Danny recently sent me a stash of Sarah Chapman cosmetics, a cult brand in the UK that is completely new to me. Sarah Chapman is a London-based esthetician (or facialist as the Brits would say) and has a salon called Skinesis in Chelsea. I have been testing her eye cream and will write my review towards the end of the month. I must say that I am liking it so far and am so impressed by the long ingredients list that it seemed worth posting a heads up and highlighting a few of them.

Sure there are a few things not to like in Sarah Chapman Skinesis Eye Recovery ($84) and you purists out there will not be enamored by the silicones, polymers, harsh preservatives and even retinyl palmitate, in the light of recent research. However, the good does seem to outweigh the bad. For a start this is packed with peptides

Amongst them is Syn-ake (dipeptide diaminobutyroyl benzylamide diacetate) is the most dominant and is one of those muscle movement inhibitors. This isn’t really my favorite peptide as I tend to prefer ones that encourage things rather than inhibit them, so I was pleased to see collagen building Matrixyl 3000 (palmitoyl tetrapeptide-7 and palmitoyl oligopeptide). Supposedly even better than Matrixyl is Syn-Coll, which is palmitoyl tripeptide-3. There is also dipeptide-2, which animal studies suggest may act as a growth promoter because of its ability to increase the skin’s protein synthesis and amino acid uptake.

Another important ingredient and very much at the cutting edge is teprenone (also in an eye cream by Osmotics). It also goes by the name of Renovage and may stabilize our telomeres and thereby help our cells renew themselves.

Sarah Chapman’s eye cream seems to have been formulated with dark under eye circles in mind (not something I am afflicted with). Skin whitening/brightening ingredients include the magic mushroom, tricholoma matsutake singer extract, and hexylresorcinol, of which a .5% concentration has proven to be just as effective as 2% concentration of hydroquinone. Hespiridin methyl chalcone is meant to lessen blood flowing though capillaries close to the surface of the skin, which potentially means less dark bluish discoloration under the eyes.

There a few interesting botanicals as well. Plantago lanceolata extract is an anti-inflammatory, but without much research to back it up and some evidence that it can cause allergic reactions.

As I mentioned at the beginning, I am enjoying Sarah Chapman Skinesis Eye Recovery so far and I’ll report back in a few weeks on how it actually performs for me.


Aqua, glycerin, cetearyl olivate, dipeptide diaminobutyroyl benzylamide diacetate, isopropyl palmitate, sorbitan olivate, phenyl trimethicone, palmitoyl tripeptide-3, caprylic/capric triglyceride, cetyl alcohol, dimethicone, tetrahexyldecyl ascorbate, sodium haluronate, crosspolymer, plantago lanceolata extract, crithmum maritimum extract, butylene glycol, palmitoyl pentapeptide-4, teprenone, hespiridin methyl chalcone, dipeptide-2, palmitoyl tetrapeptide-7, palmitoyl oligopeptide, chrysin, hydoxysuccinmide, glyceryl stearate, peg-100 stearate, cetearyl alcohol, dicetyl phosphate, ceteth-10 phosphate, acetyl tyrosine, proline, hydrolyzed vegetable protein, adenosine triphosphate, ethylhexyl palmitate, silica dimethyl silylate, hyaluronic acid, bismuth oxychloride, cyclopentasiloxane, hexylresorcinol, ppg-12/smdi copolymer, triethanolamine, phenoxyethanol, caprylyl glycol, ethylhexylglycerin, hexylene glycol, saccharide isomerate, xanthan gum, dimethyl MEA, stearyl glycyrrhizate, retinyl palmitate, thioctic acid, carnosine, ubiquinone, tacopheryl acetate, tricholoma mastutake singer extract, santalum album extract, phellodendron amurense extract, hordeum distichon extract, mica, titanium dioxide, iris florentina extract, jasminum officinale extract, lilium candidum extract, dipotassium glycyrrhizate, aloe barbadensis, hydroxydecyl ubiquinone, peg-8, tocopherol, ascorbyl palmitate, ascorbic acid, citric acid, disodium edta