Kinerase was created in 1999 and was first sold solely to dermatologist and plastic surgeon offices, where physicians recommended it to patients for the care of pre- and post-treatment skin. The company behind it, then called ICN Pharmaceutical, started marketing it in 2003 in its first direct-to-consumer marketing campaign. Now known as Valeant Pharmaceuticals, the company is a global, research-based pharmaceutical company that develops and manufactures a broad range of pharmaceutical products in the areas of dermatology, neurology, and infectious disease.

The main ingredient in Kinerase products is kinetin, a plant-based extract that is supposed to visibly improve the appearance of aging and sun-damaged skin. In plants, kinetin prevents plant leaves from drying out and withering; topically on the skin it is supposed to improve the skin's ability to retain moisture.

The Good:

Kinerase introduces another plant extract called  zeatin – a next generation plant-based extract derived from plant RNA that is proprietary to Valeant. The treatment of Pro+ Therapy is designed to help break topical cosmetic plateaus and take results to the next level. We were also interested with their ingredients, one being bacteria that can retain moisture. The company also has a loyal following of those who have seen positive changes in their appearance.

The Bad:

Independent studies have yet to be conducted to truly win us over. The only study we could find was done by the company themselves. Also, not much information can be found about the ingredients that go into their products.

TIA’s Take:

Claire liked the Kinerase Clear Skin Regulating Mask, which had clay, Canadian willow herb, gylocl methylpropanediol and salicylic acid in it, which she said did a good job of tackling overzealous sebum production. Marta wasn't sure of kinetin's efficacy, and though she first thought she had found an independent study stating it's benefits, it turns out it had been conducted by the makers of kinetin themselves. Marta didn't try the Kinerase Extreme Eye Lift, but she was intrigued by the inclusion of pseudoalteromonas ferment, a strain of bacteria from the Antarctic that may help with the retention of moisture. Though there are some good ingredients in the newer ranges, overall, we are still weary of the huge reliance on the wondrous kinetin, especially with no truly independent findings on its benefits.