needed something that may was priced right and I want to see what Romira brings out. That is what I want to see. :-) Thanks again for all the info!

  • March 5, 2009

    by Romira

    I neglected to answer you Christine, sorry.

    You can contact me at romira_myra@hotmail.com and I will be happy to answer any questions you may have, although I doubt I can do as good a job at that as Marta does. Her knowledge truly is impressive... and NO, I am not brown-nosing. I truly mean it.

  • March 5, 2009

    by Romira

    Christine and to all the others, including once again my thanks to Marta and her wonderful forum..... I am a consumer just as all of us are and I am just as discouraged at times with what is out there and at the confusion created.

    I have reworked the Serum I am coming up with to include STEM CELL technology (as well as NOT using the Hyaluronic acid at 30%. opting for the much more expensive low molecular weight HA used at only 1%. yet one that will actually penetrate the skin layers and act as a delivery system for some of the other actives. So 1% in the formulation is infinitely better that 100% of the Hyasol-BT HA as used by both myself previously and what others still use) that I was able to aquire from a major researcher/producer in the active ingredient neutraceautical field. I am satisfied that the research was done correctly and that the double blind tests were ethical and fair and not tanted by the company in question making sure that the results conform with what they want them to conform to. Besides, this company, as most of the large researchers do not play such games and truly want to know how their products perform.

    In any case, the formulation is now finalised and I will not add or delete anything else from it. Hopefully my web site will be done in the next short while and I will post it here.

    However, PLEASE always keep in mind that whatever you are dealing with and regardless of who makes the product, that what you have is a CREAM/SERUM etc. and NOT a trip to the plastic surgeon and nor should you expect the same results because you would be terribly disappointed if you do so.

    However, within the context of such products there should be knowledge about the ingredients and what they accomplish for the user and why they were selected by the formulator. My web site will take each ingredient and explain what it is and why I chose it. There will be lots to read for those who are interested in knowing and can be ignored by those who are not. The point is, the site will give you, the consumer, a choice.

    I will also promise in all sincerity to keep the price reasonable, although I worry that a low price would play into the hands of the perception that a low price makes the product NOT too good in the eyes of most. the "you get what you pay for" impression prevelent out there.

    I will strive to offer the product (60 ml, although the fill level is at 66 ml) at a very reasonable price. I will always want to have an honest exchange between my newly formed company and the consumer so that both are satisfied in that I get a good return on my money and the consumer also gets a superb product for their money. That is a promise!

    There I go rambling again. :))

    Also, apparently my nick that I use imparts the idea that I am a female. I am not female, unfortunately, since I wish I were because I truly love the feminine and womankind.

    I am trying to think of a nick to use since I am told that its "dangerous" to use my own real name. hmm

  • March 4, 2009

    by marta

    Kelly
    I haven't tried Dermaware or Tzone and neither of them give the full list of ingredients for their products. So, the short answer is no. I do wish that manufacturers' would put more comprehensive information online. Why would anyone buy something when they don't know what's in it?

  • March 3, 2009

    by Kelly Wishard

    I just found this forum and am so glad I did. I am tired of buying products that simply don't work. Marta, I was wondering if you had any information on Dermaware products and T-zone.

  • March 2, 2009

    by Christine

    PS- I should have specified also that they need to do what claim to do!

  • March 2, 2009

    by Christine

    "February 19th, 2009 at 7:00 pm
    john allen

    i think our product should be on the top 5 list :) - DermaRadiant Anti Wrinkle Complex - how can i get it considered?

    john"

    John:
    I just looked into the DermaRadiant product- original retail was somewhere in the $50 range- looks like it has now been dropped to $39. I read in another post on this site, some praises of your product BUT- I do NOT like the idea of auto-ship!!! I have been burned too often on auto-pay/auto-ship.
    Additionally, a clear list of ingredients (just a laundry list, please, clearly posted and indicating the percentage of product ingredients contained) would be lovely. I don't need to be SOLD; I have a fairly clear idea of which ingredients do what and how they work.
    And finally (this is a BIG one for me): NATURAL INGREDIENTS ARE ALWAYS PREFERABLE. Many of us have very sensitive skin and we don't respond well to heavy scents, parabens , alcohols, etc. in our facial products. I know it is tough to make products without these ingredients and that natural ones degrade or lose efficacy with certain combinations or over time, but it can be done well.

