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Sirius Aurora LED Light Therapy System- reader reviewed and recommended

Reviewed by Emily May 9, 2011 62 Comments

Save 15% on the Ultra Renew Plus with three LED lights, ultrasonic and galvanic. Use the coupon code PLUS15

See our post: Tool up with the best at home device for you

It has certainly generated a lot of comments on TIA over the past two months, so I thought I’d share my experiences with the Sirius Aurora LED Light Therapy System ($149) with the community.  To say I was enthused by Marta’s initial post on the Aurora on March 3 is an understatement—I actually was the very first to comment (with the question, when will it be available on the TIA shop?).  So you can take that to mean either (1) this product really got my attention or (2) I seriously need to get a life.   Or both.

So when indeed the Aurora became available the following week, I promptly placed my order.   I loved the idea of LED and the fact that this product supported multiple light frequencies—and at an incredible price point.  My idea was to use it every night, alternating evenings between the red light to combat wrinkles and aging, and the green, to deal with skin tone and spots.  (I don’t have acne, though come summer I might give the blue light a try if I feel breakouts coming on.)  And I have been faithful to that plan:  it’s been almost seven weeks since I started this regime (46 evenings, actually) and I am either proud or embarrassed to say I’ve only skipped two nights.  (See above—as in, get a life.)  So that’s 23 sessions a piece with each mode.  The results have been positive, and in ways that have surprised me a bit as well.

By background, I’m 55, and acutely aware of everything that comes with that.  My face shows signs of aging and sagging, and I’m concerned especially about “marionette” lines, lines around the mouth, crow’s feet and under-eye crinkling, and most disturbingly a couple of horizontal lines that have taken up residency across the forehead.  I also have some freckling and hyperpigmentation spots.  I’m assured that none of this is particularly bad or pronounced for my age—but that is never a consolation, as TIA readers probably know.  And at another stage (and in another economy) I was a regular at the dermatologist’s office, and was very pleased the results of glycolic peels and microdermabrasion for pigmentation, wrinkles, and overall brightness and tone.  I got those treatments pretty consistently throughout my forties.  And about five years ago (I’m mentioning this thinking of Copley’s post on March 25 on pre-wedding treatments, which referred to this) I had two IPL sessions, which were extremely effective on pigmentation and dark spots.  All of that was fantastic, and probably kept some of the aging demons at bay, but all of it very expensive.

So I turned to the Aurora as an adjunct to what has become a diligent program of serums, creams, and cleansers from the TIA hit parade.  The first challenge was figuring out what to do with the thing—as several commenters have noted, Sirius doesn’t include instructions in the box, though they are pretty clear on the website.  Basically, each area to be treated gets three minutes of attention in the “pulse” mode, followed by three in the steady light mode.  The site instructs you to begin with three minutes of pulsed light on each of three face sections—segmented horizontally—and an additional three minutes apiece of continuous light on each of five areas (dividing the cheeks and forehead into two).  My plan was also to put the Aurora to use on my hands and neck/décolleté.

This turns out to be a big commitment; in the end I’ve been doing nine minutes on the face (in three sections) in pulse mode, and then 12 (not 15) in continuous mode—I found I couldn’t really address five separate different sections and settled on four.   Then three minutes pulse, three minutes steady, on the back of each hand, and on the neck.  A total of 39 minutes!  Generally I did this while watching the latest from the “Real Housewives,” which of course makes time fly, but it was a bit of a bore when squinting or closing my eyes whenever the device—which Marta points out has a rather large, oval-shaped working surface—was nearby.  (Which is a lot of the time, and raises the question debated in several reader comments about the use of goggles with the Aurora.   I have probably been less than prudent in exposing my eyes, particularly because I have used the green light directly on my eyelids, which have a couple of pronounced freckles.  It would be great if the TIA community could get some definitive guidance from Sirius about how to manage eye exposure).

In using the Aurora with the green light, I simply applied it to freshly-cleansed skin.  For the red light, I first slathered on a vitamin C serum or YBF antioxidants.  And in addition to the usual assortment of eye creams and moisturizers, I also used La Vie Celeste Glycolic mask about once a week, and the divine YBF Prep twice weekly.

