Vitamin C is important for your skin. Not only does it help eliminate free radicals, but it also helps with the production of collagen and hyper-pigmentation control. What's more, it's a must-needed ingredient in any gal's beauty routine who has exposed her skin to any number of toxins from cigarette smoking or environmental pollution. I've been using Ole Henriksen's Truth Serum for the past few months, but have recently put it to rest to try out Sircuit Skin's Sircuit Weapon 10% Vitamin C Therapy Serum (which has a lot of good, and nothing bad in it).

And I like it about as equally as I like the Truth Serum (if not more), but for different reasons.

Both serums have some things in common: like the super-moisturizer sodium hyaluronate and then the brightening citrus extracts. Some quick notes about sodium hyaluronate (which you can read more about here): Its small molecular size is able to reach deep down into the dermis layer of your skin to maintain and attract moisture. In fact, it is able to hold 1000 times its weight in water, as well as aiding the absorption of other key nutrients found in the formula.

Both serums also claim to have vitamin C concentrations at or exceeding 10%, but that's where the similarities end. Henriksen's serum uses two different types of vitamin C--magnesium ascorbyl phosphate and sodium ascorbyl phosphate. Where as Sircuit Skin uses the more common L-Ascorbic acid.

As you can read in Marta's post here, L-ascorbic acid is one of the more "useless" forms of vitamin C since it is fairly unstable, which brings it down a notch when you compare it what the Truth serum uses.

However, I'm not sure if that's the case here with this particular formula. There are two important characteristics about this version of vitamin C that sircuit skin uses. Firstly, it is chirally correct--meaning that it only uses the left side of the molecule, which makes it much more stable and easier for your skin to absorb than its non-chiral counterpart. (For more information about Sircuit Skin's Chiral Technology, click here.)

Secondly, the L-Ascorbic acid is one component of the serum’s 10% L-Ascorbic Acid/Wine Phytoalexin Complex, a potent, anti-aging antioxidant formation that includes the wondrous resveratrol and potent polydatin, both of which which are grape Phytoalexins found in red wine. Phytoalexins help spare the skin from oxidative stress and increase collagen production, and when combined with the L-Ascorbic Acid help to deliver an active hydra-stabilized form of Vitamin-C.

Ole Henriksen's Truth Serum, on the other hand, includes green tea extract, another important antioxidant that works well with vitamin C. Although different, both formulas will work well for your skin.

In addition to the sodium hyaluronate, Sircuit Weapon includes cassia beta glucan extract, L-sodium PCA and squalene for an intensely hydrating and moisturizing experience. Black currant oil is a nice emollient as well and an antioxidant to boot.

Also included is the soothing, astringing witch hazel extract, along with several interesting amino acids: D-proline and L-glutathione.

D-proline is an important amino acid that can typically be found in energy drinks. Obviously it works a bit different when applied to the skin. Here, D-proline helps strengthen the cell envelope and skin, and is involved in the body's production of collagen and cartilage.

L-glutathione, which can be found in vegetables such as avocado, potato, spinach, okra, acorn squash and asparagus, works in DNA synthesis and repair, protein and prostaglandin synthesis, and amino acid transport. What's more, it assists in the metabolism of carcinogens and toxins, all-the-while helping to maintain the functions and efficacy of other antioxidants in the formula. Aside, L-glutathione deficiencies can often be seen in many age-related degenerative diseases, so perhaps you can connect the dots to its anti-aging claims.

On a final note, I think it's worth mentioning the feel and application of the two serums. Ole Henriksen's serum is much more light-weight, and easy to apply. It has an Astro-glidey like texture that absorbs easily into your face that comes with a nice citrusy smell. Sircuit Weapon is much more concentrated. I've been applying two droplets of the stuff every other day, since the directions suggest working up to daily application. In my mind this makes me think the the Sircuit Weapon is much more potent than the truth serum.

When I apply it to my face, I notice a definite tightening of the pores and my skin looks brighter for hours afterwards. And, in the two weeks since I've been using, I must say that the texture and tone of my skin has improved remarkably since switching over. While I prefer the way the truth serum feels, I think I'm seeing more bang for the buck from Sircuit Weapon. However, it's a good deal more expensive so I'm not sure if I'm going to be making a permanent move. Nevertheless, it gets my full recommendation--it's a great serum.



Hamamelis Virginiana (Witch Hazel) Water, Aqua (Water), L-Ascorbic Acid, Cassia Angustifolia Seed Polysaccharide, Glycerin, L-Proline, L-Sodium Lactate, L-Sodium PCA, L-Sodium Hyaluronate, Wine Extract, Resveratrol, Squalene, Ribes Nigrum (Black Currant) Seed Oil, Xanthan Gum, L-Glutathione, Citrus Reticulata (Tangerine) Leaf Oil, Citris Paradisi (Grapefruit) Oil, Benzyl Alcohol.

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