Reviewed by Becky

This was one home project my husband didn’t want anything to do with: helping me assess whether the CellulHitech anti-cellulite treatment from Italian company Dermophisiologique had made any improvements to the shape, size or texture of my thighs and backside.

I asked Steve at the beginning of the month if he could help me define a starting point.

“Um... I don’t know. Why don’t you take a picture?”


Okay then.

We continued this conversation once a week over the next month while both of us carefully inspecting whether the CellulHitech siero (serum) and crema (cream) were having any positive effect. Neither of us could tell. It’s worth noting that I would not have purchased this treatment on my own. I have mild cellulite on the backs of my thighs and the same on my bottom. While nothing looked very different in terms of the depth of my cellulite nodes, nothing looked worse either. The only change I could see was more hydrated skin overall. That being said, I have also been more diligent about applying lotion all over because of the cold weather.

I have been using both products layered together once a day after I shower. There were a few days when I couldn’t tolerate the sickly sweet smell of the crema (which lasts a while), so I skipped it. I got over this eventually. The siero is clear and runny but soaks in quickly
and has a lighter, more herbal scent. My skin would feel slightly tacky for a few minutes until it dried. The long list of the siero’s herbal ingredients, including camellia sinensis, horse chestnut extract, echinacea, hyaluronic acid, and caffeine, made sense; the patented “Poiesis Factor” and “Diachisis Factor,” not so much. The box label claims the Poiesis Factor encourages better circulation and promotes collagen fiber growth. This action is apparently aided by the Diachisis Factor, a “widely certified active principle that combats blemishes typical of cellulite by breaking down and dissolving the nodes and encouraging ‘rejuvenated’ skin tissue.” I was curious about this term, but when I looked it up several online medical dictionaries defined diachisis as “the loss of function and electrical activity in an area of the brain due to a lesion in a remote area that is neuronally connected with it.” What does brain function have to do with my cellulite?

The crema also contains interesting herbal ingredients (shea butter, almond and jojoba oils, red clover, grape leaf, ginkgo biloba, and caffeine), with claims of breaking down the edema and draining fluids and toxins. Neither product contains mineral oils, petroleum, artificial colors or parabens, which I always appreciate. The crema absorbed quickly as well.

If I sound a bit skeptical here, it is because the claims sound bold in not only treating but also resolving cellulite. While not an expert by any means, everything I have read about cellulite says any topical treatment is temporary at best and that any longer-lasting results need to come primarily from diet and exercise. Many (if not most) of us have cellulite, so learning to live with it - or finding a mate who refuses to comment on it - may be the best treatment of all.