And after all that – the results?  Better than I expected, if less than miraculous.   Use of the red light seems to have improved skin appearance and firmness, with some marginal, but real, impact on those wrinkles, especially around the eyes.  The surprise was the green light.  I can report definite and noticeable effects on the freckles and pigmentation.  The tops of my hands, in particular, are significantly improved.  A half-dozen big freckles have partially faded, and a constellation of lighter, larger splotches are now, depending on the light, nearly invisible.   On my face, the overall pigment is more consistent, a couple of freckles are less pronounced, and an area of discoloration I’ve had forever—sort of a light, dime-sized area near my jaw line—has faded noticeably.   In fact, when I saw a cousin (whose known me forever) a couple of weeks ago on the way to getting a haircut—without any makeup on at all—she actually commented on how even my skin tone appeared.  Without a leading question.

These results have really impressed me.  IPL provided a more dramatic and immediate effect on pigmentation, and I would still recommend it for those looking for an intensive treatment and with money to, well, burn. But at $150, the Aurora has delivered excellent results, and I’ll keep using it.  I’ll probably go into a more routine mode of a few times a week, focusing on particular problem areas, and using both the red and green lights.

My only concern, which I’m confident can be addressed, is the performance of the Aurora unit. Mine seems to have an unpredictable tendency to turn itself off for no apparent reason.  At first I thought this was due to the placement of the controls—perhaps I inadvertently hit the power button as I grasped the Aurora handle.  But I don’t think that was the problem. It’s annoying since the device is programmed to “beep” at three-minute intervals, so when it quits unexpectedly, I needed to recalculate the time. I haven’t been able to figure out what prompts these sudden shutdowns, and I imagine it’s an issue the manufacturer is addressing.  I’ve been in touch with Marta, who has told me that a small number of Aurora buyers have reported a problem, and that Sirius has been great about replacing their products.  I think I do need to swap mine, but swap it I will.  I’m hoping to see continued positive effects from the Aurora.

The Sirius Aurora is now available in the TIA shop with complimentary samples of Your Best Face Antioxidants Concentrate and Hydrate B Concentrate.

See our post: Tool up with the best at home device for you

[Editor’s note: Also check out Truth in Aging’s own Ultra Renew Ultrasonic/LED device!]

  • April 21, 2014

    by Vicky

    After less than two weeks using the Aurora, it began shutting down after a few seconds. I was using mostly the blue light, and after a couple of days i decided to try the other lights, and I did not have that problem. It seems like the blue light is not making proper contact, I try to apply pressure to it and it stays on longer - sometimes through the entire treatment. I contacted Sirius through their website but never got a reply.

  • October 19, 2013

    by Karen Springer

    I just received this product and have only used it once with only the blue cover. My Aurora did turn off on it's own as well. My question is this, I noticed the product will last up to 10,000 hours. I am wondering if I will have to buy another one at that time?

  • May 20, 2013

    by letty

    I Can use red and blue but for how many minutes, if I want to use the 3 light how Can I beggin. Please help thank you.

  • April 23, 2013

    by Renita

    I might be late with this, but Groupon has a deal on the Sirius Aurora LED light therapy system for $79.99. The info and reviews were very helpful. I think I'm going to snatch this deal up. Offer ends April 24, 2013.

  • March 24, 2013

    by Jennifer

    Did anyone notice an increase in pore size after a few days of use? I used the green specifically to reduce hyperpigmentation and have noticed an increase in pore size in the specific areas I applied it to.

  • February 8, 2013

    by Marta

    We know that the Sirius is 660nm & 880nm for Red & Infrared, 415nm for Blue, and 525nm for the Green light. Lightstim does not offer that information (at least I can't find it). However, it is FDA cleared.

  • February 7, 2013

    by Janet ODell

    I was just about to ask the same question, Ann. I was getting ready to order a LightStim and then saw this product here.

    Does anyone know how the two compare?

    Thanks in advance.

