Overview:

Herbal Essences was originally targeted at women with an interest in holistic and natural products. In the 1990s and 2000s, Herbal Essences' advertisements featured women mimicking orgasms while shampooing their hair with the company's products.

The Good:

Herbal Essences products are not tested on animals and parent company Procter & Gamble has invested over $250 million to stop animal testing. The company also offers how-to videos on the website instructing product users how to get the looks seen in Herbal Essences campaigns. There are some interesting ingredients in their products such as pomegranate which is an antioxidant.

The Bad:

They’re one of the more “herbal” brands in the drugstore aisle but far from it when compared to shampoos we actually recommend. Herbal Essences has sodium sulfates and preservatives that we would rather not have on our bodies. The ingredients overall aren’t the best, fragrance and artificial coloring make this a  product that we wouldn't use on ourselves as Marta rejected it.

The Truth:

Herbal Essences' website is both user-friendly and fun, with links to the company's social networking features, look books, and quizzes leading consumers to the right product for their hair type. Despite accusations to the contrary from animal rights groups, Procter & Gamble maintains that they do not test Herbal Essences products or Procter & Gamble grooming products on animals. What Herbal Essences doesn't try to deny, but certainly attempts to downplay with the prominent display of fancy extracts and diamond dust, is that most, if not all of their shampoos contain sodium laurel sulfate, sodium laureth sulfate, and cyclopentasiloxane. Herbal Essences may be one of the better picks in the drugstore aisle but it falls short when compared to better products. The lack of natural ingredients has this “herbal” brand masquerading as something it’s not, avoid it if possible.