Now that Jan Marini's Age Intervention Eyelash Conditioner has been yanked from the market (after an earlier formulation of the product was recalled by the FDA last November), victims of stubby lashes are looking for alternatives. Revitalash uses the same key ingredient as Marini's product, prostaglandin, which is a glaucoma drug. So the search continues. A reader tipped me off about Keracyte-B.

Before giving you the lowdown on Keracyte-B, I should point out that the author of the comment, browneyedgirl81, pops up with variations of the same post (although sometimes under a different name) in forums on quite a few websites. Call me cynical, but I am wondering if browneyedgirl81 is working for Keracyte's marketing department.

Whatever. Keracyte-B does seem to be worth looking into and, from what I have been able to discover so far, the ingredients seem harmless enough and it might actually work. So what is Keracyte-B?

Keracyte-B is a hair growth product made by a company called DermaPlus Inc. Keracyte's secret sauce is based on the theory that hair follicles need a boost to elastin in order to grow. Elastin is a protein that surrounds skin and connective tissue - a kind of 'rubber band' that gives skin its elasticity. The idea behind Keracyte is to replenish elastin lost from the scalp.

To do this, Keracyte contains elastatropin, a synthetic version of human elastin. The manufacturer claims the amount of elastratropin in a tube of Keracyte is enough to start replenishing hair on the scalp within a month. Keracyte also uses some of the ingredients used as anti-wrinkle treatments in DermaPlus Inc"s skin treatment, Dermalastyl. The main one is  matrixyl 3000, a synthetic pentapeptide that is supposed to stimulate collagen production.

OK, but can you use it on your eyelashes? So far, I don't see why not. The rest of the ingredient mix appears to be a benign bunch of skin conditioners. It might prove to be good for wrinkly eyelids too.