  • February 7, 2013

    by Ann Korach

    How does this compare to the Lightstim product in terms of efficacy ?

  • January 5, 2013

    by Susanne

    Hello,

    I've been reading about the Sirius Aurora and was wondering, if the people who are using it would still recommend the product.
    I'd be mainly using it for wrinkles and age spots.
    Is it worth purchasing, or do most people give up on using it, because of the time commitment.
    Are there any known side effects, apart from the ones mentioned with the blue light?

    Thanks,
    Susanne

  • July 17, 2012

    by Gail

    Thanks, Marta!

  • July 17, 2012

    by Marta

    Hi Gail, thank you the tip. We'll get one it to test! I love Sevani too and am always on the look out for a new sunscreen.

  • July 17, 2012

    by Gail

    Oops! The comment about Sevani sunscreen was a general comment. Didn't mean for it to show up with the Light Therapy System posts. Apologies!

  • July 17, 2012

    by Gail

    Marta, any chance TIA might start offering the Sevani Daily Mineral Age Defense sunscreen? It's an excellent product, and the texture seems slightly whipped, so a little goes a long way. It leaves a nice glow--always a plus with sunscreen. I sometimes don't wear anything at all over it, and I've received many compliments about my skin while wearing it. I don't mean to sound like an ad, but I really like Sevani products. and this sunscreen is a big favorite. Thanks!

  • July 14, 2012

    by Marta

    Hi Ellen, I believe that LED is contraindicated for hyperactive thyroid conditions because the condition can result in increased sensitivity to light. I think that ultrasonic is OK. But I would urge you to check with your physician before using the device in ultrasonic mode on your neck.

  • July 14, 2012

    by Ellen

    I just purchased the Ultra Renew. I would like clarification on hyperthyroid. I read that I cannot use the LED in the thyroid area. Can I use the Ultrasound? I have Graves Disease and am in remission...with occasional flare ups.
    Thank you all so much.
    I am excited to try this device.

  • July 8, 2012

    by Marta

    Hi John, I would suggest red then green.

  • July 8, 2012

    by John

    What colors should I be using for post acne hyperpigmentation? back to back green? Blue then green? Red then green?

  • June 30, 2012

    by Terry

    I just bought a Sirius Aurora and I wonder if it has any effect on nerves. I had my wisdom tooth removed and it has left me with a rather numb gum on one side of the face. How about black heads?

  • June 21, 2012

    by Marta

    Janice, I am very sorry to hear this. I am copying this over to our customer care and they will help you get in touch with someone at Sirius.

  • June 20, 2012

    by Janice

    Marta,

    I bought a Sirius Aurora from TIA back in February and it quit working after not even 4 weeks. I contacted Sirius regarding the problem and they described what to do as noted above. Needless to say, it didn't work, so they requested I sent the unit back to them directly (with tracking) and they would replace the unit once they received it.

    To make a long story short(er), I haven't received my replacement. It's been well over a month. I've emailed them and tried calling them, all to no avail. The only thing they said was that it was sent via USPS First Class (no tracking) as it was cost prohibitive to send it any other way... I live in Canada - I was told to send it "insured with tracking" and they sent it back with no tracking whatsoever?? I wish someone would have told me this before it (supposedly) was mailed out!

    Could you please (PLEASE) give me a contact name/number/email of someone there that will show a bit more interest and perhaps hopefully help me resolve this? I would certainly appreciate it as I just don't know what else to do...

  • May 9, 2012

    by Ilse

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004BAWW0G/ref=ox_sc_act_title_9?ie=UTF8&m=AQDQQ7J3L4J1A

    Seems to be the same thing, does anybody know? Cheaper than the Sirius :o)

  • April 14, 2012

    by Marta

    Hi Kathie, LED is safe for sensitive skin. You need to find the right level, distance from face, duration that suits you. But a 10-15 minute session should leave you with no more than a slightly reddish complexion that should be back to normal with half an hour.

  • April 13, 2012

    by Kathie

    I seen so many goo reviews on this product but I'm a little sketchy about buying this product. The fact is i have very sensitive skin/eczema and i want to purchase it on my acne prone skin? Do you think it's a good idea to use LED light on sensitive skin?

