Jan Marini is usually at the cutting edge of skin care (she practically invented the eyelash growth market, as far as I am concerned). So when she says she has brought out "an entirely new concept in topical anti-aging", even old curmudgeons like me take notice.

Her latest and greatest is a facial mask and I've been testing it for the past week. It's too early to give it a "reviewed and recommended", as this is no instant gratification mask. Age Intervention Regeneration Facial Mask ($90) is about skin rebuilding - and that doesn't happen after a 10-minute pack-and-rinse. I have a hunch, though, that this is going to make it into TIA's Five Best facial masks in the not too distant future. The immediate result is tighter, softer skin that looks rejuvenated and I'm in danger of getting a bit addicted to it.

Marini's website talks a lot about "breakthrough technologies" and "a sophisticated dual action occlusion and delivery system". As this didn't really mean a lot to me, I went foraging on the internet for information about the one of the key ingredients, pichia/resveratrol ferment extract. Resveratrol is the component in grapes that does all the antioxidant work and it is common in many cosmetic ingredients. The twist here is that it is manufactured using fermentation with pichia pastoris. This is a kind of yeast and, to cut a long story short, it is given - fed - resveratrol as a nutrient while the yeast sets about replicating its cells. The yeast converts the resveratrol into something that is more bioavailable. This means, in theory, that the resveratrol is now more compatible with our skin cells and, thereby, more effective. The company that does all this says that in an in vivo study, there was a reduction in "fine lines and wrinkles following a 28-day application, as well as firming and lifting of the skin to reduce notable sagging that was present prior to treatment".

Marini's new facial mask packs even more of a punch with a fistful of peptides and a slew of antioxidant: algae. white and green tea extracts, rooibos and pomegranate. There are also fatty acids and ubquinone (the big deal in Elizabeth Arden's Prevage). My only quibble is that it has every paraben known to man, plus phenoxyethanol. Anyhow, I'll do a full report in a few weeks. Fingers crossed!


Water, kaolin, glycolic acid, sodium glycolate, pichia/resveratrol ferment extract, algae extract, glycerin, butylene glycol, carbomer, polysorbate 20, palmitoyl-pentapeptide-4, sodium hyaluronate, capric/caprylic triglyceride, green tea leaf extract, myristoyl pentapeptide-8, myristoyl tetrapeptide-12, stearic acid, safflower seed oil, glyceryl stearate, polysorbate-60, shea butter, stearyl alcohol, white tea leaf extract, pomegranate extract, roobois tea, linoleic acid, linoleric acid, tocopherol, sunflower seed oil, phenoxyethanol, methyparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben, butylpareben, magnesium aluminum silicate, xanthan gum, myristoyl pentapeptide-11, ubiquinone, PEG-40, hydrogenated castor oil, ceramides-2, sweet almond oil, aloe vera leaf extract, cucumber, arnica, anacylus pyrethrum root extract, tocopheryl acetate, rose hip seed oil.