StriVectin according to StriVectin:

“StriVectin® is the largest independent prestige skin care company, focusing on clinical anti-aging skin care solutions. Backed by science and rigorous clinical validation, StriVectin is at the forefront of skin care technology and product innovation.  Its unique dual-use repair cream StriVectin-SD® Intensive Concentrate for Stretch Marks and Wrinkles™ is a best-seller around the world, and is often credited with starting the clinical cosmeceutical skin care category. StriVectin products are sold through department stores and specialty retailers in North America, Europe, the Middle East and Asia. The company maintains corporate offices in New York, NY, and Raleigh, NC, and research facilities in Tucson, AZ.”

The Good

It seems there’s not much not to like about StriVectin. Their name alone sounds like a magic word, like simply uttering it could turn the clock back thirty years. They are “the largest”, their products are “based on science”, their product is “dual-use". Based on their company overview, they are “often credited” with starting a new beauty category. StriVectin was known for their claim “Better Than Botox”. Unfortunately, party poopers at the FDA, after three years of trying, forced them to put a question mark at the end of that statement.

The Bad

Using StriVectin won’t turn your face into a mess of pustular boils, but better than Botox? Definitely not. Despite all of the apparent scientific research and rigorous clinical validation StriVectin is doing, their product made TIA’s list of Five Worst Anti-Aging Creams. So what’s wrong with StriVectin?

Let’s stick strictly to performance. Early on, using StriVectin, thanks to a nice sheen from her cheekbones to crows feet, Marta received positive comments about her skin. But inexplicably, after a few months, the product ceased to work. She wasn’t alone in this assessment, as women in countless forums and reviews reported similar results. What’s more, Marta pointed out that ProVectin, a blatant StriVectin rip off is a much better deal at $14.99 than StriVectin at $59.

Additionally, Marta was a bit perplexed and concerned about some ingredients contained in StriVectin products. The Neck Cream, for example, contains Disodium Distyrylbiphenyl Disulfonate, a controversial ingredient also found in wood sealant.

The Truth

StriVectin, owned by Klein-Becker, a company founded by neither Klein nor a Becker, is not to be trusted. StriVectin’s Director of Scientific Affairs, Dr. Daniel B. Mowrey, is not a medical doctor, but a PHD. Klein Becker’s other “doctor”, Nathalie Chevreau is a nutritionist. The company has been embroiled in charges of fraud, and repeated FDA investigation. StriVectin, a meaningless, quasi-scientific name, might as well be something as random as Bologna Sandwich.

And based on the information StriVectin posts on their company website, they have no intention to change their deceitful ways. The language in their company description, while filled with official sounding words and phrases, is intentionally vague and misleading.

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