  • April 12, 2012

    by Marta

    Hello Paula
    A few of the devices have an issue that simply requires the contact to be cleaned. After making sure that the device is turned off and completely unplugged, take off the LED panel. Moisten a Q-tip with rubbing alcohol, and apply it to the two metallic pins on the device AND the two metallic conduction pads on the LED panel that come into contact with the pins when the panel is snapped into place (please make sure NOT to get any alcohol on the circuitboard that is located on the panel in the middle between the two pads). Leave the device and the panel there for half an hour or so, then snap the panel back into place, plug in the device and turn it on.

    If that doesn't work please contact our customer service at orders@truthinaging.com and we will get you a replacement. Thank you

  • April 11, 2012

    by Paula Cohen

    I purchased the Sirius Aurora Light Therapy System in December from Truth in Aging Used it regularly as recommended, and this week it just stopped working - as if the battery were dead-though it is plugged in & can't connect with anyone at the Company for advice.
    Very strange and disappointing!

  • February 17, 2012

    by Marta

    Cherie, red light is good for rosacea. Blue is generally for acne control.

  • February 16, 2012

    by Cherie Barstow

    I forgot to mention I have slight rosacea too and I believe the blue light is better for that, right?

  • February 16, 2012

    by Cherie Barstow

    Hi Marta!
    Thanks for the reply, and the interesting article. :) Watch for an order from me sometime tonight as I'm going to go ahead and take the plunge. woohoo!

    I'll probably work primarily with the red and blue lights. I am 42 but still have oily skin, somewhat larger pores on my nose, and always break out during my monthly cycle so I think the blue will be useful to me in addition to the red. And yes, though I don't have a whole lot of wrinkles just yet, I am getting crows feet around my eyes, and I can just see the overall drop in my face over the last 10 years. I want my super high cheekbones back! LOL

    Anyway, thanks again for all the useful info on your site. I had read your review on this device too, and all the replies on that thread and am really pretty excited to get started.

  • February 16, 2012

    by Marta

    Welcome Colette, I think the green light will be helpful for maintaining your post IPL results. I do think it is a good idea to use antioxidants at the same time as the Aurora as it has a short-term pro-oxidant effect. The YBF Private Reserve oil is a great choice as it gives some 'slip' when using the device and, more importantly, has a high concentration of two powerful antioxidants. Having said that, if funds and a desire for simplicity mean that you are gravitating towards some essentials from the La Vie Celeste line, you'll be making a great choice. There are antioxidants in LVC that will be useful with your LED light as well.

  • February 16, 2012

    by Colette

    Hi...new to the site and I'm hooked! This Aurora light intrigued me. I just had an IPL treatment for hyperpigmentation due to acne medication(adult onset acne at 42. I am 50) and I'm looking into what to go forward with to keep up with the results. I have one more IPL next month (Groupon made it a no brainer to try it out). I am interested in the La Vie line as I need to revamp all my skin care, with the Aurora as a wonderful addition to keep the dark spots under control. Can someone clarify what to use with the light? I've seen C serum and antioxidant serum--I'd like to try the YBF antioxidant oil but with all the expenditures it may be a bit out of my range at this point I'm afraid.
    As a newbie I would appreciate any and all advice! Thank you in advance!

  • February 15, 2012

    by Marta

    Hello Cherie, the Aurora is not a laser, it is an LED light. While I don't think it would interfere with the healing process - and may even speed it up - the device can be easily directed away from your nose. Here's some more information on LED and healing: http://www.wired.com/medtech/health/news/2003/10/60786

  • February 15, 2012

    by Jenny

    I am planning on working my way up to the Sirius Aurora, but in the meantime I simply could not pass up the Evis Beauty MD LED Red that I found on clearance for $39 (!) at Marshalls. Any suggestions on the best type of tanning goggles to use? I'm worried that some of them just block UV rays and may not be dark enough to block out that crazy BRIGHT light.

