osmotics cellulite control body glow cc cream

Reviewed by Marta on December 15, 2014

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I am learning to love my legs — which, at just a few weeks short of my 55th birthday, is no mean feat. I even like my knees enough to expose them to the world at large. I even like my thighs (well dislike them less might be more honest). I even like the part where butt and thighs meet. All this leg love is due to embarking on — and sticking with — an exercise routine about 18 months ago and more than a little help from Osmotics Cellulite Control Body Glow CC Cream ($75).

I don’t have an awful lot of cellulite, but there are always stubborn patches on my buttocks and very top of the backs of my thighs. While exercise is the only thing that really conquers cellulite, Osmotics Cellulite Control has lived up to its name and is helping to improve the texture — which, to my eyes, looks less nubbly after six weeks of use.

What I really like about Osmotics Cellulite Control is the way my legs look overall — smoother, tauter and with a very attractive glow. I believe this is largely due to the slow-release self-tanning ingredient that Osmotics included in the formula. Now, I think that adding a self tanner to a cellulite cream is a very intelligent way of enhancing the effects. OK, so it may be a bit of a cheat since it is entirely superficial. But, hey, the subtle glow makes my legs look lovely, and that’s good enough for me.

The self-tanning ingredient in Osmotics Cellulite Control is erythrulose. This is a rather interesting approach, as erythrulose reacts with the amino acids in the first layers of skin (the stratum corneum and epidermis).  The good thing about it — because it is not a stain or a dye — is that it is streak-free. One thing to be aware of is that erythrulose increases the amount of free radical damage caused by sunlight, and so it must be followed by sunscreen. Typically, erythrulose is partnered with another self-tanner called dihydroxyacetone. Since it is possibly carcinogenic, I was relieved not to find it in Cellulite Control.

Along with caffeine, the cellulite beater seems to be a complex called Phytosonic, which is made up of a microalgae and extract of a “sea poppy” that is said be an opiate (perhaps that’s why I’m getting all these waves of well-being). The complex is supposed to work on fatty tissues by “unbinding” them from the epidermis.

Also, here is raspberry ketone, a compound from raspberries that has been touted as a miracle weight loss solution. Despite a Dr. Oz endorsement, there doesn’t seem to be much evidence to back this up. Still, it is unlikely to do much harm. Another ingredient slightly marred by the miracle cure claims is fisetin, a flavenoid from fruits that is said to cure cancer and make you brainier. One thing for sure is that it is an anti-inflammatory.  An interesting ingredient is tetrahydropiperine (THP), which is derived from piperine, the active principle of black peppercorns. It is an antioxidant and penetration enhancer.

While I doubt whether Osmotics Cellulite Control Body Glow CC Cream is going to be the Holy Grail of cellulite solutions (I don’t think there is one), I have seen a subtle impact. And that overall skin smoothing glow it gives me is the reason why I treated myself to a couple of new dresses with hemlines that barely skim the knee.