Radical Skincare Peptide Infused Antioxidant Serum 1.0 fl oz

How ironic is it that I quit drinking coffee right before I was asked to review Radical Skincare’s Peptide Infused Antioxidant Serum ($190), given that a key ingredient is indeed coffee extract? While both the drinking kind and the antioxidant kind have irrefutable benefits, this product didn’t garner more than a decaffeinated acceptance from me: so close to the real thing but just missing the full rush.

This product’s key differentiator is something I hadn’t heard of before: the apparent loss in efficacy of antioxidants when different ones are mixed together into a cream formulation. Radical Skincare has apparently put its patented Trylacel Technology solution to the test with an assertion of: “300% more potent than leading brands,” but all I could find to back up that claim indicated by a tiny asterisk was a short statement buried in a 33-second video saying: “all results based on USDA lab testing.”

The three parts to this technology (best envisioned via the graphics available at the link above) consist of an antioxidant complex, repair actives, and skin-calming ingredients. While the full ingredients list is posted below, I don’t see anything here that is so different or unusual from other antioxidant and peptide products. For example, a current TIA favorite in the same category, Osmosis Replenish, also combines peptides with a (slightly different) group of antioxidants with skin-soothing ingredients, such as soy instead of Radical Skincare’s sodium hyaluronate — both are common in beauty products though. They both also contain tripetides. To me, however, the Replenish has a clear and noticeable positive impact on my skin that the Radical Skincare product simply lacks.

The experience of using this peptide-infused antioxidant serum was somewhat unusual because of the dark brown color of the cream but overall just fine. The color is initially alarming but does meld into the skin quickly and easily. One of the touted benefits here is an “instant healthy glow,” but even in cloudy Seattle, it wasn’t very noticeable. This product has a very pleasant yet light smell. I had no sensitivity issues and used it before makeup and heavy night moisturizer creams easily.

I wanted to be amazed by this product and kept a watch out in the mirror for notable changes. However, I didn’t see anything that would make me purchase the Radical Beauty Peptide Infused Antioxidant Serum again. Especially not at the $190 price tag and without much evidence of clinical results in general, or even wow results I can personally see.

Coffee isn’t bad for you but since it puts me to sleep, I decided to stop drinking it. I made the same decision with this new product from Radical Skincare. There are better (and cheaper) products out there to get your antioxidant fix.

Ingredients: Aqua (Water), Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Olea Europaea (Olive) Fruit Oil, Caprylic / Capric Triglyceride, Vitis Vinifera (Grape) Fruit Extract, Glycerin, Coffea Arabica (Coffee) Leaf / Seed Extract, Cyclopentasiloxane, Cetearyl Alcohol, Cetyl Alcohol, Stearic Acid, Ceteareth-20, Dimethicone, Simmondsia Chinensis (Jojoba) Seed Oil, Vitis Vinifera (Grape) Seed Extract, Propylene Glycol, Quercetin, Leuconostoc / Radish Root Ferment Filtrate, Tripeptide-10 Citrulline, Tripeptide-1, Phenoxyethanol, Pseudoalteromonas Ferment Extract, Ethoxydiglycol, Pentylene Glycol, Sodium Pca, Urea, Triethanolamine, Allantoin, Hydrolyzed Elastin, Soluble Collagen, Carbomer, Hydroxyethyl Acrylate / Sodium Acryloyldimethyl Taurate Copolymer, Xanthan Gum, Hydrolyzed Wheat Extract, Parfum (Fragrance), Squalane, Hydrolyzed Soy Extract, Tetrasodium Edta, Ethylhexylglycerin, Trehalose, Polyquaternium-51, Tocopheryl Acetate, Potassium Sorbate, Polysorbate 60, Sodium Hyaluronate, Caprylyl Glycol, Butylene Glycol, Sodium Benzoate, Lecithin, Camellia Sinensis Leaf, Ascorbic Acid, Sorbitan Isostearate, Benzyl Salicylate, Butylphenyl Methylpropionate, Hexyl Cinnamal, Hydroxycitronellal, Hydroxyisohexyl 3-Cyclohexene Carboxaldehyde, Limonene, Linalool