  • February 15, 2012

    by Cherie Barstow

    Hi All!
    After reading all the good reviews at this forum, I'm ready to take the plunge and buy the Sirius Aurora. My question relates to how--if at all--it might react with my nostril piercing. My nostril was pierced 2 months ago and thus is still in the "healing" stage since such cartilage piercings generally take between 6-12 months to heal completely. So I'm wondering if anyone knows if I'd have to avoid the use of the laser around this area if it might be detrimental to the healing process in any way? On the other hand, perhaps it might even be beneficial?? I don't know... a Google search didn't turn up much unfortunately.

    Thanks in advance for any info you can provide.

  • January 25, 2012

    by JustD

    Spo, thanks for the info on the thyroid issue. I had tests last year and they said that I was within range, whatever that means, but the hypothyroid symptoms I am experiencing all speak for themselves. Regardless, it's great to know not to use the LED on the neck if you are hyper* or do have an overactive thyroid...because who knew? That's not even a question I would've thought to ask at all. Great info! Thanks so much for sharing.

  • January 24, 2012

    by Marta

    Hi Eryn, the goggles should be used with all the lights if used near the eyes. For stretch marks, the red light is the one that should be used.

  • January 24, 2012

    by Eryn

    Just to clarify - Are the tanning goggles recommended for all three LED light colours? Or just specifically with the use of the Blue light?

    I'm also trying to find information specific to the use of the LED lights on stretch marks & if it's the Green or Red light that would help. Anyone run across any information?

  • December 18, 2011

    by spo

    Thank you, Marta - my pleasure really! Love to help out my favorite community of sisters ;-)

  • December 18, 2011

    by Marta

    Spo thanks so much for helping Asya with your experience and your husband's - two for the price of one, like the Clintons :) Seriously, that's useful information as I do get asked the hyperthyroid question from time to time and I'm very pleased to hear that LED is working for you.

  • December 18, 2011

    by spo

    Hi again, Asya
    I think the results are fabulous! As Marta often says: "if you do nothing else, do LED light treatments!" (paraphrasing a bit) But that's the gist for sure!

    The Sirius Aurora is a great device and I love using it.. I feel that there is a remarkable positive change in the tightness and overall glow of my skin and I do think the Aurora is a big part of that!

  • December 18, 2011

    by Asya

    Thank you so much, Spo! I couldn't get any precise information on that and I definitely don't want to make my condition worse. It does make sense though that the light would rather stimulate the thyroid gland, so it should by worse for those suffering from hyperthyroidism.
    Are you happy by the way with the led light therapy results for now?

  • December 18, 2011

    by spo

    Hi Asya
    I think I can answer this one for you.. I'm a nurse, who is married to an endocrinologist, who specializes in thyroid conditions.

    Using the light - any colors - is totally safe for hypothyroidism. I am hypothyroid too and use the light faithfully 3x/wk. I've been using it for about 8 months now too..

    I would like to add though, that if someone is hyperthyroid, using the light over the neck where the thyroid is located, may not be wise. Pressing that area and applying heat there might increase the output of hormone from an already over-active gland. So it could make you more hyperthyroid.

    Even then though (hyperthyroidism) you could safely use the light on the face, avoiding the neck.

  • December 18, 2011

    by Asya

    Hi Marta,

    I have a hypothyroid function, but I was wondering if the led therapy could be safely used if the device is used only on the face?
    Have you come across any information on this?
    Thanks!

  • December 9, 2011

    by Marta

    Hi Toni, the red light would be used for pain.

  • December 8, 2011

    by toni

    Sorry, I have lower pain cause from a small herniation. I know the panal light would be better, but as you said more expensive. If I use the Sirius Aurora Led light, which color would i use for pain.

  • December 8, 2011

    by Marta

    Hi Toni, it is hard to say without knowing more about what kind of pain you are trying to control. However, I have used it on an achy shoulder. I have heard of people with migraine getting comfort from LED. You might, however, be better off with an LED panel light that is more powerful - and more expensive - than the Sirius.

