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Retrospect Night Renewal- reader reviewed and recommended

Pros

Contains keratin to stimulate collagen production

Cons

Phenoxyethanol
December 7, 2012 Reviewed by TIA Community Member 12 Comments
A luxuriously rich, anti-aging cream that keeps wrinkles at bay

Reviewed by Jeanne

I’m a “certain age,” which means I’m looking for a powerhouse of a night cream to erase the evidence of aging; or at least diminish a few wrinkles, hydrate my skin, and do whatever other wonders possible. Best of all, as a multi-tasking mom, I’d love for all this “repair” to happen while I sleep, meaning less work for me during the day.  Yes, I love beauty products but I also like simple. Two or three lotions that work well without me going crazy remembering what I need to put on first, second and third are fine by me. All of which is a longwinded way of saying I liked Retrospect Night Renewal ($80) for the sheer reason that it does what it says; packing a punch of GOOD against one tough customer — my face!

Not only did it reduce the natural redness that now seems to grace this mug of mine (oh, the perils of getting older), but it felt divine — smooth to the touch and easy to dab on without using too much. According to the literature, “Retrospect Night Renewal is rich in vitamins and plant esters to nourish and repair the skin while you sleep. It reduces redness and rapidly hydrates.” After using it for close to 8 weeks, I’m a happy customer.  It goes on “like buttah” — like dipping your fingers in a vat of pure cream. Added points for its lack of any noticeable scent. It just feels clean, pure, and rich. I also like the packaging, a red jar with a screw top that twists and turns with elegance.

What makes this item different from other night creams is its infusion of keratin, yes, THAT keratin… the one behind all those hair stories. This patented “Replicine Functional Keratin” works with the biological systems of the skin to stimulate cell growth and encourage the right kind of collagen production. While ideally the company wants you to use all their products, there is a whole “system” at play here with a microdermabrasion cream, protein surge gel cleanser and more. I’m here to tell you this one cream (at least at night) is definitely a winner. After two months of testing it, my skin felt renewed and fresh, with my wrinkles kept at bay and a noticeable sense of my skin feeling “alive” and well and ready to take on another multi-tasking day.

Ingredients: Water , Ethylhexyl Olivate, Oxidized Keratin, Glycerin, Ethylhexyl Palmitate, Sorbitan Olivate, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Dimethicone, Cetearyl Olivate, Cetyl Palmitate, Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea) Butter, Retinyl Palmitate, Sorbitan Palmitate, Linoleic Acid, Cyclopentasiloxane, Linolenic Acid, Stearic Acid, Tocopherol, Panthenol, Sodium Hyaluronate, Dimethicone Crosspolymer, Sodium Polyacrylate, Sodium Sorbate, Tetrasodium EDTA, Phenoxyethanol, Ethylhexylglycerin

Also says on package: Retrospect Night Renewal does not contain parabens, sulfates, synthetic colors or fragrances, GMOs, phthalates, Triclosan or mineral oils.

  • March 8, 2017

    by vincent

    come on people,you should only be using products with pure ingreidents """a overinflated price tag a nice package and stuff in there you cant even pronounce,,yes they have done some medical research on keritan ''thats all well and good but you would be a whole lot better off taking your 80 bucks and buying two containers of dr.axe multiple collagen protien ,roughly 38 dollars each with discount ,,overall youll feel better and make much better use of your money,"""""

  • January 12, 2013

    by RobK

    Oxidized keratin is used in this university of miami study showing increase in collagen 4 and 7 production by skin cells.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22621188.
    it is also used in this study showing faster wound healing and more robust skin of children with a bilstering skin disorder http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22914035.
    The way it works on skin is very different to the way it works on hair, one is helping the biology of the live cells in skin, the other is rebuilding the structure of cells in hair. The unique method of making the oxidized keratin makes it different to the standard hydrolyzed keratin used in inexpensive shampoos. It means it is more like the body's own keratin than anything else, and so can work with the body in a way no other keratin can. The trade brand across the wound care, skin care and hair care products that contain the technology is Replicine Functional Keratin.

  • December 18, 2012

    by Kendall

    Dennis,
    The "old keratin" is the hydrolyzed keratin which is in a lot of hair products. This is functional keratin (oxidized). I found a lot of info at Keraplast.com and keratinquestions.com about the differences.
    Julie, according to my research both your hair and your skin are 80 to 90% keratin so your hair and skin are very much alike from a molecular make up.

  • December 18, 2012

    by Dennis

    Retrospects site informs me it is a "skin identical" ingredient. I have heard a lot about these ingredients, specifically on Paula Begoun's site. http://www.paulaschoice.com/cosmetic-ingredient-dictionary/definition/skin-identical-ingredients.

    I also looked at the NCBI study, which i found encouraging, linked to a Keratin-based hydrogel study in would healing. Is this the same? What's the difference between regular old Keratin found in many inexpensive shampoos and the oxidized keratin in retrospect? And more importantly, does it justify the price tag, especially when you consider the rest of the ingredients?

  • December 18, 2012

    by Julie Kay

    I'm going to jump in here because yesterday I did some research and found that function keratin is used quite typically in hair products; both expensive and economical (eg. Suave). It's basic function is it's ability to pierce the hair shaft and thus begin to heal any structural damage. Although it listed skin care as a "useage" for functional keratin, I couldn't find a single product.

    Now me, myself, instead of being impressed by Retrospect boasting this ingredient and basing this product around it... me- I ask why I should be impressed? My skin isn't anything like my hair.

    Again, my opinion only. But I dislike gimmicks. ~jk

  • December 17, 2012

    by Kendall

    Dennis,
    Go to retrospectusa.com and look under science tab. Also at keraplast.com. I think this is a medical wound healing company that has done tons of testing in the medical world and as I understand hold the only patents for Functional Keratin as opposed to the common hydrolyzed keratin. They are now going into skin care and wrinkle reduction by stimulating the body to produce collegen 4 and 7.

  • December 17, 2012

    by Marta

    Hi Dennis, I gave a bit of information on functional keratin in my Retrospect eye gel review. It is based on the company's claims and is not independently verified, but it certainly looks interesting: http://www.truthinaging.com/eyes/retrospect-flash-firm-eye-gel-reviewed-and-recommended

  • December 17, 2012

    by Dennis

    Fair enough, Kendall. But what does it do? I can't find anything on it other than that it's a skin conditioner. Could you perhaps link me to some information on it?

  • December 16, 2012

    by Kendall

    Dennis,
    Please tell me one other skin care product that contains Oxidized Keratin from the drug store or anywhere else. I am not asking about the common hydrolyzed keratin but functional oxidized keratin.

  • December 7, 2012

    by Dennis

    Not to sound like a curmudgeon, but the ingredients list reads like that of something you can pick up at Walgreens for $8. I guess the price tag is for the packaging.

  • December 7, 2012

    by Julie Kay

    For a moment contemplate this site's name: Truth in Aging. Then revisit your opening statement "I'm of an age..." I'm sorry, but here being coy just annoys me. Immediately I dropped to the ingredients of this product instead of reading your review. I was looking for clues as to whether this product would ring any bells for me, at 61, as a night cream. It did not. I'm not into guessing games, but I do like knowing the facts in these reviews. I won't even try to guess the age skin you have that's satisfied by this cream. Babe: Seriously, there's no reason to keep this important information out. It's salient to the issue at hand. Reversing gears- I did read your review and am happy to hear how happy you are with this cream. It's fun to try new things; better yet to find ones that work! ~jk

  • December 7, 2012

    by Holly

    Thanks for taking the time to review this Jeanne. So glad you liked it!

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