They say don't judge a book by its cover but a new study might just prove that you can. Scientists at Yale University claim they've discovered that the more wrinkles a woman has in early menopause, the lower her bone density. How rude, I'm sure women aren't going to be thrilled by people gauging their bone density by looking at their wrinkles.

"In postmenopausal women, the appearance of the skin may offer a glimpse of the skeletal well-being, a relationship not previously described," Dr. Lubna Pal, associate professor of reproductive endocrinology and fertility at the university's medical school, said in a written statement.

In the study which was presented at a medical conference in Boston, Dr. Pal studied 114 menopausal women in their late 40s and early 50s that weren't on hormone therapy. They measured the number and depth of wrinkles then followed that up by using x-rays to measure the women's bone density.

Scientist hope that this new revelation will allow simple test to be done to see which women are at risk for fractures. The idea behind this is that both skin and bone are made up of collagen so as one goes, there's a strong chance so does the other. It just so happens that the other, our skin, is a very easy to see which may make scientists job a lot easier.

But don't go chugging collagen to build your bones up, collagen is actually broken down before it reaches your bones. Weightlifting however can improve collagen quality in bones and simple lifestyle changes like avoiding smoking and excess drinking will help keep your collagen levels up and your bones strong.

But not everyone is convinced. Just because you have skin wrinkles doesn't mean your bones are becoming brittle. In fact, many people that spend time in the sun develop wrinkles, but at the same time are strengthening their bones with vitamin D thanks to the sun. If that's the case then it could be argued that those with wrinkles might have higher bone density.

But not so fast, too much sun exposure and can quicken collagen and eslastin loss.

Clearly a confusing mess.

What we can say though is that women over 50 are at a greater risk for bone fractures from osteoporosis. Exercise, get plenty of calcium, and have a good diet and you can put your bone woes to rest.