    Natural, gentle plant based products with an excellent price point and a clear, detailed list of ingredients and their concentrations (think the back of a bottle of vitamins!) are always going to be my preference.
    Thanks!

  • March 2, 2009

    by Christine

    Greetings!
    I am so glad to have come across this forum. Marta, your insights are invaluable, as are all the other posters who have taken the time to write in.

    Romira:
    I love your dive in and get it done right approach!
    Where/when can I buy your products?

    How much are they? (Cost is a BIG factor for many of us indulging in products right now!)

    Can I buy from you or contact you directly?

    My sincere thanks to everyone!

    -Christine

  • February 19, 2009

    by john allen

    i think our product should be on the top 5 list :) - DermaRadiant Anti Wrinkle Complex - how can i get it considered?

    john

  • February 19, 2009

    by Romira

    Oh, by the way, I also developed a wonderful Moisturizer to go along with the Anti-wrinkle and Firming Serum. So now I have two products and I think I will stop there since the Serum can be used as an eyes treatment as well as a neck and decollete firming treatment as well.

    A woman can save a lot of money using just one product that actually works as advertised.

    Well, back to working on the web site on my adobe illustrator (still learning how to use it)

  • February 19, 2009

    by Romira

    My eternal thanks to Marta, whomever she is.

    I am grateful that she allows freedom of discussion on this site and equally allows freedom to possibly communicate one with the other without censorship or interference. Thank you Martha!

    Well, I have finally finished my formulation as I said that I would, and it is, if I may say so (as mentioned to Marta) an ode to simplicity and elegance in its composition: a Wagnarian symphony that is at once powerful and nourishing to the soul as mine is to the skin. An honest approach without hype, without any fillers and without any obfuscation whatsoever.

    I will not hide any of the facts about the formulation, explaining in detail each and every ingredient that I used synergistically with the others on the web site I am now finalising. I will also have a section on the site that will take to task, in a polite way, the misinformation given by so many about their products simply to sell product.

    I will explain how formulea are developed and how to really read an ingredient listing and make sense of it, assuming those advertising it are telling the truth.

    I will also answer the incredible hype behind the so called stem cell technology that Amatokin is riding on and that its NOT what they claim and there is NO substantive tests to verify any of their claims and that basically IF it does what they claim it does, that then it becomes a drug and needs a prescription.

    I use a combination of actives, and ONLY actives, that interact one with the other. I will NOT become like an auction where we now see..... "we have Argireline at 25%... "do I hear 30?........ we have 30, do I hear 40?

    I use argeline in the way it was intended to be used by Lipotec when they developed it and ex[erimented with it at 5 and a maximum of 10%. I will also explain on the web site why I used Argireline at 5% and why, by combining it with a synergistic peptide at also 5%, that the effect of the anti-wrinkle results is much better than using Argireline at 10% by itself. That is something a knowledgeable chemist should know about.

    The name has also been chosen and registered (I work fast.. :) ) as has the packaging which will hopefully (if I can get the right quantities) will be a nice frosted glass bottle with an elegant treatment dispenser (NO airless bottles for me thank you very much).

    If you wish, I will list the ingredients I have used in honest descending order.

    For now, I thank those who have indicated a desire to contact me by asking that they write to romira_myra@hotmail.com if they still wish to do so.

    Thanks again Marta!

    (no spell check as usual)

  • February 19, 2009

    by marta

    In both cases the active ingredients look good, but we'd need to see the full list to have a better idea. We'll try to get some samples and get back to you.

