I opened a copy of the latest In Style the other day and was assaulted by a double page advertisement for  Fusion Beauty LiftFusion Facelift To Go. Three things intrigued me: the implausible claims that it delivers visible results after 10 minutes and nine out of 10 women preferred it to Botox; the use of scientific gobbledy-gook like M-tox and micro-injected; it has been awarded the Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval.  Heck, I've switched laundry detergent brands on the basis of a Good Housekeeping recommendation. Maybe LiftFusion Facelift to Go isn't as silly as it looks.

Taking a closer look at the product description, my suspicions were pricked. "Patented blend of natural ingredients", "boosts collagen", "effective right away, but completely reversible in 24 hours". What? If the effects disappear within 24 hours, what exactly is the point? This must be one of those creams like Athena 7 Minute Lift or Freeze 24-7 that do a short lived and not very effective job of preventing facial muscles to move. What is Good Housekeeping thinking of? Still it is the venerable Seal of Approval. It merited finding out exactly what LiftFusion contains.

Digging around amongst the ingredients of LiftFusion Eye Lift is fascinating. This cream has it all: the good, the weird and the ugly.

I must admit, there are a couple of good things going for LiftFusion Eye Lift.
It contains a powerful anti-oxidant called matrixyl 3000 (a combination
of two specific peptides) and hyaluronate. The thing about these ingredients is that they need to be at high concentrations to be effective. In LiftFusion, they appear way down the ingredients list implying that they are used in relatively low doses.

It is a somewhat weird ingredient that dominates LiftFusion Eye Lift. Amino Butyric Acid is also known as GABA. It inhibits neurotransmitters - so this is what gives results in 10 minutes by preventing the muscles from moving. In this respect, it is like acetyl-hexapeptide-3 (to be found in Athena 7 Minute Lift and Freeze 24-7). GABA has been purported to increase the amount of Human Growth Hormone. The results of those studies have seldom been replicated so the jury remains out. Nevertheless, expect to see Human Growth Hormone and GABA cropping up in 2008's potions and lotions. GABA can be found in Dr Brandt's Crease Release, IQ Derma and a new product to be launched by Freeze 24-7 called Treatment Cream.

So far, we could give LiftFusion and Good Housekeeping the benefit of the doubt and even turn a blind eye to the use of polisilicone-11 that just coats the skin and does nothing for it in the long run. But then we get to the ugly. Sodium Polyacrylate can absorb 200 to 300 times its weight in water. Does this mean it will dry your skin out? Worse though is that this ingredient was banned from tampons for being linked to toxic shock syndrome. Now, it is used in disposable diapers, so it can't be all bad. According to a lobby group that wants the stuff banned, it has caused female organ problems, slows healing wounds, fatigue and weight loss amongst the women factory workers that make it.

LiftFusion Eye Lift also contains barium sulphate, this is what you drink before an X-ray. Barium is considered to be dangerously toxic. Barium sulphate compound is less soluble, making it harder for the body to absorb, and therefore nominally safer. Mind you, if it isn't going to be absorbed, what purpose does it serve in a cream? It is nothing more than white pigment.

Good Housekeeping, giving your prestigious seal to LiftFusion may have been a little hasty.