Marta may have had mixed results with some of Ojon’s products (the good: Ojon’s Ancient Tribal Conditioner; the bad: their Ultra-Hydrating shampoo), but what I’ve used from their line in the past have all been quite good to my wavy, sometimes frizz-prone, long hair. The only exception has been their Glossing Cream which proved to be a little too rich for me. I’ve since passed it on to my sister-in-law who has thicker, curly hair and says she loves it. Lately, I’ve resorted back to using their Restorative Hair Treatment ($55 for a 4.6 oz) as a bi-weekly ritual when I felt my split ends were getting a bit too much to handle, buying the big tub after a sample worked so well for me.

This hair treatment is specified for smooth dry or damaged hair. It’s an interesting consistency – it’s a solid that you scoop out and rub between your hands to liquify into an oil and massage into your hair and scalp. It has a strong coffee smell which I personally love, but have read reviews where others are not too crazy about it, comparing it to smelling like cigars and even an ash tray!

So what’s in a $55 hair treatment? The main ingredients for this one include elaeis oleifera or American palm oil, which is the bread and butter of this treatment. It’s a rare find outside of its indigenous Central American roots and has the chemical advantages comparable to coconut oil. We also find lecithin, a naturally occurring fat commonly found in egg yolks and tocopherol, a member of the vitamin E family and a lipid-soluble antioxidant that protects cell membranes from. Next up, ascorby palmitate, a fat-soluble vitamin C derivative, and serenoa serrulata, a herbal remedy for a type of hair loss and baldness known as androgenic alopecia, or male- and female-pattern bladness as we noted in our Ookisa hair review. Finally, there’s citric acid and prunus Africana which I’m deducing has been added for fragrance more than anything. It all boils down to basically seven ingredients of what seems to be mostly fats and oils.

Does it work? The short answer is yes, pretty well too. My hair feels softer and stronger than before. However, there are a few things I’m not super crazy about. One is, the application process, especially for someone like me who has hair past my shoulders, is quite time-consuming. And you have to be super careful about how much you apply – as with any hair oil, you don’t want to over do it which leads to more washing out and then overdrying your hair instead of helping it.

The second thing is that the price tag is pretty hefty for a treatment where the main ingredient (elaeis oleifera) has been compared to the much less expensive coconut oil. I’ve used both, and I do think this is a little more heavy duty in softening my hair. It’s also a tad less messy than regular oils. Plus, the bigger 4.6 oz. one does come with a comb if you want to justify the price further. I like to keep it around as my safety blanket when I need to deep condition.

Who is it best for? If you have extremely dry hair, this is a good remedy to invest in. If you have hair that loves the frizzies hair like mine, I say this also carries enough weight to tame them. Just make sure if you do venture out and use it, a little goes a long way so apply it with diligence and you could find yourself sporting healthier locks in no time. But if you have just slightly damaged hair, you could save yourself some big bucks and applying coconut or jojoba oil to your hair the same way to do the trick.

Ingredients

Elaeis Oleifera, Fragrance, Lecithin, Tocopherol, Ascorbyl Palmitate, Citric Acid, Serenoa Serrulata, Prunus Africana.