  • February 19, 2009

    by LeeD

    Marta(or anyone who has feedback)
    I'm researching skin care products and would like to know if anyone knows anything about Youth Revive(who's ingredients seem to be great)and AnnaBellina.

    thanks

  • February 18, 2009

    by Jonas

    Thanks for all the info published here

    Any chance to get in contact with Romira, would be appreciated

    naturalpotion@yahoo.se

  • February 18, 2009

    by To Romira

    Dear Romira,
    I have been reading all your posts with great interest, as I came across this site while researching some specific skin care ingredients and products. The laboratory that processes and compounds the ingredients and I have been in preliminary marketing talks. The products from this lab have been very successful for me.

    You and I share very common interests when it comes to scientific support for product claims, affordability, as well as ethical business and marketing practices in the skin care market.

    Potentially I have the marketing interests and resources that you are looking for in a partner to move your compounds forward and into the market place, especially via the internet.

    You can contact me at Noblegrace2001@yahoo.com.

  • February 18, 2009

    by LeeD

    Was wondering about a product called Dermaxin. Contains matrixyl 3000, argireline etc... Anyone tried this or know anything about it?

    Thanks

  • February 10, 2009

    by Will

    Dear Romira,

    Any contact info so you could be reached in regards to "partner"?
    Thanks!
    usgem@aol.com

  • February 5, 2009

    by Lees

    this is to Del Bryant..You said :
    " always ask several initial questions of anything I put on my face. A “no” to any of these is a deal breaker for me:
    Is it pH balanced?
    Is it non-comedogenic?
    Is it safe for sensitive skin?
    Is it unscented and perfume free? To my skin, scent is always an irritant. "

    What soap (facial cleanser) and lotion have you found that works for you. I'm desperate!

  • January 25, 2009

    by Amytim

    1.Lotioncrafter
    2.Herbarie
    I love them.
    (Pure matrixyl for diy skincare)

  • January 24, 2009

    by Romira

    Forgive all my typos. I really can spell. I simply cannot type with my two finger hunt and peck technique which quite often has me landing on the wrong keys. It does not help that I also don't check my spelling before clicking on the Submit button.

  • January 24, 2009

    by Romira

    I am sorry if I am annoying anyone with my posts, although from the dates shown, very few are here to read what I am saying anyhow.

    Regardless, I am doing it because I dislike dishonesty in claims. I just came across a product by the name of Faitox 25 and they illustrate perfectly what I mean:

    keep in mind that ANY formulation has to be made up to 100.0 % It cannot be above 100.0 Yet, this company claims Hyasol- BT from Pentapharm in Awtzerland at 50% per W/W ( that is per 100 wieght in the formula of 100.0): they claim Argireline at 25% per W/W: Matrixyl at 15% per W/W: Snap-8 at 10% per W/W......... Add them all up and you get 100.0...... that is the formulation. YET, they claim they also have water, Vitamin C, Vitamin E and phenonip in the formula. Where did they put all those items since they already reached 100,0 with the actives they claim.

    Either they made a tremendous mistake in typing the percentages, or they deliberately are misleading the public. I would love to hear an explanation from them about how they can do this type of "magica;" formulations.

    I sent them an email asking them about this and I am not holding my breath till I hear back from them.

    Alsp, on this web site, I see some products with ingredients a mile long. That is possible although one has to sacrifice eficacy of the product to jam them all in there. If they claim 29 ingredients, then divide 100.0 by 29 and you get an average of 3.4%, excluding the water phase. IF they have Argireline at 15% and Matrixyl at 10% for example, then you have to reduce ALL the other infredients by 25% to make it to 100.0, which means that you end up with a formula FILLED with impressive sounding ingredients that will be of no benefit to you because they are at percentages that will not do you any good. But the label is beautiful. :)

    Most times, the LESS one has in the formula the better, as long as those in the formula are at percentages that work.