  • December 8, 2011

    by toni

    Hi, I am new to lighted skin care. I was looking for a skin care product and a led lighted pain product. I came across products that work on skin and pain. Well this product do that for me?
    Toni

  • June 6, 2011

    by Emily

    Hello Marta, I wanted to let you (anyone else who's had this problem) know that this protocol works! I did the alcohol-wipe of the pins and conduction pads as instructed and have had no further problems. Thank you so much!
    And by the way: early last week when we had a pit of premature July here, my face became a sweaty greasy mess and my chin started breaking out...so I tried the blue light for the first time. Don't know if it was just lucky timing, but the breakouts were gone in another day! I'll definitely try blue light again as the summer progresses.
    Thanks again.

  • May 28, 2011

    by Emily

    Marta, thanks so much for this and for following up with Sirius, and for the very clear and explicit instructions. I have done it and will report back--Thanks!!

  • May 28, 2011

    by Marta

    Thanks for the update Emily. We have been discussing this with Sirius and they have assured as that future shipments of the Aurora will not have this problem. In the meantime, we now understand the cause - the insulation layer - and there is a procedure that you can try to prevent device from cutting out:
    After making sure that the device is turned off and completely unplugged, take off the LED panel. Moisten a Q-tip with rubbing alcohol, and apply it to the two metallic pins on the device AND the two metallic conduction pads on the LED panel that come into contact with the pins when the panel is snapped into place (please make sure NOT to get any alcohol on the circuitboard that is located on the panel in the middle between the two pads). Leave the device and the panel there for half an hour or so, then snap the panel back into place, plug in the device and turn it on.

    If you do try this Emily, please let us know if it works.

  • May 28, 2011

    by Emily

    Just wanted to update, since I had mentioned contacting the Sirius folks about the "unexpected and for no reason quit" problem my Aurora was giving me on a regular basis. As I commented on the 10th, their customer service was very professional and responsive, and I received the new unit a mere four days after providing my address via email. (And I did return the old one as requested.) The new one is definitely performing acceptably. There may be some design glitch--it will still, very occasionally, turn off, usually when I've shifted its position, and I'm pretty sure it's not me--but this is maybe once per marathon, not repeatedly. I am still seeing improvement and can live with its occasional pique.

  • May 24, 2011

    by Lynette

    I just found this site and have thoroghly enjoyed all the great info here! I am so very interested in the Aurora now. Will probably be purchasing hopefully soon.

  • May 10, 2011

    by Emily

    So glad, Bess, Jaysie, that you got something from my review. Jaysie, I do not recall what kind of IPL machine my dermatologists' office used at that time; I do remember that it was dramatic (dark spots get darker for a day or so before they literally slough off!) and really effective. But tres expensive even 5 years ago.
    Mark, believe it or not I got a very nice and professional email back from a customer service person at Sirius after my inquiry about this issue last week. She indicated that the unit must have been damaged in shipping. They are shipping me another and asked that I then return the original to them, which I'll of course gladly do. It is always so nice when a company provides prompt and responsive customer service--good to do business with a decent company--another plus for Sirius.

  • May 10, 2011

    by Mark

    Emily - an excellent review! I have had the same problem with the unit turning itself off unexpectedly and thought it might be me touching the control by accident, but I then consciously began to hold it so that my fingers weren't near the buttons and it still happens, so I do think it is the unit.

  • May 9, 2011

    by Oksana

    Jaysie,
    blue light individually, as a panel.

  • May 9, 2011

    by Jaysie

    Emily - I always read your comments/posts very carefully because they are so informed and this review has put some urgency on my "to buy" list for the Aurora. I can no longer wait. BTW, do you recall the type of IPL treatment/machine that was used on your pigmentation? I had IPL about 5-6 yrs ago and it did very little, but I have at least 3 different kinds of spots so it worked on some and not others.

    Oksana - Are the side effects you cite for the blue LED light strictly related to the blue panel? Or did you mean the 'blue spectrum' of light that is inherent in any LED? Obviously, I haven't done the research that you have! :)

    Thanks, gals, for all the info -- I just love TIA.

