Personally, I like the whole idea of a Swiss company that comes up with something called Miracle Hangover Cure, which gets banned, then Miracle Eye Drops, which gets banned, and then a face cream, which gets banned, and has a CEO who says  "our main challenge is our products work a bit too well".  That's the  kind of glass-half-full-guy that I want on my team.

Anyway, the company is called Ethos and the cream (clearly the Miracle appellation wasn't on a winning streak for them) is called Rejuvion and it has been banned in Norway on the grounds that it contains a drug and therefore must be regulated as such. The ingredient in question is called carnosine and there is no question that it is interesting:

Carnosine is a natural amino-acid that is a potent anti-oxidant, it helps to chelate ionic metals (flush toxins from the body), it has immune boosting properties, it is known to reduce and prevent cell damage caused by beta amyloid (the substance found in the brain of Alzheimer disease patients) and recent evidence even suggests that Carnosine has a important role in the sense of smell.

The thing I find exciting is that Australian researchers claim it can extend the HayFlick Limit. The Hayflick Limit is the name given to the sad fact that our cells will only divide and reproduce 52 times before dying altogether (no matter how much peeling you undergo). Carnosine may give us up to another 10!

Carnosine is taken as a supplement by bodybuilders and those who think it will improve their mental faculties. Whilst it is non-toxic, imbibing too much can cause muscle spasms.

I am guessing that carnosine was in the Miracle Eye Drops as well, since I just read that Russian scientists found that it is a great cure for cataracts. And if it can cure hangovers too, then they are definitely on to something.

Rejuvion doesn't appear to be available in the US and I can't find that many products that contain carnosine.