    I will now give it a rest.

  • January 24, 2009

    by Romira

    It occurs to me to ask Marta if she knows of any such person who might be interested in such a venture and who in fact can do the marketing.

    This seed is germinating in my brain and I am excited about the possibilities and prospects for building a successful enterprise now that I am looking more closely at what is out there. This person, by the way, would NOT have to put up a single penny since I will finance the entire venture from start to end as well as handle the packaging and design. They would simply have to know how to successfully market the product on the world- wide- web.

    Hmm..... this is intriguing. :)

  • January 24, 2009

    by Romira

    Marta

    You are most kind in your words and they are appreciated.

    Developing the line (I would only come up with two items: an anti-wrinkle//firming serum and a moisturizer to go with it as a combination) would be the simple thing. The difficulty comes in how does one sells it to the public.

    Unless I have a "partner" who can do that end of it successfully by selling it on the net, it becomes somewhat problematic for me.

    In fact, I have already come up with magnificent formulations for both products since I posted here. Now its just a matter of putting it all together in my well equipped home laboratory over the weekend (I still dable in formulations and cannot get used to retirement, and manufacturers like Sederma, Lipotec, Cognis and many others are happy to supply me with any raw material that I need to work with) :)

    That is the easy part....... Now, if I can find someone to do the marketing, then "we" are in business in no time at all and hopefully on the way to building an honest and ethical company with ethical products and transparency, since I would have nothing to hide and can, without fear, claim that "our" products are the best money can buy, regardless of company name, manufacturer or country of origin.

    I will work on that part and keep you posted.

  • January 23, 2009

    by Scott Rubin

    Well, from a male perspective of horrible and painful (chemical peels for 20 yrs) Phenol for those who like pain!! For me it was deep acne scars..so allow me to make your lives easier.

    Since i have had to investigate everything "living or dead" for my skin this is what i have come up with...

    If you want a non invasive boost to COLLAGEN. get yourself a (Pro fractional laser resurface) I guarantee for a little cost and even less pain you wont know who you are!

    In Florida we have one of the worlds best...(he also travels around the US) Dr Jason Pozner. You can look him up at http://www.smacboca.com/#. Feel free to mention Scott Rubin..I am his greatest FAN!

    He sells NEOCUTIS...I am a big FAN!

    I use a product called MAMA LOTION by MCK labs..get it at skincareRX.com

    I use Dr. Perricones ADVANCED FIRMING FACIAL ACTIVATOR...I AM A BIG FAN..

    I am a fan of ISOMERS and use the mens under eye serum with PENTAPEPTIDE 7!

    I use LUMIERE FROM NEOCUTIS in conjunction..for under eye...

    I also like ISOMERS EYELASH PROTEIN...I buy direct from there site in Canada!

    The most dramatic difference has come with MAMA LOTION at less than $40.00 it last me 4-6 months used every other day!

    I have no objection to answering any question and you can e-mail me at shmta@aol.com

    Happy learning...hopefully not as painfully as me!

  • January 23, 2009

    by marta

    Romira - you should bring out your own line. A lot of consumers would appreciate some transparency. Go girl!

  • January 23, 2009

    by Romira

    Another way of looking at it is this: Argireline is selling at something like $400.00/kg (2.2 lbs) divide $400.00 by 1,000 (that is a kg) and you come up with a figure of .40 cents/g. now if you claim that you have 25% Argireline in your formulation, then multiply .40 cents x 25 (that is the % in the formulation) and you get a cost of $10.00/ bottle just for the one ingredient. Matrixyl 3000 is around $600.00/kg.... $600.00 divided by 1,000 (that is a kg) is .60 cents per W/W by 15% that they claim works out to $9.00 for thaat ingredient/bottle. Now we are up to $19.00 cost on only TWO ingredients. Add, the Snap-8 and other peptides and you are past $40.00/bottle excluding packaging.

