The other day, I noticed that the makers of Cor Silver Soap had brought out a new anti-wrinkle serum to "compliment the benefits of the wonder bar". There are several good peptides in Cor Wrinkle Serum ($108), but nothing that is a real standout. What did intrigue me, however, is the ingredient common to both soap and serum: silver.

Cor Silver Soap boasts a patented nano-silver with silica. Silver is a known antibacterial and crops up in acne treatments. Disulfide bonds play an important role as reversible switches for proteins in bacteria. Silver works as a catalyst for denaturating the sulfide bonds in these proteins. It also acts in generating oxygen from air or water which in turn destroys the cell wall membranes of bacteria.

This antibacterial action has led silver to be added to socks to help neutralize foot odor. However, there may be something more toxic about your socks than the mere smell. Scientists have found that silver nano-particles don't discriminate and zap good bacteria as well as the bad.

What of it's role in an anti-wrinkle serum? That might not be a silver bullet either. Long-term use of silver preparations can lead to argyria, a condition in which silver salts deposit in the skin, eyes, and internal organs, and the skin turns ashen gray.

As a supplement, silver has been touted as a cure-all for everything from AIDS to arthritis. However, the FDA has concluded that the risk of using silver products exceeds any unsubstantiated benefit.

Ingredients in Cor Wrinkle Serum

Purified Water, Butylene Glycol, Sodium Hyaluranote, Ammonium Acryloyldimethyltuarate/VP Copolymer, PEG-60 Hydrogenated Castor Oil, Carboner, Alcohol, Triethanolamine, Titanium Dioxide and Mica, Silver Citrate, Silica, Soluble Collagen, Xantham Gum, Punica Granatum Extract, Acetyl Hexapeptide, Palmitoyl
Pentapeptide, Copper Tripeptide, Phenoxyethanol, Citrus Perfume Oil