Prototype#37-C claims to be the “world’s first wrinkle serum with 99% peptide”. There’s nothing wrong with hubris, but there are a few things that worry me about that statement. First, is it even possible for a serum to be almost all peptide actives – what about some kind of base such as water, or a preservative or two. Secondly, all those power peptides such as Matrixyl 3000 or SYN-COLL seem to be backed up by clinical trials in which they are used in very small doses – a couple of percent or even less. By now I was curious, so I emailed the company for the full ingredients list in Prototype#37, heard nothing back and resorted to buying a bottle for around $136.

Not just curious, also a little suspicious. Especially, when the Amazon product listing said: “When compared to other prototypes and industry leading products, including those that contain Botox, Prototype #37-C out performed all of them by average of 257%! ” For a start, this implies Botox is an ingredient that is found in other products. It isn’t, as everyone knows it is a chemical administered by injection by a licensed practitioner.

Well, when my bottle of Prototype#37 arrived I found that all it says on both the bottle and the package is: 50% SYN-COLL (palmitoyl tripeptide-5), 19% acetyl octapeptide-3, 12% acetyl heaxapeptide-8, 12% pentapeptide-3, 5% Matrixyl-3000 (water, glycerin, butylene glycol, carbomer, polysorbate-20, palmitoyl oligopeptide, palmitoyl tetrapeptide-7), 1% Eyseryl (acetyl tetrapeptide-5), 1% hyaluronic acid.

I wrote to the manufacturer of SYN-COLL since it is listed in Prototype#37 at a whopping 50% concentration. The company, DSM Nutritional Products in Switzerland, doesn’t comment on specific products, but did explain to me how its actives would typically be used.

Apparently, SYN-COLL and all other peptide ingredients consist of a solvent (often glycerin, plus water or something similar) and a very small amount of pure, active peptide (usually between 0.01-0.3%). So SYN-COLL is glycerin, water and palmitoyl tripetide-5. And let me repeat in case you missed it the first time, the palmitoyl tripetide-5 is usually between 0.01-0.3%.

Matrixyl also appears to listed in its prediluted form and typically products that contain Matrixyl 3000 would have similarly low concentrations of the active. For some reason, the other three peptides – 19% acetyl octapeptide-3, 12% acetyl heaxapeptide-8, 12% pentapeptide-3 – are listed as if they are pure (not prediluted) and they all come to 43%.

Something doesn’t quite add up.

I did a bit more poking around. The package says that the product is made in Korea by Orovo International.  I found that Orovo seems to have lots of websites that sell things for weightloss or lowering cholesterol. Orovo’s websites were registered on the same US IP address by a company called Hyun Park, which in turn has the same physical address in Korea as on the Prot0ype#37 box.

The Prototype#37 site is also selling something called Cellatox. If you go Cellatox, it will reference another product and so on. One name that pops up frequently is Garrett Devore. According to the Better Business Bureau, who gives Garrett Devore Labs an F rating, Mr Devore is an officer of Devmin Research (maker of Cellatox) and Orovo. This labyrinth of companies and products just keeps on going, but you’ve probably got a headache already.

Like I said, something just doesn’t seem to add up.