    It does not make sense at all, because they are not telling the truth and are merely making claims to sell product and ones they cannot substantiate.

    Hopefully the moderator will publish this and not sensor it for some reason, and that it will help to make choices a little more clear for users and how to discriminate on product claims.

  • January 23, 2009

    by Romira

    ......... Equally, claims like Argireline @ anything above 10% per W/W are totally useless since the most effective percentage is 10% and Lipotec recommends its use at 5%.

    I wish there was some way the public can get their hands on the scientific data given to formulators by the companies that make those active ingredients so that they can then make intelligent choices and not just go by "label claims".

    Romira

  • January 23, 2009

    by Romira

    I find the reviews most interesting even though so much emphasis is placed on the percentages of the ingrefients in question, such as Matrixyl 3000.

    As a retired head of R/D of a huge multinational cosmetic company, I can assure you that almost all the percentages given by the overwhelming majority of manufacturers making most silly claims like Matrixyl 3000 @ 15% and even higher, are a joke and ones you should stay away from.

    Sederma, that manufactures Matrixyl and Matrixyl 3000 states catagorically in there scientific literature that Matrixyl is to be used between 2 and 8% per W/W in the formula, and that Matrixyl 3000 is best suited and effective at 3%. Anything more is a total waste of money since neither one of them is linear. In other words 10 is not more effective than 9.999, etc. Its like trying to fill a 10 oz. cup with 11 oz's of liquid. You merely waste that extra.

    I am now tempted to finally bring out my own anti wrinkle// firming and moisturizing serum, now that I have seen the charletain claims on the net simply to sell products. Its disheartening to see companies so abuse the unknowing public who buy their product in good faith.

    Romira

  • January 20, 2009

    by Elisa Lewis

    I am 47 years old I am into natural and organic products I am looking for a great skin care product that will firm my skin and lift it also I have deep lines under my eyes follow by bags I need help I have try so many eye creams with no results. I have even had eye surgery not happy.

  • January 3, 2009

    by Ann Stewart

    Have you tried NCN Professional Skin Care's 15% Matrixyl 3000 Serum? It's $35 for 1 oz. Site: http://www.ncnproskincare.com/virtuemart/133.html.

    I haven't tried it yet, am about to order it.

  • December 7, 2008

    by marta

    Any of the ones listed in this post would be a good choice. We've tried them and know they work. Also check out this: YNS Cell Renewal ($59.95). YNS has two types of vitamin A - retinol and retinyl propionate. Retinyl propionate is less irritating than retinol. However, it may not be a particularly good anti-ager. A 1998 study in the UK followed more than 60 people for 48 weeks after which the researchers declared that retinyl propionate didn't work for photoageing (there was no statistical difference between the skin results of the retin and placebo users). The good news is that the few acne sufferers in the study showed complete recovery. So with retinol as the anti-ager and propionate to keep the acne at bay, you have a two in one.

  • December 6, 2008

    by Jessica

    I am 36 and looking for a good product or series of products to being my anti-aging regime. I have used a variety of products up until now; however, they were generally for moisturizing and acne treatment. There are so many products available and so much information available, I'm not sure where to begin.

  • September 2, 2008

    by marta

    <p>This is Nutra-Lift's response to my question as to what is in the antioxidant 14: "Antioxidant complex 14 is a proprietary blend of several natural anti-oxidants & bioflavinoids that includes extracts from Olive leaf, Orange Peel, rosemary, sage , and turmeric....which all are very beneficial to the skin."</p>

  • September 1, 2008

    by marta

    <p>Overall, its difficult to say without knowing what is in anti-oxidant 14 (I've written to ask them). Otherwise, its lots of glycerins and coconut oil, plus botanicals. There are some good vitamin Bs, such as niacinamide and inositol. </p>

    <p>Coco betaine is a mild, coconut oil, derivate of cocamide and glycine betaine. Usually non-irritant but some studies suggest it is an allergan.</p>

