glo pop 3 day teeth whitener

Reviewed by Marta on November 23, 2015


I regard teeth whitening as part of our anti-aging arsenal. A dazzling smile can take years off; conversely, stained teeth look like old teeth. While I love my Philips Sonic toothbrush and give it most of the credit for a decent set of pegs, I hate those clunky trays, ghastly gels and whitening strips that fall off. All of which means I was very excited to test the Glo Pop 3 Day Weekend Whitener ($28), a set of dab-and-go teeth whiteners.

Glo Pop boasts “no strips, no trays, no sensitivity.” The promises were delivered. I was especially impressed by the lack of sensitivity. I don’t have super sensitive teeth, but I always find that Crest’s 3D strips leave me reacting to hot and cold for about 24 hours. Nothing like that with Glo Pop. I also liked that the gel wasn’t acrid and gloopy, just fresh tasting. But the best thing about Glo Pop is the ease of application.

At first I was a little disconcerted by the “vial” resembling a baby’s pacifier. However, it doesn’t require being sucked on. In fact, you simply remove the cap to reveal a few plastic, flexible “bristles,” squeeze gently and brush the teeth until the gel foams up a bit. It all takes seconds.

My 3 Day Weekend Whitener set required me to do this three times a day. While, nothing could be easier, I did manage to forget my third dab on the second day Compliance with these things can be an issue.

Personally, I thought my teeth looked a bit brighter from the first dab. Any evidence of the morning’s black coffee seemed to be erased. And certainly my teeth looked white by a shade or so after the full three days. I should note that my teeth were not really stained to begin with and I cannot vouch if they would work for someone in need of a real transformation — perhaps the 10-day Glo Pop program would be better in this case.

This wouldn’t be a Truth In Aging review if I didn’t comment on the ingredients. The actives are the standard whiteners, hydrogen peroxide (bleach) and sodium hydroxide (caustic soda). Nothing to smile about, but they do their job.

As for the fact that Glo Pop is not sensitizing, well that is down to the inclusion of potassium nitrate. There is research that suggests that a potassium nitrate toothpaste could help mitigate against discomfort caused by using teeth whiteners in tray or strip form. According the study, which used a 5% concentration of potassium nitrate, it blocks the action of the intradental nerves and decreases the perception of pain.

An intriguing addition is edetate disodium. This is sometimes used in food as a preserving agent, but I like the fact that it is a chelator that binds to heavy metals (that can be present in our water — read more on this subject) such as aluminum, nickel and lead. When bound, they are removed from the body and have no harmful effect.

Overall, I am pleased with Glo Pop experience and results and they will be replacing whitening strips in my bathroom.