Fun Facts:

Proctor & Gamble researchers began research and development for a new anti-dandruff shampoo in 1950.

Head & Shoulders was first introduced to the U.S. market in November 1961, as a blue-green shampoo containing pyrithione zinc (first introduced by Revlon in ZP11 shampoo).

After several years of declining U.S. market share, Proctor & Gamble gave Head & Shoulders a facelift with a new formula, fragrance, and bottle design.

The company's copper orange "Extra Strength" shampoo had a cameo role in the 2001 film Evolution.

Company News/Recent Launches:

Head & Shoulders ran an interactive outdoor campaign in Singapore, featuring more than 5,000 promotional stickers over the dark hair of a model to simulate dandruff flakes.

Key Ingredients:

The line's active anti-dandruff agent, zinc pyrithione (1%), kills pityrospora.

Sodium laureth sulfate (and its closely related cousin ammonium laureth sulfate) is a foaming detergent.

Zinc carbonate is an opacifying agent.

TIA's Take:

Everyone knows Head & Shoulders as basic hair cleaning on a budget. Though the brand is a pioneer in combatting scalp itch, dryness, and flakes, Head & Shoulder's shampoos can't cure dandruff entirely. A combination of anti-fungal agents has been proven more effective at eliminating the root cause of dandruff than zinc pyrithione alone (the primary active component of Head & Shoulders hair products). The company's six-year ad campaign, which claimed its products to leave users "100% dandruff-free," came under fire for misleading consumers. The Advertising Standards Authority ruled that its slogan needed to be amended to clarify that only visible flakes would be reduced with regular use. Additionally, Head & Shoulders purports that its pH balanced formulas are gentle enough for color-treated or permed hair, but the harsh surfactants common to these products lead us to think otherwise. For truly flake-free hair, we would recommend a more powerful, less abrasive treatment combined with a DIY dandruff shampoo.