    <p>Sodium coco sulfate comes from coconut and is used as an alternative to sodium lauryl sulfate, which can be an irritant.</p>

    <p>I would bet that HEC is hydroxyethyl cellulose. A thickening agent.</p>

  • August 31, 2008

    by Lori

    <p>Just wanted to see what you thought of the over all ingredient list of Nutra Lifts cleansing gel - Certified organic aloe vera gel, cocamide betaine, potassium coconate, wheat germate, sodium coco-sulfate, anti-aging anti-oxidant complex 14, HEC , butylene glycol, vegetable glycerin, ascorbly glucosamine (vitamin C), sodium pca, hyaluronic acid, xantium gum, grapefruit seed extract, natural mixed tocopheryls (vitamin E), ethoxydiglycol, coltsfoot extract, calcium pantothenate, birch sap extract, horesetail extract, nettle extract, red clover extract, sage extract, peppermint extract, orange extract, yarrow extract, inositol, colloidal sulphur, rosemary extract, witch hazel, wheat germ extract, retinyl palmiitate(vitamin A), niaciamide, thiamine, hcl, collodial minerals. </p>

    <p>and specifically - sodium coco-sulfate, cocamide betaine, HEC, sodium pca, hcl.</p>

    <p>In addition - how do we know what the ingredients of anti-oxidant complex 14 are.</p>

    <p>Thank you in advance for your time spent! <br />
    I too am very thankful for your TIA site and appriciate all your hard work!</p>

  • August 30, 2008

    by Lori

    <p>After learning of the formula change in Mychelle Supreme, I was on the hunt for a new matrixyl 3000 potion. I finaly decided on Nutra-Lift Rejuventing Therapy which I just purchase on Amazon for $47 after shipping. To my surprise they included a 4oz cleansing gel at no charge. :) </p>

  • August 28, 2008

    by Del Bryant

    <p>Hello: I always ask several initial questions of anything I put on my face. A "no" to any of these is a deal breaker for me:<br />
    Is it pH balanced? <br />
    Is it non-comedogenic? <br />
    Is it safe for sensitive skin?<br />
    Is it unscented and perfume free? To my skin, scent is always an irritant. </p>

    <p>I'd appreciate any comments your readers might offer. <br />
    </p>

  • August 28, 2008

    by marta

    <p>Thanks Marty. We looked into galactoarabinan in this post: <a href="http://www.truthinaging.com/2008/07/what-is-it-galactoarabinan.html" rel="nofollow">http://www.truthinaging.com/2008/07/what-is-it-galactoarabinan.html</a></p>

  • August 28, 2008

    by Marty brenner

    <p>One of the best ingredients for getting rid of lines is Galactoarabinan. It is totaly natural and I have seen dramatic results from its use. It seems to be forgotten but can be a great additive to any cosmetic product.</p>

  • August 26, 2008

    by marta

    <p>I started to use the Nutra-Lift last week - too early to tell. But I will write a review in a couple of weeks. </p>

    <p>I agree with you about Mychelle and I love their Mist. Unfortunately, I wasn't too impressed by the new formulation of Supreme:<br />
    <a href="http://www.truthinaging.com/2008/08/reviewed-and-rejected-mychelles-supreme-the-new-formula.html" rel="nofollow">http://www.truthinaging.com/2008/08/reviewed-and-rejected-mychelles-supreme-the-new-formula.html</a></p>

  • August 26, 2008

    by Susan

    <p>Marta, have you used Nutra-Lift Rejuventing Therapy? Also, I tend to be skeptical about the Failon-25 because it has such a high content of the matrixyl 3000. Seems too good to be true. I will be interested in your assessment. I also just ordered the Mychelle polypeptide cream through amazon. I have used it before and liked it but now don't know what I will think about the new ingred (Marine Oligopeptides). You said that you thought you might try it. Have you? What I like about the mychelle product is the lack of harmful ingredients (no parabens, triethanolamine and the likes). </p>