  • May 9, 2011

    by vicki

    tanning goggles a must, and can still watch real housewives, albeit a little blurry, makes time fly. initially had too close to eyes few times, and without a doubt caused me to catch a cold/congestion. has anyone else experienced? either way, goggles, no issue.

    my question is using something on face while using aurora. i was told better not to have anything on your face, cause serums and other products can block the light from deep penetration. i use replenish antioxidant afterwards.

  • May 9, 2011

    by Marta

    Hi Bess, Your Best Face has just given us free trial sizes of Antioxidents and Hydrate B Concentrates to give with purchases of the Aurora - just an FYI in case it brings your future closer to the present.

  • May 9, 2011

    by Bess

    Emily, thank you for this detailed review. We are the same age and seem to share similar anti-aging strategies. I see an Aurora in my future. My best to you, Bess.

  • May 9, 2011

    by Emily

    Jana, thanks, glad if it was helpful! And thank you Oksana for the comments on goggles--I'd better get some! One thing I meant to mention: while I am very pleased with the effects of the green light, I have not yet tried the Marta regimen of using it in conjunction with the Lumixyl brightening cream she wrote up last month. That might be next.

  • May 9, 2011

    by Jana

    What a great review, Emily, thank you! I've been awaiting reader reviews on Aurora and yours is well-written & comprehensive. Oksana - thanks, too, for your input. Much appreciated to both Emily & Oksana.

  • May 9, 2011

    by Timothy Artinger

    If I had the money I'd totally love to try this product. I've been interested in LED light therapy since I was 14.. I'm almost 20 now. And while I am young a high stress and nutritionally deficient life left me with skin not so good for my age.. I do have eye puffiness and loss of firmness, forehead lines and acne damage. I've just started vitamins and minerals.. Drinking more water and starting increased skin care applications with helpful ingredients. The next step I would think in increasing the overall appearance and health of my skin and body would be to try LED light therapy. I think it's generally effective and does offer a great advantage of doing something good at a good price (not salon).

  • May 9, 2011

    by Oksana

    I have been using Aurora for about 2 months; not as dilligently as Emily (about every other or 4th night), but I have also noticed some positive results.
    One of my favourite results is the decrease in the size of the pores. The "crows" are smoother as well.
    I have intially started with red/blue back to back; then decided I wished for a more evenly pigmented complexion and changed my routine to red/green.
    Interestingly, I had a very slight flare-up of pigmentation when I started using green light at first. I attributed it to the pigmentary "purging" d/t the effect that the green light has on melanin - it breaks it down. The flare-up reolved, and I see more even complexion. I am looking to add Lightning(Cosmedix) in the next couple of weeks. I have been using Rosehip Vit C serum (MadeFromEarth)with LED treatments so far.
    Now, I have done some reserach into LED therapy, indications, available evidence, etc. I am HAPPY that I have been using tanning goggles since the very beginning, and here is why.
    Here is the synapsis of the evidence I have found so far in r/t to blue LED light:
    - it suppresses the levels of melatonin - the hormone needed for uninterrupted circadian rhythm (you need it to sleep)- long-term effects of melatonin suppression has been demonstrated to cause breast cancer in shift-workers
    - the retinas in our eyes do not filter blue light well; since blue light is the brightest in the spectrum, the natural reaction of the pupil is to constrict. In the long-term, it may cause an onset of closed-angle glaucoma and retinal damage. There is a strong connection between blue light therapy for seasonal affective disorder and macular degeneration.
    On my behalf, I did notice some blurriness in my color vision after treatments with red/blue lights. It did not last long, and was never severe. It happened only a few times that I accidentally "swiped" the blue light within my field of vision, while changing from zone to zone. However, I will not be continuing with the blue light any longer.
    There is definite evidence to prove that red/blue combo works particularly well for acne sufferers. If you must use blue light, use it during the day-light hours - blue light does not have the same strong straining effect on the eye structures in the daytime.
    Overall, I think it's a great device, similar to diet and exercise ;-) The more you do it, the better the results are.
    USE TANNING GOGGLES!

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