It's going to be difficult to beat YBF Correct's eye cream in terms of efficacy, and this one doesn't... but it does work. Just don't expect to see the same immediate results that you would with YBF, especially the dramatic reduction (for me, at least) in under-eye bags and puffiness. What Sircuit Skin's formula does do is noticeably brighten your under-eye area, whiting-out over time those stubborn shadows that plague so many of us when we look in the mirror. I started noticing a reduction in one week.

White Out is jammed pack full of all kinds of acids, heading up the list are the fatty kinds: tetradecanoic fatty acid (From nutmeg) and octadecanoic fatty acid. Both act as emulsifiers and moisturizers, the former of which also finds its way into the revered YBF correct eye cream.

While not in the YBF formula, Sircuit Skin also employs L-alpha-arbutin, another common ingredient used in eye care creams for its lightening properties. Alpha-arbutin works by inhibiting the enzyme tyrosine, which is responsible for the staining effects of pooled blood under the eyes. In particular, this ingredient is a super form of arbutin, which is found in bearberry plants and is popular in Japan. It is much more powerful than beta arbutin - ten times more, in fact and, therefore, only small amounts are needed. It has been tested on 80 women of Chinese descent with better results than kojic acid, hyroquinone and beta arbutin.

I was surprised to see witch hazel in an eye care cream since it is more commonly used for its astringing effects in acne formulas. However, the high amount of tannins present in witch hazel make it an effective choice for dealing with leaky blood vessels under the eyes. The astringent property, plus added anti-inflammatory effects, help treat under eye circles by contracting or shrinking the surrounding tissues, thus impeding the blood flow. Perhaps we'll see more of this in other eye creams...?

Now, back to the acids: Lactic acid (milk), malic acid (unripened apples), and tartaric acid (grapes), are all alpha hydroxy acids with proven skin-rejeuvenating properties that increase exfoliation and have a positive effect on the skin’s ability to hold moisture. What’s more, they improve the appearance of fine wrinkles, irregular pigmentation and rough skin texture.

Rosewood oil is another rejuvenator, purportedly at least. I haven't seen any clinical trials pop up yet, but the circumstantial evidence holds that it has excellent cell stimulant and tissue regeneration properties, making it a nice addition. By strengthening the connective tissue around the eyes, it makes sense that it would have a lightening effect.

The antioxidant vitamin D, the soothing, healing calendula extract, plus the calming bisabolol (from chamomile) contribute to the formula's moisturizing capabilities and in turn assist in strengthening capillaries in much the same way as the rosewood oil does.

Also nice for moisture is the inclusion of D-glucuronic acid, which is the chirally correct form of hyaluronic acid. As written about earlier, Sircuit Skin is all about Chiral Technology, where only the left side of a molecule is used making it much more stable and easier for your skin to absorb than its non-chiral counterpart. This version of hyaluronic acid has a smaller molecular size that is able to reach deep down into the dermis layer of your skin to maintain and attract moisture. In fact, it is able to hold 1000 times its weight in water, as well as aiding the absorption of other key nutrients found in the formula.

For good measure, Sircuit Skin throws in titanium dioxide, a sun block mineral with anti-bacterial and anti-viral activity.

All of the above sounds good, right? Well, add to that fullersomes (aka fullerenes), which are more effective nutrient carriers than lipsomes and nanosomes (thanks to being up to 10 million times smaller), and can we say that a good deal has just been made great? Um, no. There's a bit of controversy to this last ingredient that is worth exploring. As Marta has written about earlier, some studies have revealed that fullerenes cause oxidative stress and as such many products have been reformulated with out them.

Sircuit Skin's White Out is an effective under-eye lightener because it works nicely to promote better circulation and healthier capillaries in the surrounding skin. It's also a nice moisturizers, and lends some degree of sun protection with the titanium dioxide. However, the addition of fullersome makes the formula just a wee bit suspect in my book. But would I continue to use it? Yes. I like using it in the morning, keeping my YBF for night, which is much more heavy and has a tendency to gunk up in globs over time. It's a nice little routine I got going on, the other component of which is Garnier's eye toll-on stick, which is enriched with caffeine. I use that one throughout the day for touch ups and will be reviewing it later. I'm not so sure how or if it is working just yet, but I thought I'd give it a try. After all, us haggardly grad students need all the help we can get!

Ingredients:

Distilled water (aqua), tetradecanoic fatty acid, octadecanoic fatty acid, glycol distearate, lecithin, cetyl alcohol, cetearyl alcohol, polysorbate, glycerin, titanium dioxide, L-arbutin, L-malic acid, L-tartaric acid, D-glucuronic acid, L-alpha-bisabolol, vitamin D (D-alpha-tocopherol), witch hazel (hamamelis virginiana) extract, calendula (calendula officinalis) essential oil, rosewood (aniba rosaeodora) essential oil, benzyl alcohol, sodium hydroxymethylglycinate, fullersomes.