  • August 24, 2008

    by marta

    <p>Hi Susan,<br />
    Faitox-25 is new to me. But having taken a look at the website, I am impressed. It has a hefty dose of matrixyl 3000 and snap 8 (which I think is a new and improved - and more expensive - form of argireline). I've ordered a bottle and will let you know how I get on. </p>

  • August 24, 2008

    by Susan

    <p>Has anyone tried faitox-25? It boasts 15% matrixyl 3000. This is the greatest % I have seen. Does anyone know anything about this product? Thanks in advance.</p>

  • August 12, 2008

    by marta

    <p>And we are glad that you found us. A complete line is a challenge and I generally like to pick and choose specific things. But if you want to "tighten and get immediate results", I would try the Your Best Face range. Not cheap, but a little goes a long way. Not easy to get either: try their website and order online:<br />
    <a href="http://www.ybf-skincare.com/products/ybf_products.htm" rel="nofollow">http://www.ybf-skincare.com/products/ybf_products.htm</a></p>

  • August 12, 2008

    by Sandy Schuyler

    <p>I'm glad I found this website. I'm 60 and I'm still reading and exploring new products for products that will help improve my facial skin even if it is in appearance only. Any suggestions of a complete line that would tighten and show immediate results and still be good to use on a daily basis?</p>

  • August 1, 2008

    by Mike626

    <p>That's true, but they are about to launch a brand new site, and recently posted some preview pics:</p>

    <p><a href="http://www.websitetoolbox.com/tool/post/skinactives/vpost?id=2871887" rel="nofollow">http://www.websitetoolbox.com/tool/post/skinactives/vpost?id=2871887</a></p>

  • August 1, 2008

    by marta

    <p>That would make sense because I tried to search all sorts of variations and didn't come up with anything. Thank you Mike - and, of course, Hannah. Skin Actives is a brilliant resource (although they could do with a web designer).</p>

  • August 1, 2008

    by Mike626

    <p>According to the lovely and talented Hannah at SAS:</p>

    <p>"[it] is a typo for PPG-12/SMDI COPOLYMER, a not very inspiring ingredient, a copolymer of saturated methylene diphenyldiisocyanate and PPG-12 (propylene glycol)monomers."</p>

  • July 31, 2008

    by marta

    <p>Nikkomulese (sorry, it has only one 'l') is actually pretty boring. Its an emulsifier that is made up of Cyclopentasiloxane, PEG-10 Dimethicone and Disteardimonium Hectorite.</p>

    <p>PPGSMDI Co-Polymer is a bit trickier. I think it is actually PPG MDI Copolymer (a polymer is a molecule). This may be some kind of polyurethane. The only specific reference I found was as an adhesive. Perhaps a chemist will write in and help us out. </p>

  • July 31, 2008

    by Lori

    <p>Actually, I did a little research and found that Nutra-Lift Rejuventing Therapy's website had a complete list of ingredients. This is added after the last ingredient on the list above. ( vitamin A) ppgsmdi co-polymer., l-tyrosine, zinc sulfate, squalene, colloidal minerals. </p>

    <p>Still interested in what ppgsmdi co-polymer and nikkomullese are. </p>

  • July 31, 2008

    by Lori

    <p>what is nikkomullese & ppg?</p>

  • July 31, 2008

    by marta

    <p>Amazon has it on offer:<br />
    <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Rejuvenating-Tissue-Repair-Formula-Now-Matrixyl/dp/B000FI4W06/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=hpc&qid=1217519650&sr=1-3" rel="nofollow">http://www.amazon.com/Rejuvenating-Tissue-Repair-Formula-Now-Matrixyl/dp/B000FI4W06/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=hpc&qid=1217519650&sr=1-3</a></p>

  • July 31, 2008

    by Lori

    <p>Where can I purchuse Nutra-Lift Rejuventing Therapy? </p>

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